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The Best Homemade Peach Brandy Recipe~The Reluctant Peach Tree and A Baby Raccoon

Updated on March 17, 2016
Stephanie Henkel profile image

Old family recipes make the most satisfying meals and are always a hit with family and friends. Here are some of Stephanie's favorites.

Baby Raccoon in Peach Tree

Baby raccoon hides in the top of the peach tree.
Baby raccoon hides in the top of the peach tree. | Source

Ripe peaches on our tree are ready to pick.

This crop of peaches is ripe for the picking.
This crop of peaches is ripe for the picking. | Source

Tree Ripened Peaches

Is there anything more luscious than a juicy sweet tree-ripened peach? When we bought our house with its very own peach tree, we immediately began looking forward to our very own juicy fruit.

The only thing was, the peach tree at our new house was ugly. It leaned to the right at a precarious angle, and it was lopsided. In July it lost all of it’s leaves and stood there naked for several months. This seemed like a good indication that the tree was never going to produce fruit. In November, when everything else in our garden was going dormant, the tree decided to bloom. What the?????

How to Tell if Peaches are Ripe

Best Time to Pick Peaches

Peaches should have creamy or yellow color under the blush to indicate ripeness. Ripe peaches also have a good fragrance and a well-defined crease. If you are going to pick the fruit and use it immediately, you will want it at the peak of ripeness and it should be slightly softened. A tree-ripened peach has the most sugar content. A peach that is ripened after picking will get softer and flavor might increase, but sugar content will not increase.

Storing Peaches

You can refrigerate fully ripe peaches and they will keep for a few days. If you have ripe peaches that are still firm, leave them at room temperature (65-70°F) for a day or two to fully ripen. Peaches picked green will never ripen well.

Look Tree, Produce Fruit or Die!

The next spring, the tree leafed out but never bloomed. It leaned a little more to the right. Summer came and no fruit. By November when it decided to bloom again just in time for our first snow flurries, we decided to have a serious talk with it.

“Look, Tree, you’ve got to straighten out! Bloom in the spring! Produce fruit in the summer! Act like a normal peach tree or you’re firewood!”

To emphasize the point, we tied a rope to the tree, tied the other end to the jeep and pulled the peach tree upright. Then we put a few 2 x 4s around to keep it straight. That November it did not bloom. Good sign!

Peaches at last!

Finally, last April, our wacky tree decided to produce a profusion of flowers. Another good sign! It was so exciting, and in June we were rewarded with a bumper crop of wonderful, juicy peaches. Amazingly, they were insect and disease free even though we had not used any chemicals or pesticides on them. I loved picking them and arranging a basket or bowl as a centerpiece on the kitchen table. I loved the peachy scent and enjoyed having cut up peaches on my breakfast cereal or with sugar and cream for a desert.

After we had our fill of peaches and cream, peach pie and peach shortcake, we made peach jam. We gave peaches to the neighbors and our kids and the air conditioner repairman. There were still peaches on the tree!



Nutritional Value of Peaches

  • A peach contains many vitamins and minerals including vitamin A, C, riboflavin and beta carotene. A peach does not have any sodium, cholesterol or fat.

  • A medium peach has about 40 calories

  • 0.6g protein

  • 10g carbohydrates

  • 1.5g dietary fiber

Homemade Peach Jam - Yum!

Homemade Peach Jam
Homemade Peach Jam | Source

Raccoons provide the "Cute" factor

O.K., I admit it, the raccoons are in this story because the babies were so darned cute! We saw the mama raccoon bring her little family out of the woods in the late afternoon for a snack of dropped peaches and daintily pick them up and nibble on them. One day we noticed one of the little ones climb the tree and not come back down. When we went out to investigate, the baby raccoon was sitting on a high branch peering out at us from between the leaves. He was just too cute, so I got my camera with the telephoto lens and snapped a few photographs of the baby raccoon before we left him alone. Eventually, he made his way down the tree and back to his mama who was calling from the woods.

Making Peach Brandy

There were still more beautiful ripe peaches, so I decided to try my hand at making peach brandy. I searched old recipe books as well as the internet and finally decided to create my own recipe using a combination of techniques I had read about.

Peach brandy is basically a mixture of fruit and sugar. When left alone for a while, it will ferment and produce a peach flavored alcoholic liquid. By adding yeast to the sugar/fruit/water mixture, the fermentation process gets a jump start.

A basket of beautifully ripe peaches.

Basket of beautiful ripe peaches from our tree.
Basket of beautiful ripe peaches from our tree. | Source

Before you start

Before you start, make sure you have a stone crock or a few large glass or stoneware bowls. You can use plastic wrap to cover them. While the brandy is in the fermentation process, it’s a good idea to place the containers on trays in case it overflows. I learned this the hard way and had to clean up a sticky floor when my crock of brandy bubbled over during fermentation.

Peaches can be peeled if you wish, but leaving the skins on gives the brandy a pretty pink blush that is very attractive if you bottle it in clear glass.


This Peach "Brandy" is Technically Peach Wine

The recipe included here is called "Brandy" by those who make it. However, technically it is wine because it is not fortified with spirits. According to Wikipedia, true brandy has an alcohol content of 30-60%. The alcohol content of wine ranges from 8-20%. Although I do not know the alcohol content of my peach "brandy", it's probably in the range of wine and not true brandy.

Easy Peach Brandy Recipe

Ingredients for Peach Brandy:

  • 3 quarts cut-up peaches with pits. You don't have to peel them, just cut out any bad spots. The tree-ripened peaches have the most sugar and are the juiciest. Be flexible on the amounts, you can use more or less depending on how much fruit is available and the size of your containers.
  • 4 pounds sugar
  • 6 cups cold water. Use chemical free water for this – purchase bottled spring water if you have chlorine in your tap water.
  • 6 tsp. dry yeast

Instructions for Making Peach Brandy:

Wash peaches well and cut each one into 4 or 5 pieces. It’s fine to leave stones in, but I usually take them out because it makes more room for the peaches in the container.

Layer peaches with sugar in a large stone crock. Dissolve yeast in about a cup of warm water and add to the peaches and sugar. Pour the cold water on top to cover the peaches. Be sure to leave room for the fermenting process to bubble. Cover the crock with a plate or a clean towel and place it out of the way on a tray with low sides to catch any of the juice that might overflow the crock.

After a week, stir the mixture with a long handled spoon, cover and let sit. I like to stir it once a week for about 4 weeks. The mixture will bubble a little when you stir it. After 4 weeks, strain the mixture and discard the peach pulp and pits. Pour the brandy into bottles (I use whatever is handy from mason jars to old wine bottles). Cover the bottles tightly and store in a cool, dark place. The brandy will taste better if you let it sit for a few months.


Homemade peach brandy is wonderful poured over ice cream or just served in a small glass to sip. It’s a sweet, almost syrupy liquor, but it does have alcohol content, and tastes wonderful! Enjoy!


Note: For another special treat, try making Blackberry Brandy!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Copyright 2011©Stephanie Henkel


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    • Christine P Ann profile image

      Christine P Ann 5 years ago from Australia

      What a pleasant hub. I like the different aspects incorporated into it, the cute picture, the story about the fruitless tree, the success, the sharing of the fruit, the recipe. well done

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      Hi Christine, Thanks for reading my hub and taking the time to comment. We're now looking forward to our second crop of peaches and hoping to make more of the luscious peach brandy. Maybe our family of raccoons will be back too!

    • BkCreative profile image

      BkCreative 5 years ago from Brooklyn, New York City

      Oooh love this and the photos! Yay! When my son and daughter in law moved into their home there was an espaliered peach tree - and those first fruits showing on the branches had me keeping a bag packed so as soon as they ripened I can get out there and eat peaches until I passed out. What a lovely dream and goal in life.

      What happened though - when the peaches ripened, well the squirrels took every single one (wait - I think my DIL got one). They'd take a bite from one - toss it and get a fresh one. The squirrels worked so hard that year - making sure they got every single peach before we did. This will be the 3rd year - and well, I guess we have to share - and wait and see.

      But one way or another - I want peach brandy. Thanks so much for your delectable recipe. This is a done deal in peach season. Can't wait. Yay - and rated way up!

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      BKCreative,

      Luckily, we don't have squirrels in our backyard, yet, and the raccoons seem happy with the dropped peaches. The birds do taste a few... It's frustrating when the fruit is ruined before you can pick it! Sure hope you get enough to try the Peach Brandy recipe ... it's luscious!

      Thanks for commenting and rating my hub!

    • Simone Smith profile image

      Simone Haruko Smith 5 years ago from San Francisco

      How cute! And beautiful Hub!

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      Thanks Simone! I think I enjoyed looking at the beautiful ripe peaches almost as much as I enjoyed eating them. This year, I'll have to paint a peach still-life...while sipping peach brandy, of course!

    • baygirl33 profile image

      victoria 5 years ago from Hamilton On.

      That brandy sounds wonderful I might try it if the peaches are not too expensive next summer.The peach lucky peach tree is hilarious.Thanks for not cutting it down.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      Baygirl33 - If you have to buy peaches, go to an orchard or farm stand as tree ripened peaches will have a higher sugar content. Good luck with it! Thanks for visiting my hub and for commenting!

    • baygirl33 profile image

      victoria 5 years ago from Hamilton On.

      ok Stephanie! Thanks!

    • travel_man1971 profile image

      Ireno Alcala 5 years ago from Bicol, Philippines

      I've tasted a homemade peach brandy when I was in Peru during my voyage as seafarer. One stevedore exchanged it for a pair of durable working shoes. I shared it with my Filipino officer who celebrated his birthday right after we finished discharging cargo. It's superb and as far as I know, brandy is good for the heart.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      Wow, I never tried trading it for anything! You have had an interesting life! Sharing a little peach brandy is certainly good for the heart, and for one's mood. :) Thanks for checking in and commenting!

    • happypuppy profile image

      happypuppy 5 years ago

      Cute baby raccoon and lovely hub! I love peaches. They have a very pleasant fragrance, and peach blossoms are so pretty.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      Hi Happypuppy, Those baby raccoons were adorable, especially the one I photographed sitting up in the tree top. He really loved those peaches, and I was lucky to get a big crop that year so there was plenty of fruit to share! Thanks for visiting my hub and for your comments!

    • happypuppy profile image

      happypuppy 5 years ago

      I totally agree with you. The baby raccoon is so so adorable! Looks as if he's modelling...definitely not camera shy. You've done a terrific job in capturing him. I love his expression!

    • PoliCommandments profile image

      PoliCommandments 5 years ago from DeKalb, IL

      This is definitely cute. I love how you were able to craft your own recipe, and enjoy the presence of some furry friends. However, the raccoons, however cute they are, do worry me a bit, since they are supposed to be nocturnal animals.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      PoliCommandments,

      We were a little surprised to see them out during the daylight hours, but it was late afternoon or early morning when we would see them. Of course, we did not get close to them. The photo I posted was taken with a telephoto lens.

      Thanks for visiting my hub and for your comments.

    • Dennis 4 years ago

      Yes raccoons are cute I leave them alone. Now I have at. about 12 of them and they keep multiplying. HELP!!!!!

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 4 years ago from USA

      Dennis - I know that raccoons can be a problem in some areas as they will eat just about anything, and they are so curious that they manage to get into all kinds of troublesome places. The best advice is to make sure your garbage is in raccoon proof containers. Bird feeders and fallen seed will also attract them as will gardens with yummy fresh vegetables...I don't really know the answer, sorry!

    • Wes Coon 4 years ago

      I am just about to get started on this recipe. What type of yeast did you use?

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 4 years ago from USA

      Wes Coon - I just just regular dry Fleishman's dry yeast for baking. I don't think it matters a great deal as the yeast is just to jump start the fermentation process. Some recipes don't even call for yeast. Good luck with your peach brandy!

    • charlie-1148@hotmail.com 4 years ago

      I think you for your ricepes for the peach- brandy, I'm sure I will enjoy

      it if I can wait that long .I was thinking that I had to cook it like shine,

      but I dont can you make apple with that same ricepes if you can let me know.

    • Jpage 4 years ago

      how much did your recipe create?

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 4 years ago from USA

      Charlie-1148 - No, you don't have to cook anything to make peach brandy. I have not tried any other fruit, but I imagine that the juicier fruits like plums and cherries might work better this way than apples. No harm in trying, though.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 4 years ago from USA

      Jpage - The recipe is not that exact, so the finished product will fluctuate depending on how many peaches you start with.

    • Dave Hill 4 years ago

      Enjoyed your hub! I have an Elberta peach tree and I think I will try your bandy recipe. I also have a seedless concord grape vine and am considering adding in a pint of those.. what do you think about this idea?? :)

      dave

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 4 years ago from USA

      Dave Hill - I think that peaches and grapes might be an interesting combination. The addition of concord grapes will give your brandy a little more color - maybe with a slight purple tinge? If you have a lot of peaches, you might try some plain peach and some with the grapes to see which you like better. Good luck with it!

    • Dave Hill 4 years ago

      Thanks Stephanie for the fast response! I had goggled another recipe also when I found your blog and I have a question.. would you take a look at this site?? The amount of peaches are the same.. but the water seems to be very excessive.. over 2 gallons additional gallons compared to yours.. Is your brandy concentrated and need to be thinned when bottled? If not.. it seems like all that water would cause it to be way to thin...??

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 4 years ago from USA

      Dave Hill - My brandy is slightly syrupy, but I do not thin it. I think the recipe calling for all that water would be thin, but it might be fine. It's a totally different recipe. I don't really have an opinion without trying it.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 4 years ago from USA

      Hi Dave Hill - I'm so glad that your peach brandy is coming along so well. I'm sure there is a way to check the alcohol content, but I've never done it except to taste the brandy. I did enjoy those taste tests! It sounds like you're doing it perfectly, and your grape wine/brandy must be beautiful. I've never tried watermelon wine -- I'll have to take a look at the recipe as we can get amazing watermelons where I live.

    • Dave Hill 4 years ago

      Hi Steph, we came out with very nice grape wine and peach wine. I did more research and discovered to turn this into brandy one has to distill the wine to take off the "undesirable alcohols". Since our government takes a rather dim view of that activity we will just enjoy this the way it is!!

      In our research, we learned one needs additives that stabilize the wine and also kills the bacteria to age it without spoiling. However, 2 or 3 months should be fine. Our wines turned out very tasty with quite a kick!! Thanks posting your recipe. :)

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 4 years ago from USA

      Hi Dave, Glad you're enjoying your peach brandy! Ours didn't last long enough to worry about spoiling! :)

    • gary plumlee 3 years ago

      I have about two dozen quarts of home canned apricots. We grow and can most of our food. Anyway none of us likes apricots and I would like to make apricot brandy. We canned it with canning sugar. How do I turn it into brandy?

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 3 years ago from USA

      Gary plumlee - I've never tried making brandy with canned fruit, but I imagine that you could do it by opening your jars and layering the canned fruit with sugar in a crock, following the directions for the peach brandy. Let me know how you make out! Sounds delicious!

    • Stephen White 3 years ago

      Followed this recipe for peach brandy last October (2012) and enjoyed an excellent brandy in March. I am using a variation of the same recipe to make cherry brandy right now -just started the batch today.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 3 years ago from USA

      Stephen White - Thanks for coming back and giving us an update on your brandy making. I'm so glad the recipe worked so well for you. Cherry brandy sounds delicious! Mmmmm........!

    • Rob 3 years ago

      Hi Stephanie:

      I have followed your instructions but noticed that the sugar and yeast forming a sediment on the bottom, Is that normal? I am in my 10th day and the mixture smells of alcohol. I suppose I will wait 2 more weeks as you suggest,right?

      Thank you

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 3 years ago from USA

      Hi Rob,

      As the peaches and sugar ferments, you'll start to smell alcohol and that wonderful peachy smell. h It's natural for a sediment to form. Mix it with a long handled spoon once a week, and let it continue to ferment. Yes, wait at least two more weeks (4 weeks total) for the fermentation to complete. When you strain your brandy, most of the sediment will be strained out. The finer the material you use to strain it, the more clear your brandy will be. Enjoy!

    • Rob 3 years ago

      Thank you so much Stephanie for your very kind and rapid response. That is especially appreciated since I know that you are most likely on the road somewhere.

      I was thinking of using cheesecloth to strain the brandy. Did you ever find a way to use the peaches other than just composting? Thanks again Stephanie for inspiring me (and others) to try this. It is exciting!

      Have a great day wherever you are.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 3 years ago from USA

      Hi Rob,

      Cheesecloth will work just fine as a strainer. If you find you're getting too much sediment, just use two layers. I just compost the strained out pulp. Since I leave the skins on, the pulp isn't that appealing for other food use.

      Thanks so much for your comments and feedback on your peach brandy. It sounds like it's coming along just fine! Happy trails to you!

    • Deb Leone 3 years ago

      Do you think that this would work with cranberries? Do you need to keep it in a warm or cool place while fermenting? Thanks, Deb

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 3 years ago from USA

      Deb Leone - I'm not sure if this would work with cranberries or not. It seems that raw cranberries might not release the juice that peaches do. Perhaps if you put them through a grinder or chopped them first it would work better. Sounds good! I love cranberry wine!

      I keep them at room temperature in a dark place while fermenting. Since our house is air conditioned, it was probably about 74-76° when I did the peach brandy, but I don't think it would hurt to be warmer or cooler. Good luck with the cranberries!

    • Deb Leone 3 years ago

      Thanks, Stephanie. I'll let you know how it turns out. I'm excited!

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 3 years ago from USA

      Good luck, Deb!

    • Suzanne 3 years ago

      How large of a crock is needed? I have a 2 gallon on hand.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 3 years ago from USA

      Suzanne - A two gallon crock will work just fine. Just add more peaches and sugar if you have extra room.

    • Momma try 3 years ago

      so I have been canning tons of peaches and have a few cans that did not seal do you think I could just put them in a biggest jar and sugar and yeast and that would be good??

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 3 years ago from USA

      Momma try - It might work to use your canned peaches. Let me know how it works out for you if you try it.

    • Deb Leone 3 years ago

      So I bottled my brandy. It tastes delicious, but it's pretty thin will it get more syrupy as it ages?

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 3 years ago from USA

      Deb Leone - If you've already strained and bottled it, I don't think the consistency will change. Just enjoy as it is!

    • Joyce 3 years ago

      This recipe sounds great, it reminds me when I was little girl how my Great Grandmother use to make her peach brandy. Although, I don't remember her ever using any yeast. Great Grandmother only used the peach peels to make her brandy, water and sugar. She would let the peach peels and water and sugar set for weeks on the porch in the summer heat. I never saw her use yeast. Is it possible to ferment the peach brandy without yeast. Also, in your recipe you use yeast but you never specify what kind of yeast. For what I hear some yeasts are better than others. Are you using active dry yeast or instant dry yeast? Also, what brand or yeast are you using? I very much need to know this because, from what I hear certain yeast leaves a funky taste, other a bad taste and some yeast leaves the brandy bland (no flavor, smell or taste). Is this true? You can also email me at jycbrnch@yahoo.com. Thanks

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
      Author

      Stephanie Henkel 3 years ago from USA

      Hello Joyce - You can make the brandy without yeast. It just takes a little longer to start fermenting. The yeast gives the process a little head start. I used Fleischman's active dry yeast that comes in a jar...the same stuff I use for bread making, but you can just get the dry packets used for baking if you don't need bulk yeast. The recipe doesn't take that much. Good luck with your peach brandy!

    • Joyce 3 years ago

      Stephanie, thank you so much for writing me back. I didn't even realize you answered my questions. However, I do have more questions and in your instructions for your peach brandy you said that more peaches can be used if you like depending on the size of your crock. But, what you didn't mention is rather or not more sugar, yeast and water can be used. Here is the deal, I have a 10 gallon fermenter, a 7.5 gallon fermenter, a 3 gallon crock and a 2.5 gallon crock. I am going to make peach brandy in different ways to see which I like the best. I want to use the 7.5 gallon fermenter to make your recipe. Therefore, I would like to triple of more your recipe. So; my questions are 1) Can your recipe be doubled, tripled or more for my 7.5 gallon fermenter? 2) You are only using 6 cups of water so I would like to know just how much peach brandy does this recipe produce? Six cups of water seem like a small amount. I have another peach brandy recipe and it calls for 2 gallons and 3 quarts of water and 10 pounds of sugar for a 5 gallon crock. I am just trying to be as precise as I possibly can because I don't want to ruin my peach brandy by mixing the wrong amount of ingredients. Can you please advise me on what it is I need to do?

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 3 years ago from USA

      Hi Joyce - Thanks for stopping by again. I'm sure that you can double or triple the recipe and still get good results, but I can't really give you precise measurements for what your end product will be. A lot depends on how juicy or dry your peaches are. When you add sugar to the peaches, it will release the juices. No need to add more water than called for, but if you feel your batch is too dry, you can. I don't think it will hurt. I think that the ripeness of the fruit will also come into play as riper peaches will have a higher sugar content. I'd advise you to just go for it!

      Sorry I can't give you a more precise answer as I have never been that precise about making my peach brandy.

    • Becky 2 years ago

      hey Stephanie

      I am making peach brandy for the first time, and wondered if its normal for it to be so cloudy )its been in the crock pot for a month and I've just bottled it today)? Will the cloudiness clear, or do I need to do/add something to help?

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 2 years ago from USA

      Becky - The cloudiness is just bits of fruit suspended in the liquid and won't hurt anything, but it does look prettier if it's clear. Straining your peach brandy through a fine cheesecloth will help take the cloudiness out.

    • Ginnie 2 years ago

      I do not have a crock, can I use a 5 gallon plastic bucket?

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 2 years ago from USA

      Ginnie - I don't know about using plastic..it might affect the flavor. I'd go with glass, pottery or stainless steel. You can adjust the size of the recipe to the size of your container.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 2 years ago from USA

      Ginnie - I would avoid a plastic container because it could affect the taste. Use glass, stainless steel or pottery instead.

    • Jim Parks 18 months ago

      Hi, sorry to be pedantic, but what you describe is a fermented peach juice, a "peach wine" if you will, but it is not brandy. Brandy is a distilled spirit.

      To get brandy, you would take the product you have created and distill it in a still.

      Doesn't make your peach wine any less delicious or useful, but it isn't actually brandy.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 18 months ago from USA

      I'm sure you're right, Jim. This is delicious, but it is not distilled. Even so, it's pretty potent!

    • swheelscpa 17 months ago

      Hi Stephanie! Thanks for the info! I am in week 3 of your strawberry "brandy" recipe and is starting to look awesome. If I decide to make it a little more potent, what do you recommend I do in terms of adding vodka etc.? Thanks!

    • Bill baker 16 months ago

      I'm making your peach brandy and at six days it has a slight bitter taste is there something I can do to get rid of this

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 16 months ago from USA

      Bill Baker - I see that you wrote two messages about this and I am not approving the other one because it has your email address in it. However, I was confused that you asked if the lemon was making the peach brandy/wine bitter. My recipe does not call for lemon, so I don't know what recipe you are using. I wonder if you have used enough sugar and if you have stirred in the yeast and sugar well. If you tasted the brew from the top and got a taste of the yeast without sugar, it could be a little bitter. My advice would be to stir the mixture well and leave it alone for another couple of weeks. Unless your peaches were bad, all should go well. Good luck.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 16 months ago from USA

      Bill -- another thought -- does your water have added chlorine or chemicals? If so, that could also affect the flavor.

    • Florence and Donna 5 months ago

      Hi Stephanie ~ We are trying your recipe for peach brandy for the first time and are so looking forward to the outcome! Thank you so much for the online instructions!! :) Will let you know the outcome ....just have all the ingredients in the crock tonight so it will be a few weeks ... fingers crossed!

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 5 months ago from USA

      Florence and Donna - good luck with it! Wish I had some fresh peaches right now so I could make another batch!

    • Lucy Butler 4 months ago

      Well, I sent my question, but don't see it, so here goes again...

      Can this peach brandy, be made without using the yeast?

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 4 months ago from USA

      Lucy, I have not tried it without the yeast as the yeast is what starts the fermenting process. It might work without, just take longer to get going. Let me know how it works if you try it.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 4 months ago from USA

      Lucy, I have not tried it without the yeast as the yeast is what starts the fermenting process. It might work without, just take longer to get going. Let me know how it works if you try it.

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