Updated:
Original:

Authentic English Scones With Currants

Maria is a master of public health and a master gardener. She and her husband, known as The Gardener & The Cook, live in coastal Alabama.

While in the UK, we had the option plain scones or fruit scones. We always chose the scones with currants.

While in the UK, we had the option plain scones or fruit scones. We always chose the scones with currants.

A couple of years ago, we spent a week in Scotland and England, where we fell in love with delicious scones and ate them with strawberry jam every day.

When we returned home, my husband, Bo, whom you know as "the cook", tried to re-create those scones. He tried multiple recipes, but none produced the result either of us wanted. The scones from the first recipe tasted fine, but they didn’t rise, so the texture was off completely. He tried another, and those rose a little more, but they were still not right. The third recipe he tried, the scones spread out and looked more like cookies than scones. After trying to find a good recipe, he eventually decided to create his own. It took a lot of trial and error, but he has perfected his own recipe. We are sharing it with you here.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups gluten-free flour (or self-rising flour)
  • 1/2 stick unsalted butter, softened overnight (see note below)
  • 2 tablespoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup currants
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cup almond milk (or your preferred type of milk)

Recipe Notes

  • Butter: leave the butter out overnight to soften and reach room temperature. Scones are not flaky, so you don’t want cold butter.
  • Milk: begin with 1/4 cup milk, then add more if needed to reach the desired dough consistency. This will depend on your local humidity. We use almond or soy milk, but real milk, skim or whole, will do.
  • Pan: bake them in a cake pan. This prevents them from spreading, so they must rise upward instead of outward, as they will on a cookie sheet or other flat pan.
Baking the scones in a pan that requires they touch the sides, as well as each other, forces them to rise rather than spread out.

Baking the scones in a pan that requires they touch the sides, as well as each other, forces them to rise rather than spread out.

Instructions

  1. Put all dry ingredients into a mixing bowl.
  2. Cut in the butter using whisk attachment on mixer.
  3. Add currants.
  4. Beat egg and milk together, then add to mixture.
  5. Mix together using dough hook or mix by hand.
  6. Add more milk as needed to form a stiff dough.
  7. Roll dough into a ball, on floured board. Then press it out to a thickness of 1 inch (about 2.5 cm).
  8. Bake at 400°F for 23 minutes, or until golden brown. (Time will vary, depending on your oven.)

British English vs. American English

English scones should look more like our Americans biscuits, at least in size and shape.

What we call cookies, they call biscuits. What we call biscuits, they call scones.

Scones and strawberry jam – it doesn’t get any better than this. Well, maybe with a cup of tea, of course.

Scones and strawberry jam – it doesn’t get any better than this. Well, maybe with a cup of tea, of course.

© 2021 MariaMontgomery

Your Comments Are Always Welcome

MariaMontgomery (author) from Coastal Alabama, USA on September 29, 2021:

Hi, Thelma! We love them with currants, but currants are hard to find sometimes here in the U.S. I hope they are readily available for you in Germany. Thanks for reading my article, and for commenting.

Thelma Alberts from Germany on September 29, 2021:

Yummy! It has been a while ago since I last baked English scones. Thanks for sharing your recipe. I have not tried scones with currants yet. I will soon.

MariaMontgomery (author) from Coastal Alabama, USA on September 27, 2021:

Hi Lora! I love tea in the afternoons. Let me know how it works for you. Thanks for commenting.

Lora Hollings on September 27, 2021:

This recipe looks absolutely delicious and you write vert clear and easy to follow instructions. I love scones with jelly when I have my tea in mid afternoon. I can’t wait to try your recipe! Thanks for sharing.

MariaMontgomery (author) from Coastal Alabama, USA on September 25, 2021:

You're welcome. Thanks for reading my article. I hope you make them and enjoy them.

Peggy Woods from Houston, Texas on September 24, 2021:

It has been many a year since I have made a scone. Thanks for the reminder of how delicious they can be.

MariaMontgomery (author) from Coastal Alabama, USA on September 24, 2021:

Glad you liked it. Thanks for reading my article.

MariaMontgomery (author) from Coastal Alabama, USA on September 24, 2021:

Could be. We do have self-rising flour, but these were made with gluten-free flour. I don't know if gluten-free flour is available in a self-rising type or not. I'll have to check on that. Bo just kept increasing the baking powder until it was so much we could taste it -- that was not so good. We may go back to regular self-rising flour just to test the difference. Thanks for the tip. I hadn't thought of that.

MariaMontgomery (author) from Coastal Alabama, USA on September 24, 2021:

It did. He worked on his scone recipe for quite a while, and was determined to get it right. They're still not as tall as the delicious ones we had at a B&B in Scorton, England, but they are really good. I just added a link for the jam recipe to the scone article, and a link for the scone recipe to the jam article, as they kind of go together. Wish I had done that before publishing. Oh, well.

MariaMontgomery (author) from Coastal Alabama, USA on September 24, 2021:

Scones are wonderful, aren't they? I haven't tried making them yet -- they are Bo's territory. They don't take nearly as long to make as the strawberry jam that goes with them.

Bill Holland from Olympia, WA on September 24, 2021:

What's good for the Queen Mother is certainly good enough for me. Thanks for the guidance. I do love me some scones.

Pamela Oglesby from Sunny Florida on September 24, 2021:

These scones along with strawberry jam sounds like a very good breakfast. Thanks for this recipe, Maria. It sounds like a lot of work went into perfecting it.

John Hansen from Gondwana Land on September 23, 2021:

I love scones, Maria. Being in Australia we follow the British lead in regard to scones vs biscuits vs cookies etc.

One thing I wonder is do you have ‘self-raising’ flour in the USA? We don’t have to add baking powder because we can buy four that already has the raising agent in it. That may explain why following the British recipe, you couldn’t get the scones to rise properly at first.

Miebakagh Fiberesima from Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NIGERIA. on September 23, 2021:

Well understood. Thanks.

Related Articles