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How to Make Cider from Apple Juice

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How to make Cider from Supermarket Ingredients

Cider is easier to make at home than either wine or beer and makes a very pleasant alternative, especially on a warm summer evening. To make cider traditionally, you need fresh cider apples and a heavy-duty screw press. To make it even more traditionally, you need a barn, a large oak cask that you can call a hogshead if you must, sackfuls of cider apples, a huge granite mill wheel and channel, and a horse that doesn't mind walking in circles for a few hours.

Alternatively, you can use supermarket apple juice and dried baker's yeast.

What You'll Need

Pop down to the supermarket and get a large plastic flagon (about 64 oz or 2 liters) of pure apple juice (not a cardboard carton) and a packet of dried baker's yeast. The brand of apple juice doesn't matter, but make sure there are no added preservatives, as these could prevent it from fermenting. (Some additional vitamin C is no problem.) If there are no preservatives, the juice will usually have been pasteurised to stabilise it. This gives it a darker colour than fresh juice, but we can live with that.

You will also need a teaspoon and a drinking straw, but you probably have these already! If you like, you can arrange everything neatly on the table and take a photograph like mine, but this step is entirely optional!

This is all you need.
This is all you need. | Source

How to Do It

  1. Open the flagon and completely remove the inner foil seal (if any).
  2. With the drinking straw, enjoy the top two inches (5 cm) of apple juice. Waste not, want not! (The reason for this is to make a little room in the container.)
  3. Carefully tip half a level teaspoon of dried yeast onto the surface of the juice, but do not shake or stir.
  4. Replace the cap. Tighten it, then back it off a quarter turn to allow gas to escape.

And that is it! There is nothing more to do but wait (the entire process takes about five days), watch, and read my deathless prose....

Watch as the yeast quickly re-hydrates and expands across the surface, forming a slurry. The dormant yeast cells waken in a yeast heaven and soon start gorging on the sugar and nutrients in the juice and replicating like crazy. This is a yeast orgy. Clumps of cells start to break off and fall slowly to the bottom, where they carry on working on the fruit sugars, producing alcohol and carbon dioxide gas.

...five minutes after adding yeast, you'll see some action...
...five minutes after adding yeast, you'll see some action... | Source

What Will Happen

After a few hours, the juice should be bubbling merrily, with a good head of froth on top. Baker's yeast tends to be a much faster starter than wine yeast and doesn't take long to get going. You'll notice that the juice has gone cloudy. This is normal. The yeast population is now far larger than the original teaspoonful and the rising carbon dioxide bubbles keep everything in motion.

The fermentation doesn't go on forever. After a few days, the available sugar is all used up, the bubbling stops, and the yeast cells start to drop to the bottom. It's impossible to say when this will happen as it depends on the sweetness of the original juice, the strain of yeast, the ambient temperature, and several other factors.

  • When the fermentation has slowed to one or two bubbles per second, typically after five days, taste it using a drinking straw. It should be fairly dry. If it is still sweet, try again in 24 hours.
  • When you're happy with the dryness, tighten the cap and put the flagon in the refrigerator (not the freezer!) This will help it to fall clear.

The cider is already ready for drinking, but will look and taste better after a couple of days in the fridge. It doesn't matter if it is not completely clear. There is nothing unwholesome about a little yeast. After all, you eat it every day in bread. Some commercial ciders of the scrumpy style are traditionally served cloudy. Always keep the flagon in the fridge until serving. This prevents any risk of exploding flagons if you've been in too much of a hurry. When serving, pour carefully to avoid disturbing the sediment.

If you have judged your end point well, it will have a slight sparkle when poured, giving a freshness to the taste. If you left it a little too late, it will be still and dry, but perfectly drinkable. On the other hand, if you refrigerated it too soon, it will be sweeter and a little frothy.

...after 24 hours, the liquid will appear frothy (the process will take approximately 5 days).
...after 24 hours, the liquid will appear frothy (the process will take approximately 5 days). | Source
Lalvin Dried Wine Yeast EC #1118 (Pack of 10)
Lalvin Dried Wine Yeast EC #1118 (Pack of 10)

Paraglider suggests: A proper wine yeast will improve the quality of your cider. This one is a quick starter and a good fermenter with a wide temperature tolerance. Originally a Champagne yeast, it clears and settles well. Best of all - it's very cheap!

 

Cider Apples?

Cider apples are different from both dessert and cooking apples. True cider apples are extremely hard, even when ripe. When crushed in a mill, the juice runs clear. The softer dessert and cooking varieties tend to crush to a sloppy pulp with cloudy juice which is no good for cider.

Supermarket apple juices are not made from cider apples, but they are extracted and cleared using hi-tech centrifuge and filtering techniques that are not available to the amateur. Be grateful they have done the hard work for you!

Explanations, Hints, and Tips

This method was designed to work with no special equipment and with baker's yeast. In some parts of the world, such as the Middle East, wine yeast is not available. But if you do have access to wine yeast it will give a higher quality cider.

Sterilisation is vital if you are making cider by traditional methods. However in my method you start with a sealed, sterile juice flagon and ferment in situ opening the top only for the minute it takes to remove some juice and add the yeast. Spoilage is highly unlikely.

Why not stir the yeast in? By floating the yeast on the surface, the growth process starts locally in the concentrated slurry that forms when the yeast absorbs the liquid and re-hydrates. A blanket of carbon dioxide soon forms which forces the air out of the flagon and protects the juice from oxidation. If you stir the yeast in, the start will be slower and the protection less.

Temperature: Warm room temperature is best. Shirt sleeves temperature, if you like. If the juice has been in a fridge, don't start and don't open it until it has warmed up to room temperature.

Sunlight: Yeast doesn't like sunlight. It's best not to place the flagon on the windowsill. Having said that, it doesn't need to be kept in the dark either.

Quantity: One flagon (64 oz or 2 liters) of cider is not very much. If you want to make a larger amount in a single batch, start by kicking off one flagon exactly as described above. When it is going well, say after 48 hours, transfer it to a larger vessel and pour in more juice, remembering to leave a couple of inches air space at the top. Cap it and back off the cap as before, to let gas escape. After that, proceed exactly as with the single flagon. But if you are going to do this, you should sterilise the large vessel before use.

Alternatively, if one flagon isn't enough, start two, three, five, or ten! The great advantage of fermenting in the original container is that there are no sterilisation worries.

Alcoholic Content: The alcoholic strength of this cider depends on the sweetness of the original juice. Typically it will lie in the range 4 to 6% ABV (alcohol by volume), or about the same as a medium-strong beer. You can increase the alcohol by adding sugar at the start, but this increases the chances of stopping the fermentation early, leaving an oversweet drink, because of the relatively low alcohol tolerance of baker's yeast. I prefer to accept the natural strength as it comes.

Still, Flat, or Sparkling: No one talks about still beer. If beer has no bubbles, it is called flat, not still, and flat beer is to nobody's liking. That is because beer is made from grain and contains little or no acid. It needs the carbon dioxide gas to give it sharpness or life. Cider, made from apple juice, contains malic acid. This lends a freshness to the taste, even in the absence of gas. So still cider is an accepted style, while flat beer is always a failure.

Quality: This cider is not meant to win any prizes. Better results can be obtained with fresh apples, wine yeast, and a great deal more work and knowledge. But you can be assured that it is perfectly wholesome, because you know exactly what went into it. No preservatives, no chemicals, just juice and yeast.

Cheers! And thanks for reading!

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Comments 377 comments

GusTheRedneck profile image

GusTheRedneck 5 years ago from USA

Howdy Dave (Paraglider) - A great how-to article, complete with clear directions and accompanied by understandable explanations of the "why-to." Nice stuff. Thanks.

Gus :-)))


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 5 years ago from Houston, Texas

Wow...this really IS easy! Thanks for the explanation of how to make apple cider without "a huge granite mill wheel and channel, and a horse that doesn't mind walking in circles for a few hours." Haha! Rated useful and up.


Pinkchic18 profile image

Pinkchic18 5 years ago from Minnesota

I've never seen this done before, interesting! Thanks!


LiamBean profile image

LiamBean 5 years ago from Los Angeles, Calilfornia

Thanks for helping to revive a very early American drink.

Johnny Appleseed was not spreading apples in America far and wide for ingestion; he did this to encourage the production of cider.


Will Apse profile image

Will Apse 5 years ago

I live out in Thailand and cider has never taken root here, even though they have been growing apples for a long while. If I can find yeast of any kind, I will try this.

This could be a life changing read for expats everywhere. Cold cider and a fiery sunset has to rank high in the pleasures of life!


Cardisa profile image

Cardisa 5 years ago from Jamaica

What an easy way to make something that is obviously tasty and refreshing. Thanks for the recipe and tips!


itakins profile image

itakins 5 years ago from Irl

I like it -brilliant!


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Thanks Gus - just the thing to go with your barbecue sausage!

Peggy - it's as easy as it gets! It's worth trying it with as many different apple juices as you can find, as some turn out better than others.

Thanks Pinkchic, and welcome :)

LiamBeam - absolutely right, and something similar can be said about barley!

Will - Let's just say that my thoughts turned to cider making because of Ramadan in Qatar!

Cardisa - it is, but always serve straight from the fridge.

itakins - thanks, going to try it?


Alice in Wonder profile image

Alice in Wonder 5 years ago from South Texas

Cheers Paraglider! Sounds like a plan.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Thanks Alice - give it a try?


itakins profile image

itakins 5 years ago from Irl

Most certainly-raring to go !


Cagsil profile image

Cagsil 5 years ago from USA or America

Hey Paraglider, I guess I have to go to the store now and get some apple juice and see how well this works out. I haven't drank cider in years, but your hub and it's excellently written format, should provide me with something that will be very interesting to attempt. :) Thank you kindly. :)


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Hi Cagsil and iatkins - let me know how you get on, ok? Just make sure you get a preservative-free juice. A friend and I polished off a flagon last night. Very acceptable :)


jenubouka 5 years ago

Oh finally a great how to guide with out searching for the equipment. I love how to's with what you have, not what you need to get. Awesome thank you!


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

jenubouka - Where I live, in the Middle East, wine and cider making equipment is not available, so I've devised methods for both that need nothing unusual or specialised. I hope it works for you!


jenubouka 5 years ago

Middle East? in usa or over seas?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Qatar, Arabia, in the Gulf. So very over seas, yes :)


pistolpete 5 years ago

this is a wonderful article. i have been wanting brew some beer since i have been in riyadh, but theres just too much special equipment and ingredients to make it practical. i can't believe i never thought of cider! i kicked off a batch a few days ago, ill post up some results next week. Thanks for the advice!


jenubouka 5 years ago

My family is from lebanon. We are pratically neighbors! well not really but I will defiantly be looking for your articles


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

pistolpete - there's not a lot to go wrong with this method as it is so simple. Some juices have a better flavour than others, that's all. Good luck.

jenubouka - most welcome. I've not been to Lebanon but have many Lebanese colleagues here in Doha.


SafGold 5 years ago

I can only find Saf Gold Yeast in my area so, i am using it and did three batches today let you know the result in few.


lovelypaper profile image

lovelypaper 5 years ago from Virginia

Thanks for explaining this. The best cidar I ever had I tasted at a gift shop at the beach. It costed almost $10 for a little carton!


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

At $10 a carton, it's got to be worth making your own!


Grumpy Goat 5 years ago

Cloudy and dry.

This is not a weather report, but my first try at any form of home brew. Maybe I'll stop it a little earlier next time, and see if I can make it a little sweeter.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Hi GG - dry is fine, but cloudy suggests too short a time in fridge, maybe? Anyway, how did it taste? The cider house in Elmley Castle serves in china mugs so you can't tell if it's cloudy or clear!


livelonger profile image

livelonger 5 years ago from San Francisco

I'm going to have to try this. Thanks for the detailed directions and pictures. I'm a fan of fermented foods, and this process seems easy enough.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Hi livelonger - it's certainly easy. I haven't had a failed batch yet. The main quality factor seems to be the brand of apple juice, and strangely, I've found that the better juices (for drinking) don't make the best cider. The apple flavour is too strong. Cheaper, blander juices turn out more authentic. Good luck :)


livelonger profile image

livelonger 5 years ago from San Francisco

Interesting - that's a good tip, since it will save me money, too!


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Mine works out at 3 Riyals a pint (about 75 cents) while the bar prices in Qatar are ten times that amount. So it's got to be worth doing!


livelonger profile image

livelonger 5 years ago from San Francisco

Wow...talk about cheap tipple! ;) And I suppose you're right that you don't want cider to have too much of an apple flavor; it might be cloying.


SafGold 5 years ago

Ok, failed with the first try very harsh kind taste and bread kind smell so in next try i put very small piece of cinnamon now eventually all is well.. Saf Gold Yeast also worked..


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

There's nothing magic about cinnamon, but if you like the taste of it that's fine! I deleted your second comment because I don't want outgoing links.


parks 5 years ago

been fermenting for a few days now... getting excited :p has a slight vinegar smell though, im afraid it might have oxidized....


Attikos profile image

Attikos 5 years ago from East Cackalacky

This is a delightful DIY article! I'm always looking for ways to provide life's simple needs myself without paying some overgrown business complex to do it for me. Your method is right down the alley.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

parks - fermenting juice always has a slightly acidic smell because of the CO2. 'A few days' is long enough. Taste it. If the sweetness is gone, refrigerate it.

Attikos - thanks, good luck with the first brew :)


parks 5 years ago

Cool thanks man. makes me feel a bit better. one more question..... i did add some extra sugar at the start. its been three days almost to the minute, but its still bubbling up pretty nicely. a bit more sour than sweet, but the sweetness is deff there for sure. fridge it or one more day?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

I'd give it another day. Three days is enough for natural juice in my warm Gulf climate. But if it's still bubbling happily, give it more time.


ollie 5 years ago

Just wondering if any apple juice that says 'pure' is suitable as long as it is in a plastic bottle...

Its just i saw some own brand in a plastic milk style bottle and thought it might work?


SafGold 5 years ago

I did another experiment, i am very happy and satisfied its easy and fast also the taste is GOOD. All i did is create a natural starter using brown raisins and used against dry yeast follow your steps here is the detail:

1. Buy 1.5 Mineral Water and Remove .5 litter Water

2. Add 10 Spoons Sugar

3. Add 50 Raisins

4. Shake Well

5. Put the cap on and tight fully

And that is it!

Now..

* Every 24hour for next 7days, must remove the gas from the bottle (press the bottle to make sure it can be easily pressed) so process can continue by moving cap a little bit around and never remove the cap all the way then tight fully back, after releasing the gas from the bottle. After 7days just use half cup per 5 litter or two spoons per litter!


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Ollie - It would probably work, but if the juice has not been pasteurised there's slightly more chance of it spoiling.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

SatGold - that's using the natural yeast on the raisin skins and growing it on. It's not guaranteed to work for all raisins, but if you enjoy experimenting it's well worth the small risk. As it's a true wine yeast, the taste could well turn out better than the baker's yeast.


SatGold 5 years ago

When I fully tight the cap on third day and leave the bottle for 12hours, it was impossible to even pressed and then I put in refrigerator now taste is perfect.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Nice success story - thanks :)


Ollie 5 years ago

2 days ago I bought some 'Copella' cloudy apple juice. I thought i'd get it as it said its just like home made stuff. It says its pure and free from all sorts of preservatives etc. It has bubbled and frothed alot, so im pretty sure its working. But theres orangey brown gunk forming at the top and sticking to the sides. It might just be left over yeast or whatever i'd just like to know what it actually is and what i should do about it.

Another quick response would be great :) Thanks


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

It's just yeast. Don't worry about it. when you pour it, it will stick to the sides and not come into the glass.


joy 5 years ago

So i mixed up a batch of cider yesterday and the bottle was expanding a lot, so i have been slightly loosening the cap to release gas and then retightening. I just came home and attempted to do this and the cider exploded all over my kitchen...pretty funny but i'd rather not have that happen again hah should i not open it at all next time?


Will Apse profile image

Will Apse 5 years ago

My first batch was very enjoyable- like a very dry white wine with an apple after hit. I have graduated to a 5 litre container.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Joy - throughout the fermentation process, the cap should remain slightly backed off, to let the gas out. I do say that in the method. Anyway, now you know why!!

Will - Glad my method has made it to Thailand :)


Ollie 5 years ago

has anyone tried it with 'cloudy apple juice'. ive just put mine in the fridge and it looks disgusting XD. smells slightly cider-like so it might work ;)


Joy 5 years ago

Aahh i misunderstood that bit, thanks for the quick response.


honeyren04 5 years ago

my husband was very happy when he read this article..we are living right now in the middle east and alcohol is strictly prohibited..he is so excited and this time we are doing it..wish us good luck..and i hope this first cider is going to be a huge success..thanks a lot..


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

There's not much can go wrong with this method as it's so simple. Good luck :)


CulinaryFool profile image

CulinaryFool 5 years ago

I never knew that making cider could be this easy. Thanks for sharing!


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Thanks, CF, hope it works for you :)


AlmostLola profile image

AlmostLola 5 years ago

I've looking for an easy cider recipe. Thanks for sharing.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

This is as easy as it gets :)


Hadi Akberali 5 years ago

Hey Paraglider, I also live in a country where there is no access to wine yeast! So, I decided to get fresh apples and juiced them instead of using the clear and less viscous supermarket apple juice. I've put the yeast in already about an hour ago. Will it work? I don't see too much activity.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Hadi - it should work, but the risk of spoilage is higher because the juice (and your equipment) might not be sterile. If you're going to use fresh fruit, you should really apply sterilisation techniques. I discuss this on my winemaking hubs.


LeanMan profile image

LeanMan 5 years ago from At the Gemba

I bought a large batch of wine yeast into Saudi disguised as "gravy powder" with various other provisions..

I have enjoyed cider many times although I tend to add a little extra sugar to boost the strength in line with the capabilities of the yeast. I also have tended to make slightly larger batches, normally having 4 or 5 five gallon water containers on the go at any one time so that I don't run out of any socially unacceptable but totally necessary drinks!

I have never sold my beer / wine / cider despite many asking to buy, I think that would be looking for trouble, but share with friends quite generously.. many of my friends being Saudi who will often turn up with a bottle or two of black label to go with the other drinks.. I love the saudi way of life..lol

As to cider getting back to your hub, this method is great for just about any form or flavor of fruit juice, you can even drop a few grains of yeast into the top of bottles of No-Alcohol beer with a spoonful or three of sugar for a more refreshing drink (mixed with a fresh bottle of beer will give you back a little fizz if you don't like it flat.)


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Hi LeanMan - the best thing about this method is that it is almost guaranteed to work because the chances of spoilage are minimal. And it's completely scalable - if you want a bigger batch, just start more flagons!

I agree with you about sales though. That would be pushing your luck just too far. The authorities couldn't turn a blind eye to a brewing business.


Elizabeth02206 profile image

Elizabeth02206 5 years ago from Boston, Massachusetts

This is awesome! Perfect for the holiday season coming up. Thanks for sharing.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Thanks Elizabeth, I hope it works for you :)


Jack 5 years ago

The method has made it to Australia! First three litres just started. Will let you know in a few days how it went.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

That's good - I see no reason why it shouldn't work down under!


Scotty 5 years ago

Thanks for this i'm just about to refrigerate my first batch then i'm going to try the white grape wine, should be nice and ready by christmas.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Scotty, yes, if you start in the next day or two, you can get a white wine ready for Christmas. Good luck!


Dr. Corollary 5 years ago

This could prove to be very valuable for a handful of reasons you probably know, with the short production time being my personal favorite. Will naturally experiment with a few brands and maybe minor amounts of added sugar. First toast goes to you.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Dr Corollary, the fast turnaround is a nice feature. From one weekend to the next. If you're going to add sugar, best make it into a syrup first, rather than adding crystals. Good luck.


Kristen 5 years ago

Hi Paraglider, I'm really keen to try your method. Just a question about temperature: what is 'warm room temperature'/'shirt sleeves temperature'? I live in Asia where the room temp is 25-30 degrees celcius, is that an ok temperature for making cider? Thanks :)


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Kristen, 25 to 30C is perfect. You should have a nice quick fermentation in that temperature range. Good luck :)


Kristen 5 years ago

Thanks! Will try it next weekend and let you know how it goes. Am really excited :)


Scotty 4 years ago

Paraglider, this stuff is absolutly lovely the only problem is that everyone likes it so in 3 weeks i aint seen one clear pint even if i filter it... i have been using a 5 liter container firstly with 3 liters of juice to one teaspoon of yeast then after 48 hours i've added another 1.5 liters of juice.... problem is my friends and family want some for the christmas period so can you suggest a recipe for a bigger batch? i have a 40 pint container here but not sure how to go about it....


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Since we're just using supermarket juice and no extra sugar, there's nothing much to go wrong, provided everything is properly clean. If you want a 5 gallon batch, start off as if making one gallon. When it is fermenting strongly, pour it into the 5 gall vessel and add nearly 4 more gallons. Just hold back from over filling it until the fermentation has calmed, then top it up. Alternatively, just start a dozen 2-litre flagons separately, in their original containers. Less heavy lifting involved!


JeddahNoob 4 years ago

i'm finished my first try.., the taste is sour like vinegar..


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

With no sugar left to balance it, the malic acid in the apple juice will feature in the taste, but if there is a real vinegar taste you have had infection by acetobacter, a bacteria that converts ethanol to acetic acid. This is nearly always carried by fruit flies. Are you sure there's a vinegar taste and smell, or maybe you just don't like cider?


Evs 4 years ago

Hi there. I've just started off four bottles of your method, but as I sprinkled it in, the yeast didn't stay on the surface - most of it sank to the bottom. Is that still OK? Also, I live in a hot country but our house inside is quite cold - obviously the houses here are designed to keep the heat out. Do I need to try to warm the room the bottles are in a little bit, or will it be OK?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Hi Evs - it won't be a problem. Some yeasts float more easily than others, but it will still start. There should be no need to heat the room. If it is cool, it will take an extra day or two to finish but that's also fine.


Evs 4 years ago

Thanks alot. It's been 24 hours but nothing's started happening yet - I'm guessing you will just tell me to be patient!?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Patient is good, but if it doesn't start within 48 hrs there could be something wrong, e.g. preservatives in the juice or old yeast? Dried yeast has a shelf life and doesn't last forever, especially if it gets damp.


senorapata profile image

senorapata 4 years ago from Southern California

Thank you for the easy recipe. I really enjoy apple cider, but it tends to be too seasonal. Now I can have it whenever I choose.


Fern 4 years ago

Could you do a similar thing with non alcoholic beer, adding sugar and bakers yeast? if so what kind of amounts would you recommend?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Senorapata - this method is certainly all year round. The only difference is that it takes a little longer to ferment in the cooler times.

Fern, around 70 grams/litre and 1/4 tsp yeast per litre. But there's no great saving to be made as alcohol free beer is not much cheaper than normal beer, whereas apple juice is a lot cheaper than cider.


Shaddie profile image

Shaddie 4 years ago from Washington state

This hub is wonderfully informative, I simply must try it sometime! Though I do have one question, would microwaving or boiling a mug full of this stuff reduce the quality of it at all? I know I certainly do not enjoy cold cider.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Don't boil it or you'll drive off the alcohol. If you like a mulled wine style, you could warm it and stir in some cloves and cinnamon, sugar or honey to taste.


Shaddie profile image

Shaddie 4 years ago from Washington state

That sounds excellent! Thanks for the tip.


Evs 4 years ago

Thanks alot for the advice. Much appreciated. I think you're very kind answering every single persons questions individually. I moved the bottles to a warmer room and they started bubbling away. They are still going FIVE DAYS after I first started them. Looking forward to a taste or 10 soon - have had nada for weeks here in the dryest of dry countries.... thanks again. I'll report back on the results.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Five days is fine in a cooler place. You can taste it for dryness and stick it in the fridge with the cap tightened as soon as you're happy that most of the sweetness has gone.


Evs 4 years ago

I just had a sneaky taste and I think it still tastes quite sweet, so I'll leave it another day or so. It's still bubbling quite alot too. CAn one spoil things by leaving it too long before putting it in the fridge?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

As long as it is pushing out gas it is pretty well protected (by the CO2 blanket) and should come to no harm. When the bubbling stops, or a little before, get it into the fridge right away.


AhmadButt profile image

AhmadButt 4 years ago

Will I have to increase the amount of baker's yeast too if I increase quantity of the sugar in order to increase the strength a bit?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

No. The small yeast addition grows by replication until there is an equilibrium between rate of replication and rate of dying. So it doesn't make much difference how much you add at the start.


latic_8 4 years ago

could I decant into 500ml bottles with a little priming sugar to produce a clearer sparkling cider?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

latic - yes, you could. Make sure the bottles are strong enough to take the pressure. One 'standard' sugar cube is about right, if you've allowed the main fermentation to finish.


latic_8 4 years ago

Fantastic! I have some bottles that I use for homebrew lager. Thanks Para I'm off to give it a go,I'll let you know how it goes.


latic_8 4 years ago

Hi Paraglider,I have started 5 litres and will decant into bottles with priming sugar.How long do you think it will keep before going off?


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

I would keep it at room temp for a couple of days after priming and sealing, then move it to a cooler place for storage. It should be OK for 2 months at least but if you want to keep it longer you should be thinking about sulphiting it.


Biochemist 4 years ago

Thanks for a wonderfully useful instruction! Being a professor of biochemistry I know the chemical details of glycolysis and alcohol fermentation, but was unsure about the type of yeast to use, sugar contents, etc. I set up a half gallon of Martinelli's apple juice with added sugar (final 19.2 Brix), a half teaspoon of baker's dry yeast and a primitive homemade airlock (a straw, a long balloon and some candlewax :)). I'll let it ferment for a few days to a week and let uou know how it went...


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Biochemist - nice to hear from a professional! Most amateur brewers/winemakers use Specific Gravity or Original Gravity rather than Brix, as the hydrometer is a very cheap and easy tool to use.

I believe 19.2 Brix is around 1.080 SG. This is not going to ferment out in less than 3 weeks as it is a very high OG for cider. 80 is about right for a table wine. Baker's yeast might not be able to finish the job without additional yeast nutrients. I suggest you look at my wine-making hubs as well. Good luck :)


Andrew 4 years ago

I just tried this for the first time, enjoying my third glass now! I've been making home brew beer and cider from kits for a good few years. Alcohol is highly taxed in Australia and cider ends up costing about 12 dollars a liter or more. I like to work as little as possible. I just made two litres for 2 dollars, I saved myself a whole hour of toil at the old boomerang factory. Also, Australian alcoholic drink labels don't tell you the ingredients so you really don't know what you're drinking. This stuff tastes great and I know it is free of gluten. Oh, I used white wine yeast because it is readily available here and added about 2 tablespoons of sugar to two litres juice to put a bit more edge on the strength.

I also love this method because it cuts out the most labor intensive and water consuming bit of home brewing, sterilizing the bottles.

I think I'll experiment with adding a bit of sugar after fermentation settles, cranking the lid down tight, and leaving it out of the fridge for a few more days. That oughta make it a little bit fizzy. I let you know how it works.


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

That will certainly give it a sparkle. Be careful though, you don't need much sugar to prime a bottle. No bombs please :)


Donz 4 years ago

Thanks for this :) I'm making homemade wine but I'm not very patient so this is a fast alternative to quench my thirst inbetween waiting for my wine :) and no special yeast to make it better... again thank you!


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

It's certainly faster than wine, especially in hot climates such as here in Qatar.


daniel 4 years ago

I've got to share our experience with this recipe.

I tried it first. I let the juice ferment for nearly three days before I put it in the fridge. It fell beautifully clear and had a dry taste. I tested the alcohol content with a refraction device and it read about 2%.

My wife liked the product so much that she made the next batch. Same brand of juice. She let it ferment for 48 hours. As you would expect, it's less dry. As you would not expect, it has a higher alcohol content at about 3.5%! It has stayed cloudy but it's got great sparkle and we both agree that hers tastes better than mine. I just don't understand why the alcohol content is greater.

Thanks Paraglider. We'll be doing this again very soon.


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Temperature has a lot to do with it. I don't know where you live, but if the nights are cold you will have dormant hours when nothing is happening. I would always let it ferment until nearly exhausted, then refrigerate. Anyway, there's nothing wrong with a cloudy drink. I've just had a few pints of German weissbier. Quite relaxed now :-)


Jimbo 4 years ago

I've had great success with this, it's very hot in Western Australia and my apple juice turned into cider in a week. Just like the Somerset farm cider I used to buy as a lad many years ago. 50 pence a gallon if I remember right! Thanks for posting this. J


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Here in Qatar I can make it for 40 riyals a gallon which is more or less a gallon for the price of a pint in the bars. It must be one of the most cost effective hobbies!


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Nare Anthony 4 years ago

Oh wow!!! This is my "Hub of the day". Extremely wel written, interesting, it's like a combination of information and art! Love it! Surely gonna make. Voted up and everything else!


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Thanks Nare :) Come back and let us know how your first batch turns out!


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Vegas Elias 4 years ago from Mumbai

Hi, I read this article in detail and with practical interest. I will actually try making some cider at home.


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

It's a very easy method. I'm sure it will work for you :)


Benny big bananas 4 years ago

You, good sir, are a genius


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Thanks Benny :)


Benny big bananas 4 years ago

BTW, how long will my cider last in the fridge, after it's finished doin its thing?


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

If you pour it into a new flagon, leaving the sediment behind, it will keep in the fridge for a good couple of months (if it gets the chance!)


Khalea 4 years ago

Exactly how much should I back off the cap? Is there anyway to tell and what happens if I back it off too much


spado 4 years ago

Do I have to put it in the fridge after I bottle it? Or can I just seal it up tightly and store. It wouldn't sit around more than a couple weeks.


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Khalea - enough for the gas to escape. Not so much that you can lift the cap straight off.

Spado - No problem. Just be sure that it's not still sweet when you bottle it or the pressure could build up and burst the bottles.


spado 4 years ago

Cool thanks man mine should be done within the next 48 hours can't wait to try it!


Philemon 4 years ago

Thanks for the great instructions for cider making! I just started my first batch and had a quick question. Most of the yeast sank to the bottom pretty much immediately. I notice in your instructions and pics the slurry forming at the top of the container that helps produce CO2 and protect the cider from oxidation. I am not using a narrow necked container as pictured and perhaps that is the problem. My question is if this is going to be a lost batch if the yeast does not stay on top and should I just start over sooner rather than later?


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

There shouldn't be any problem provided you keep the jar covered (but not airtight!) When the fermentation gets underway, the rising bubbles keep the yeast in suspension.


Philemon 4 years ago

Thanks for the quickk reply! Things are fermenting along nicely even without the slurry on the top. After about a half day I found the bottle laying on its side as the base had been deformed by the pressure despite the fact that I had backed the cap off a quarter turn. Is this normal? I released some pressure by opening the cap a little more and then resetting the cap to the suggested position. The bottle remains rock hard this morning. Should I perodically release gas to prevent a rupture or am I ok to leave it just with the cap backed off a quarter turn?


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Sounds like you've got a self sealing cap. Back it off more until the gas can escape freely. The aim is to let the gas out but not let any fruit flies in.


Philemon 4 years ago

Well my first batch is done! I think it turned out ok - but honestly it has been a long time since I have had a cider. I also live and work in the middle east and when I was back home I was more a beer guy than cider. My results after fermenting for 3 days and chilling for 1/2 a day:

Pours a slightly hazy pale gold with lots of tiny bubbles. Very light nose just a hint of apples. Light effervescent mouthfeel. A bit tart. Jam assuming this is normal and that if the batch were off it would have both an offensives odorous and a very sour taste - is that true? How would I tell if it oxidizized or were infected?

All in all I think it was a decent first effort. I have a second batch started to see if I can repeat the results. Thanksgiving so much for the great directions and support!


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Sounds fine. It will clear more if you leave it in the fridge longer. Maybe give the next batch 4 days fermenting to be slightly stronger/flatter/drier. All comes down to taste :)


Wes 4 years ago

Fun stuff, but bakers yeast is generally not the best thing for fermenting beverages. If you're looking to kick this up a notch, go get yourself a 22 oz bottle of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale and pour most of the beer into a glass. At the bottom there will be a layer of yeast. You can use this to make a starter culture by putting it in a sterile glass container along with some sugar and yeast nutrient. Let it sit for a day or two and you'll have a nice slurry of happy brewers yeast ready to go to work on your apple juice. Now drink the beer, if you haven't already. Cheers!


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Hi Wes - I'm familiar with growing yeast cultures from the lees of real ales, but I'm writing from Qatar where there are no alcoholic beverages in the shops. Baker's yeast doesn't make a good wine as a general rule, but for cider it does pretty well if used as per my method.


tracecidermaker 4 years ago

Paraglider, Thank you so much for this cider receipe, I live in Egypt where you can not get cider, or when you do you pay stupid prices for it.

I make my cider in a 6 litre water bottle, I use 5 litres of pure apple juice and half a teaspoon of yeast, when it has finished bubbling, I then transfer to another 6 litre water bottle and add 1 teaspoon of sugar, where I then put it in the fridge overnight.

This makes a slightly sparkling cider which is really really nice.

So much so that I cannot make it quick enough!

Thank you so much for all your advice


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Glad it's working for you :) I use the original 2 litre containers to minimise the risk of any contamination, but really the risk is small provided your water bottles are scrupulously clean and fresh.


John 4 years ago

I'm trying this in Thailand now. I'm using a recycled plastic milk flagon (all the juice out here is sold in paper cartons). As a cheap pressure release / non-return valve I bought a baby feeding bottle teat, cut a ring in the plastic top of the flagon, inserted the teat and: Bingo! It seals perfectly with the flagon top, it comes pre-sterilised, and the CO2 vents under slight positive pressure.

Just waiting for the results...


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vespawoolf 4 years ago from Peru, South America

In Peru, we can only find apple juice sold in cardboard cartons, but occasionally find imported juice in a plastic bottle. Next time I see it, I'm going to buy the imported juice and give this a try! I love innovative recipes like yours. Keep up the good work!


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

John and Vespawoolf - Thailand and Peru! My Qatar cider is fast going all round the World :)

As mentioned, make sure the apple juice has no preservatives and the plastic fermenting bottle thoroughly clean and it should turn out fine. Good luck!


N1kadz 4 years ago

Trying this at the moment and seems to be going well. Im using a hydromemter and it wont drop below 1.020 and sound like its fizzing like mad


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

As it's still fermenting, just give it time. The gravity will drop further as more sugar is used up.


Dude 4 years ago

Do u have a reciepes for alcoholic ginger beer i liv that stuff but duno how to make it


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Use the cider method as above, but add two teaspoons finely chopped and crushed fresh ginger root at the start, when you add the yeast. The ginger will dominate the taste. Don't try using ginger alone as it contains no sugar. Use apple juice as the base.


Dude 4 years ago

Is that per litre


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

It doesn't really matter. Depends how much ginger flavour you like. I'd try a heaped teaspoon per litre first, and after the first batch decide if you want more or less flavour


N1k 4 years ago

Drank my cider lastnite. Was ok but not like strongbow like i usualy drink . Styl good tho. Sediment was loose so as soon as i poured the bottle it floated back up but settled at the bottom of the glass after a couple of hours back int fridge.


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

I always pour the whole flagon into an empty one at a single pass, which leaves most of the sediment behind. Glad you enjoyed it.


David Carver 4 years ago

Just made the first batch. Turned out a bit tarter than I wanted, when I tasted it but hoping this settles out as it cold crashes. Overall though, the process was dirt simple to follow, I just need to keep a better eye on when the fermentation process starts to slow down to time the cold crashing appropriately.


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Hi David - If you have the patience to keep it in the fridge for a couple of weeks, it does mellow quite a bit, especially if you pour it off the lees after about three days chilling, then reseal and chill for longer.


Boozeman 4 years ago

Do u no how to make lager


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

I do, but I prefer to go to the bar for my beer. At home, I just like making wine and cider.


David Carver 4 years ago

Yeah, it did settle quite a bit over the last couple of weeks. Tried some Motts Pressed juice, and it took it quite a bit longer to finish fermenting. So far the cider I've produced has gotten thumbs up. Thanks again for the article.


Bemo 4 years ago

Hi Paraglider..I live in Khobar (it is dry here) and your recipe is a lifesaver :) here is my feedback:

I made two batches, each 1.5 L, both kept at 23c. The one without sugar stopped after 8 days of fermentation, the one with sugar stopped after 10 days. The one without sugar has a low alcohol content maybe about 1-2 ABV. The one with sugar has much higher alcohol maybe 4.5-6 ABV. The taste was really good better than I expected, but it has an acidic flavor.

Paraglider Cider - No Sugar

0.25 teaspoon yeast / L Apple

Paraglider Cider - With Sugar

0.25 teaspoon yeast / L Apple

70g Sugar / L


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Hi Bemo - I did six months in Al Khobar too, a few years ago. I'd be surprised if an 8 day fermentation produced only 2% ABV. How are you measuring ABV? What brand of apple juice are you using?


Bemo 4 years ago

I am a beginner here.. this is my second time brewing..I don't have a hydrometer. I am just guessing the ABV, so my measurement is FAR from accurate. I am using Almarai apple. The alcohol in my cider was there but it was low..I could drink it like water, but the one with sugar was stronger like beer or maybe stronger.


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

OK, that makes sense. In the Gulf, most beers are 5%. Once used to that, you really can drink 3% like water. I'd guess your weaker brew would be around the 3 to 3.5% mark and the stronger one up around 5.5%. Anyway, it's worth experimenting with different juices, sugar etc, till you hit what's ideal for you.


dianetrotter profile image

dianetrotter 4 years ago from Fontana

Does it taste like Martinelli's Apple Cider? I love apple cider but don't drink it often because of the calories.


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

I don't know Martinelli's, but it certainly tastes like cider, because that's exactly what cider is - fermented apple juice :)


dianetrotter profile image

dianetrotter 4 years ago from Fontana

Martinelli's taste like a carbonated drink. The label says apple cider. Maybe it is not really apple cider.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

I guess you might be in America? In Europe, if it says cider on the label, it has to be cider, by law.


dianetrotter profile image

dianetrotter 4 years ago from Fontana

Yep! Probably a lot of things here are different. I'm told that the Mexican food here is not real Mexican food.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Interesting. Also any genetically modified products have to be clearly labeled to give consumers the choice.


Farmer Rachel profile image

Farmer Rachel 4 years ago from Minnesota

Very cool! Love the simplicity.


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Simple is good, sometimes :)


whowas 4 years ago

That is surely a stroke of genius. I see that the necessity of finding something to drink in a country where drink is probably banned - or at least very tightly controlled - has truly proved the mother of invention. And in this cider making method you have everything covered from sterility of equipment to simplicity of process to a desired product. Add to that your beautiful and amusing writing style and I not only learned something fascinating but found doing so a very enjoyable experience in itself. Thank you! Voted up, ticked and shared. :) As we say in England on raising a convivial glass amongst friends: cheers!


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Cheers indeed :-) Thank you for that. Another plus for this method is its low 'water footprint', something that is starting to gain attention. i.e. you use no water in the process, unlike the more traditional approach of sterilising demijohns, etc.


BlueDevil 4 years ago

Paraglider,

Thank you so much for your informative, concise, and well-written guide to home-made cider! You can add Kuwait to the list of countries " 'Glider Cider" can be found... after reading about prison wine (pruno) in US jails and lamenting that even prisoners back home can get their hands on alcohol while we in the middle east must struggle, I found your hubs on cider and wine. Within 5 minutes, I had popped out to the nearest co-op and purchased the exact same yeast and juice (SAF instant and Nadec Apple, respectively) as pictured and 3 days in it's bubbling away. Can't wait to try it; it smells great so far, but I think it will be best to let the "Glider Cider" ferment for another day or two.

A question for you: I've also purchased a flagon of Nadec Lemonade, and I am wondering if I utilized the same process, could I safely yield hard lemonade? I'm a big fan of Mike's Hard Lemonade, and to make some homebrew middle eastern lemonade would be great.


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

BlueDevil - glad it's working in Kuwait too! Not sure about the lemonade though. It might work, but only if there are no preservatives and if the sweetness is all sugar, i.e. not artificial sweetener. Also the dissolved Carbon Dioxide could inhibit the yeast. I'd suggest making it go flat before starting, by shaking/stirring to drive off the bubbles. And, as the lemonade is likely to be entirely synthetic, there might not be enough natural nutrients for the yeast to grow. But by all means try it. There's nothing to lose.


BlueDevil 4 years ago

Update: the Nadec Lemon with Mint is what I tried, and after 3 days it had carbonation but didn't seem to have as much alcohol content as the apple. I've also just made some cider with the Nadec Mixed Berry and that seems to work really well also, but that apple is still the best. Thanks again for everything.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Check the fine print on the label for the sugar content in grams /litre which correlates with the potential alcohol content of the finished cider. Come to think of it, maybe I should explain that in a partner hub.


Ross 4 years ago

Wondering why you shouldn't use juice from a cardboard carton? I can't get any plastic flagons where i am..


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Ross - you can use juice from a cardboard carton but don't ferment it in the cardboard. Transfer it into glass or plastic first.


Attikos profile image

Attikos 4 years ago from East Cackalacky

Paraglider, I've tried your method several times now. It works like a charm. Not a failure yet.

I do find that adding a handful of raisins to the juice raises the alcohol level and improves the taste of the finished cider.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Attikos - There are many possible variations that can make improvements. I keep my published method as simple as possible (no extras) to almost guarantee success, but ring the changes a lot when making my own. You might also like to try adding a tablespoon of clear honey, when the fermentation is beginning to slow down.

Raisins are rich in sugar and will increase the alcohol yield, especially if you chop and crush them first. They also have natural yeast nutrients that can help the fermentation along.


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Icematikx 4 years ago from United Kingdom, Staffordshire

Now I just need to learn how to make Strongbow! :D


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iguidenetwork 4 years ago from Austin, TX

Great hub!


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Icematikx - If you take any commercial brand as your model, you will always be disappointed because even if 'better' it will still be different and therefore only a partial success. Just keep trying small variations until you find your ideal version. (And Stowford Press knocks spots off Strongbow!)


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 4 years ago from Central United States of America

Interesting instructions, recipe, tips and advice! Would love a cold glassful right now!


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Amberjewell 4 years ago

Can you warm it up in the winter? I may acutally try this. Thanks for the receipe!


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

frogyfish - start now and you'll have a cold glass or three next weekend!

Amberjewell - In winter, it will ferment in any room you can comfortably sit in yourself. It just might take a day or two longer. You should still keep it in the fridge when finished. If you want to warm it up for drinking, no problem.


Pret 4 years ago

Hi i work in Saudi and i could not find any wine yeast but i got some baking yeast. I started on my first batch now but i changed your recipe a little i added 400 grams of sugar to 1 liter of water and mixed it with the apple juice i am very curios how much will it take to stop fermentation? I ask this because i come from a country where you can freely brew your alcoholic drink and there i have made cider from fresh apple without helping it with yeast and it has taken 30-45 days to ferment naturally and it had a pretty high alcoholic concentration about 12% i am wandering if with your method if i let the mixture ferment as much wat will happen or because i added the yeast it will ferment faster.


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

The apple juice probably contains about 120 g/l sugar. If you've mixed it 1:1 with your sugar syrup, you're looking at 260 g/l sugar. You might manage to ferment that to dryness with a good wine yeast but baker's yeast won't finish the job. In that concentration it might not even start! I'd predict an early stuck fermentation and an oversweet result.

By the way - at home, you are not fermenting without yeast; you are relying on naturally present yeast. It can work, but it's always safer to add a known yeast starter and be in control of the process.


pret 4 years ago

Thanks for the fast reply .

The mixture is already fermenting and now i am on the second day of fermentation so the first part of your fear did not happen but about the second part i was afraid too so that is why i want to know how many days you think it will ferment?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Well, if you really are fermenting from an original sugar concentration of 260 g/l, it would take typically a month to ferment through to near dryness. But with baker's yeast, packaged juice and no added nutrients, I would not expect it to go all the way. It may well stick in a few days time. If it does, I'd start another batch with no added sugar and when it's going well, gradually add your stuck one to the active one. Good luck.


pret 4 years ago

thanks

The thing i forgot to tell you is the temperature at witch the mixture is fermenting, and that is pretty high 25-30 celsius (77-86 Fahrenheit ) and at home it was fermenting at 10-15 celsius (50-58 Fahrenheit )

to be honest i am not rely interested in the quality of the drink now :) . I am more interested in a higher alcohol concentration and if it will ferment faster and what are my chances too get vinegar this is my main concern because i do not wish to ferment it to that point if i am lucky and the fermentation process dose not stop early . After this batch i will try to get some quality too and to do that i really need your advice because as u know in saudi u can't find any brewer yeasts and i do not want to gamble with growing my own yeast from unwashed fruits because for sure the yeast will get contaminated by the substances the producers spray on them to be protected from insects.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Pret - At these temperatures the process is pretty quick but try not to exceed 30 or you risk killing it off.

Using baker's yeast, 150 g/l should be your maximum sugar content. That will yield around 7% ABV if you ferment it through. Instead of trying for higher alcohol yield, why not just make more and have another pint?

Vinegar does not come from fermenting too long. It comes from bacterial spoilage usually by bacteria carried by fruit flies. If you use my method this is very unlikely to happen.


pret 4 years ago

Thanks again and i will tray to keep you up to date with my progress. I will go get some more juice and add only sugar to get to your suggested value 150 g/l because the nadec juice has low sugar content as i know ( i did not find the actual proportion of sugar it contains per liter on the label)

"Pret - At these temperatures the process is pretty quick but try not to exceed 30 or you risk killing it off." you mean it can take around how many days? 10-15 or more or even faster

Ps. i can't do much about the temperature because if i use the AC in that room the temperature will be uncontrollable due to the draft it creates . At least now i keep the temperature stable between those values only by letting some cold air entering from the other rooms.


Debbie N Marshall 4 years ago

Is priming sugar just regular sugar? I am looking to make a sparkling, dry cider around 8%

I am new to this :)


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Pret - With baker's yeast at nearly 30C, I'd expect one week max to ferment out from 150 g/l

Debbie - just the same, ordinary granulated sugar/


Debbie N Marshall 4 years ago

Thanks.... Just started my first batch :D


pret 4 years ago

Hi again the first 3 liter batch it is almost stopping the fermentation now bubbles in my air lock system are coming once every 15-20 sec what is your advice leave it until there are no more bubbles or stop it now?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Just stop it now, in the fridge. Taste it to see if it has fermented nearly all the sugar out or if it has just run out of steam.


mike 4 years ago

I could only find tetrapaks of apple juice (though with screw top lids). Would the juice ferment in these or do you think there would be a nasty taste? If I have to decant into empty plastic water bottles could I just pour what I have already started in the tetrapak or should I just start again? Cheers


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Mike - I'd suggest pouring it into plastic bottles for two reasons - you'll see what is going on, and I'm not sure that the seams in the tetrapack would hold up when alcohol starts to appear in the juice. Think of what happens when you pour spirits into a cardboard cup - it starts to seep. Best not risk it.


pret 4 years ago

At last my first 3 liter batch, done after 9-10 days of fermentation and i can tell you it is awesome very close to the version made from fresh apples . As i drink it now i can feel it has more than 10% alcohol .

Thank you very much Paraglider for your suggestions and good luck to every1 else that wants to try it!


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Pret - It sounds like you have been lucky with a bread yeast that has tolerated high sugar content - what I now suggest is keep some of the lees to start your next batch. Because not all bread yeast will reach so high. Cheers!


Ady 4 years ago

Hi Paraglider, thanks for such an awesome DIY! I've never tried cider before, very excited to taste my experiment ...!

I'm going with 17L of juice (CAESAR), poured altogether in plastic water bottle (5 gallons, seal opened, water out juice in). It's fermenting fine but I have two questions:

1. For more quantity you've suggested a two step process (starting small and later adding more juice) OR doing more bottles separately; what do you think abt my way?

2. While adding the yeast to the bottle I could not remain gentle, I tried but the yeast formed a thick dry layer on top which was not hydrating (I had to add more yeast) so I shake it a bit to let the whole yeast hydrate..... Is it ok??? How much yeast I should have added?

Your response will be awaited...

BTW, have you ever tried Caesars juice...?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Ady - I haven't used Caesar juice but I've seen it often on the shelves. Should be fine as it has no preservatives and states 109 g/l sugar which should ferment through to around 5%.

Your way will work but is not ideal because, as you saw, you needed to add m0re yeast because of the large initial volume. Next time, start a smaller quantity and when it is working well, add the bulk of the juice. Good luck.


Ady 4 years ago

Thanks for the quick response and explanation.

Regarding the juice I'm bit confused abt sugar content; on the label it says carbohydrate 109 g and sugar 120 g....? How come.... after all sugars are essentially carbohydrates!

One more question abt the juice.... having more Vitamin C is better or should be avoided?

I want to achieve more ABV as much as possible are there any tips to the recipe....? I didn't add any sugar yet, just pure juice is going on, is there anything I can add? Nutrients extra sugar etc??


naeemebrahimjee profile image

naeemebrahimjee 4 years ago from London

Hi This is a superb concept. I live in England where I can freely buy cider but i've always wanted to make my own. This is a superb way to "dabble my feet in the water."


Adyy 4 years ago

Hello Paraglider.... I'm "Ady" just joined with user name "Adyy" as Ady is already in use.... never mind.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

naeemebrahimjee, since you're in England, you can probably get wine yeast quite easily. It doesn't change the method but the end result will taste even better. Enjoy :)

Adyy, welcome to HubPages. I'd suggest adding nothing to your first few brews. When you're happy with the process, start experimenting. There are things you can do, but I'd suggest checking out a few of my more advanced hubs. This one is specifically about quick and easy with no special ingredients or techniques.


Adyy 4 years ago

Alright, but remember I don't have access to yeast other than bakers (living in ME) and I think in your other hubs you are using wine or brewers yeast, right?

You didn't tell me abt vitamin C?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

You never add VitC to any wine or cider. But it is OK to use juice that already has VitC added during manufacture. It does no harm.


Adyy 4 years ago

Yeah, I'm not considering to add it, but while choosing the juice from the market shelves which one should be preferred? More vitc or less... But I think I got my answer.... Lesser is better... Right?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

I think it's a pretty minor quality factor compared with the flavour of the juice itself. My favourite juice is Almarai. It always starts quickly, never sticks and gives a nicely balanced dry cider. But much of this comes down to taste.


kay 4 years ago

dumb question but do you need to activate the yeast first?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

No. Dried yeast rehydrates on contact with the juice and very quickly starts to replicate.


RAB.ulster 4 years ago

Can I use this method in a gallon demi john and airlock thank you


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Yes, no problem. But sterilise all the equipment first. Good luck!


billybob 4 years ago

Hi - great article. I made a batch using Almarai apple juice (1.75L bottle), and S23 yeast. I added 2 tablespoons of plain sugar...6 days later its still bubbling merrily. Should I just wait until the bubbling stops before racking off and storing?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Yes. The weather's cooling down now so 6 days is no problem. Just give it a little more time, then refrigerate it.


anettkah 4 years ago

Hi Paraglider, I just tried out this recipe - thanks for posting it! - and my cider was good but very dry. It was only my first attempt but I'm already thinking about improvements. I used a 900ml bottle of 'Innocent' apple juice, which was quite cloudy but sweet, and Tesco's fast action dried yeast (one sachet, 7grams). There was quite a lot of sediment at the bottom. Would you be able to give me more accurate proportions of juice to yeast so that my second attempt is more successful? Thanks!


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

The amount of sediment will always be about the same because the yeast grows by replication until the population is in equilibrium. Next time, ferment it through to near dryness, give it three days in the fridge, decant it all into another flagon, leaving the sediment behind, top it up with a little fresh juice and a teaspoonful of sugar and give it another week in the fridge. It will be slightly sweeter and sparkling after that, but just check the pressure occasionally.


anonmous 4 years ago

hello was wondering how much of this would take to get you drunk . would adding the yesast and leaving for 48 with the lid 3 quarter sealed makes it able to get you drunk . taste doesn't matter i just want alcohol


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

As you sound about 12 years old you'd probably get drunk on half a pint...


anonmous 4 years ago

haha your 3 years off mate , nah its just ive only moved middle east and wanto go drinking soon enough got yeast my preservative free apple juice looks like adding half table spoon and leaving it in the ardrobe for like a day or two then put it into a clean bottle then going drinking


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Half a teaspoon, not half a tablespoon, unless you like the taste of yeast! And two days isn't long enough. It would be too sweet. Give it four.


Maximizer profile image

Maximizer 4 years ago from San Jose, Costa Rica

I used to do this quite a bit with store bought grape juice, and even with baker's yeast it still turned out pretty well. I mean, if you really want to get drunk you could just dump a cup of sugar in a gallon of water and ferment that. Add some kool-aid and you're practically King Richard.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Maximizer - In fact, simple sugar and water doesn't work. Yeast needs nutrients, acidity etc. Without these (provided by the fruit juice) it stops very early.

Anyway, this hub is about making a decent cider, not about getting drunk!


RAB ulster 4 years ago

hi I have done mine in a dj and is still going 10 days later is this still ok..I put two cups sugar in it...should I siphon into a new dj....thank you


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

If you added two cups of sugar I'd expect it to take quite a lot longer. It will be stronger than most ciders when it finishes, maybe around 8%. Let it run its course then refrigerate it to clear it before racking it off into screw-top bottles. Don't rack it into another demijohn. That's a wine procedure, not necessary for cider.


Rab ulster 4 years ago

Thank you ..Your a great help I will let you know the outcome....thanks again


guy 4 years ago

so i have my yeast added to my 2 litres of apple juice how long before it turns to alcohal ?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Depends on temperature and other factors. Typically 4 to 5 days. Then put it in the fridge for a couple of days before drinking it.


guy 4 years ago

is it 100% percent neccesary to put in fridge cause i need alcohol as quick as posssible to sell at partys


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

You need to grow up. Home brewing for your own consumption or to share with friends is one thing. Selling it at parties in the Middle East will get you locked up or deported.


bixby 4 years ago

just tried this and it worked great.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Yes, there's so little can go wrong with this method.


guy 4 years ago

doubt il get caught very easy tbh . sharing it at parties for a price . im making a lot at the moment . think about it everbody wants it but knowbody can get it . its genius . i can sell one of these for 10-20 euro easily


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Yeah, you're right of course. And if you're unlucky enough to get caught and they chop off your hand you can use your euros to buy a prosthetic. Don't risk it. That's my last word on the subject.


guy 4 years ago

well its a lot of money i can sell 20- 100 a night


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Guy - tell me this - do you think nobody in the various Middle East crime prevention services is monitoring the Internet?


TheDoItAllGuy profile image

TheDoItAllGuy 4 years ago

Awesome recipe and tips on how to do it! I will be sure to try this soon since it is fall and I like apple cider! Thanks : )


Rab ulster 4 years ago

Could you explain what back sweetening is please. thank you


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

It is just a name for re-sweetening a wine or cider that has fermented right through to dryness. Personally, I like dry wines and ciders and don't ever sweeten them, but it all comes down to taste. You can use artificial sweeteners like saccharine, unfermentable sugars like lactose, or even fermentable sugar (plain sucrose). But in this case, you have to be sure that all the yeast has cleared out of the wine/cider or else you have to add an artificial preservative or inhibitor to prevent residual yeast restarting a fermentation of the newly added sugar.


salem 4 years ago

hi thank you so much for sharing valuable ways and experiments here

regarding the raisins way for Safgold if am not mistaken

is it possible to use it with the grape wine instead of the hard to find here wine yeast ?!!


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Yes, you can grow a culture of yeast from raisins and use it to make wine or cider. It is not guaranteed to work though as the raisins may have been sterilised before sale. You can use fresh grapes too. The bloom on a grape skin is yeast. But if you use this method try it first on a small quantity as not all wild yeasts are capable of making wine. If you get a good one, keep some of the lees to start a bigger batch. Good luck :)


Jake 4 years ago

Hi, thank you so much for your post. I am wondering what would happen if I use wine yeast instead of normal yeast? It is a 5 gram sachet and says it can work for up to 23 litres. Will this cause problems for me? Also, how would I give this a sparkle? Any recommendations? Thanks again


Jake 4 years ago

Also, while I think of it, is it possible to use another type of juice if it was preservative free? Cranberry? Thanks :)


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Jake - wine yeast will work fine. In fact it will taste better than baking yeast. I use baking yeast in this article because here in the Middle East wine yeast is not available. Just use a half teaspoon per 2 litre flagon.

And yes, you can use different juices but some, e.g. cranberry are better made into wine, blended with grape juice. But by all means experiment.


Jake 4 years ago

Okay, thanks for that. I have started my first batch about three hours ago, however, my yeast was not dissolving at all so I gave it a shake. It has now dissolved. Is that okay? Also, I am concerned about the temperature. The hottest place I can find in the house is only about 20 degrees celcius (68 degrees fahrenheit ). Will this be acceptable? By the way, thank you so much for this article and they way you answer all the questions, you are truly awesome :)


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

20C is a bit on the cold side which is probably why the yeast was slow to start. At that temp it will take up to two weeks to ferment out a cider but the quality won't suffer. Good luck!


Sobakavich 4 years ago

I very much appreciate your blog. I'm also an expat working in the Middle East and would like to have a glass to raise to the sunset on occasion. I can't get the wine yeast locally so far, but will post the results of the cider, many thanks.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Sobakavich - good luck! There's not a lot can go wrong with the cider process.


Jake 4 years ago

Hi paraglider, my first batch is complete! Bottled yesterday, it is so good that I have another 9 litres fermenting right now, and am beginning another 6 litres tomorrow! Thank you so much for the this recipe :)


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Jake - it is good always to start a new batch early, so you always have a stock. Although it is drinkable after a couple of days in the fridge, if you keep it bottled and cold for a month it is much nicer!


Rab ulster 4 years ago

Hi Paraglider My first ever cider came out great a bit strong though.so two more batches on with less sugar I will never be buying shop cider again..a big thank you for your easy to follow steps and your help...ur a gentleman


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Hi Rab - a good apple juice will give a 5 to 6 % cider with no added sugar, which is strong enough for most purposes, especially when you think how little it's costing!


Chris Conn profile image

Chris Conn 4 years ago from Cork

hi Paraglider never tried this method for cider and i have all the equipment and have tried many different types of cider but yet to find my favourite my latest batch is

ingredients

8 litres apple juice

1kg white suger

4 litres of water

3 level teaspoons of dried active yeast

1 litre of red grape juice (for a mixed fruit type of cider)

equipment.

25 litre seal able fermenting bucket with bung and airlock and bottom tap that sits about an inch above sediment so when you pour you just get the juice

its now 3 days old most of the fermenting has slowed down i had a taste and man its coming along well it has a nice fizz to it but still a bit too sweet so another 3-4 days before i start clearing then ill let ya know how it is.

then im tryin out your method so looking forward to that 1 thanks you


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Hi Chris - that sounds OK. When it's almost stopped, I'd run it off into plastic flagons (the kind you get apple juice in) and refrigerate it for a few days, for clarity. If you keep it longer sealed in the fridge the sparkle will also improve.

My method is designed for places where you can't get hold of any wine making equipment, like the Middle East.


Chris Conn profile image

Chris Conn 4 years ago from Cork

i seen that alright i was just letting ya know my lastest batch but even to do it my way you could make your own fermenter with a sealabe bucket and some plastic tubing a glass of water and a strong sticky sealer and a way ya go.

i know your way its 10 times easier at the same tho :)

tell what temperature do you get for the fermentation to be almost done in 3 days before you start clearing it


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

The indoor ambient temperature here tends to be around 28C. In what they call the winter it's a bit less than that and needs about 5 or 6 days to ferment through.


Chris Conn profile image

Chris Conn 4 years ago from Cork

i get ya well we're 18c room temperature so i say to help things run smoothly ill have to light the fire and keep it near there for over a week maybe 2 weeks with a blanket lol

my girlfriend is gone now gettin me the 2 litres of apple juice i have a brown flagon ready and sterilized and im goin tryin out your method and ill let ya know how i get on in the next couple of days.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Fine obliging girlfriend you have there, to be sure ;)


chris conn 4 years ago

ha ha indeed my friend and to let you know its now 2 days and things are working out to what you said. in the after 24 hours pic you have, mine was the same and now the froth is in colony's like 5 towers.

i will say the fire has helped alot. but i cant see bubbles tho so how will i know the majority of the fermentation is done and ready to fridge it


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

I bet you can hear the bubbles if you take the cap off and listen close. Shine a torch through it to see the bubbles. Or taste it with a straw to see if it's dry.


chris conn 4 years ago

fair play mate you have all the answers ill try the torch first cause i like a bit of sparkle in my cider so i better not leave out too much gas :)


chris conn 4 years ago

ok after about 10 attempts at trying to open the bottle cause it was really full of gas and ready to blow froth everywhere i finally got it opened and tasted it through a straw it was was fairly sour am i on the right track do you think


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

You shouldn't have been fermenting in a sealed bottle - that's called a bomb! My method clearly says, after you add the yeast, replace the cap and back it off half a turn to let the gas escape. It stays that way until you screw it down at the end, for refrigeration.


chris conn 4 years ago

i did do a quarter turn backwards after i tightened it maybe i should of done more of a turn ah well i know next time. anyway the question i wanted to know was it's gone to a sour apple taste wit a bit of fizz is this right or is it just based on the type of apple juice i bought


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Different juices give different ciders of course. In apple juice, the malic acid taste is balanced out by the sugar. Ferment out the sugar and you'll be more aware of the acidity (sourness). Give it a few days in the fridge. It does melow, even in that short time. More in a couple of weeks. If you can smell or taste vinegar (acetic acid) something has gone wrong with the fermentation.


chris conn 4 years ago

Once again you have the answers my friend no vinegar smell thank God just the acid taste so a few days it is then and il let ya know


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ajayshah2005 4 years ago from Mid Asia

Good Hub. Thanks and shared with followers.


l-lawrence 4 years ago

Wondering does it change the outcome if you do this in a glass bottle? I plan on making this and your wine recipe for Christmas. If I mess it up I assume I will end up with cooking wine (depending on the degree of suckiness I guess).


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Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

l-lawrence - no problem with a glass bottle, but be sure to sterilise it first. The advantage of using the original container is that it is guaranteed sterile from the start.


grader 4 years ago

thank you Paraglider. i tried your method and it did work well. however, the overall taste was not that good. although it was not taste vinegar, acid flavor was so strong. i pour the whole flagon into an empty one before i kept it in the fridge (to get rid of sediment). also, i pour it again to another one and left it few days at the fridge before drink. however, i found it very hard to drink without mixing it up with a sweet juice because of the acid. i felt it hurt my stomach. i wonder if there is any way to cut or at least reduce the acidity. thanks again


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Hi grader - the fermentation process doesn't create acid (unless it goes very wrong and produces acetic acid but that is bacterial spoilage usually caused by fruit flies getting to the juice). The acid you are tasting is the original malic acid that was in the apple juice from the start. Some juices are more acidic than others so maybe try to find a less sharp juice. Alternatively, you could use a blend of apple and grape juice. It technically wouldn't be cider any more but it would maybe be more to your liking.


Jake 4 years ago

Hi Paraglider! still going strong with your recipe, now made about 35 litres! Needless to say, theres hardly any left. And thats where my problem begins - I have begun making my new batch, but the temperature in the cupboard where I brew was only about 24c or sometimes even 22c. In an effort to raise the temperature I moved the juice up a shelf, and now the temperature on the shelf is 30c. That is my question- how hot is too hot? What temperature will start killing the yeast? Thanks again, and merry christmas!


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 4 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Hi Jake - as a general rule, the quality of the result is better at lower temperatures though it takes longer to complete. 22 to 24 should be no problem. Below 20, things move pretty slowly. 30 is about the upper limit. Above that, you will start killing the yeast. Merry Christmas to you too :)


zipboum 3 years ago

i have tried your method but instead of closing the top and reopening it a bit i have replaced it by a pierced condom. the gaz leaves and i can easily know when the fermation is done.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Yes, that works, but don't use a party balloon as it can drip bad flavours back into the cider.


Guppy 3 years ago

Hi Paraglider, interesting hub! I've already learned so much! I recently bought a bottle for around 20!!! euros... now i am making one myself :)

Should it also work with pommegranate? Or is it better to start up with the first half of apple juice and when it gets going throw in the pommegranate? ive seen that the pommegranate juice has more sugar in it (150g/l) so it can come out a bit stronger?

Thanks.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

It will work with more or less any fruit juice but to keep a cider character, it's best to use at least 50% apple juice in the mix. With this method, mix all the juice first then add the yeast as per instructions above. The extra sugar will result in extra strength.


el turqo 3 years ago

Hello there!

Thanks a lot for giving this simple but practical recipes. The cider is always OK but I still couldn't get a decent wine with your other recipe. Anyway, I'm still trying.

Anyway, the cider recipe (naturally) also works with grapejuice. And now I'm enjoying a 3 day old fizzy grape-ciderish think with a little tequila in it and man...this is awesome.

One question: Here in turkey all the juices I found have about 11g/100ml be it apple or grape or whatever. Is it OK for cider?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

I like the sound of your invention! 11g/100ml is fine. It will come through to about 4%. The juices here in Qatar tend to be around 13g/100ml finishing around the 5% mark. If you wanted, you could add a little more sugar syrup before fermenting, but you'd lose the simplicity of the method.


paul-e-o 3 years ago

Hey Mate!

greetings from New Zealand! Im just posting to say thanks for sharing your interest and knowledge with us all. As I sit here enjoying a glass made to your recipe Im thinking of how I can run with it from here and how simple, wonderful things like this that make the world go round. Cheers!

btw, the cider, mixed with a standard double of a decent gin over ice in a tall glass with a dash of pimms or bitters.............. lovely!


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Thanks Paul. Always good to know the method has legs to travel the World! I like the sound of your mixer too.


jzigbe 3 years ago

Greetings from Kenya. Very nice tutorial.

I will try this but in a fido-type jar [glass jar with wire lock and rubber seal]. I do my water kefir and other ferments in this. It acts like an airlock - it gases off automatically when the pressure exceeds a certain amount.

I just wanted to comment to complete your world map of fans.

Thanks.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Yes, that will work. Kenya, good, we're spreading the word :)


KSAgirl 3 years ago

Thanks so much Paraglider. One of your earlier posters, LeanMan, suggested a way of adding yeast and sugar to non-alcoholic beer to give it alcohol. Would you have any idea of quantities and the time it would take? I want to surprise my husband.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Depends a little on the non-alcoholic beer you use, but if you add sugar at a rate of 100 grams per litre you'll be in the right ball park. Dissolve the sugar before adding the yeast, then proceed exactly as per cider method above. In Saudi, at this time of year, it will take about a week to ferment and a couple of days in the fridge to fall clear. Good luck!


Mrs. Wine Lover 3 years ago

Greetings from Kuwait!

Can I use Instant Yeast (Saf-instant) to make wine?

Also, I bought a glass bottle of Tropicana Apple Juice, how much should I pour out, if any? and how much Instant Yeast should I put in?

Juice in a glass: 1 liter

Instant Yeast Package: 11g

Thanks!

Mrs. Wine Lover


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Saf-instant is the yeast I use when I can't source wine yeast. Look closely at the first photo in the hub- you can read the yeast label!

To prevent it frothing over the top, have a gap of about 2 inches (5 cm) between the juice and the cap.

For a single litre of juice, a quarter teaspoonful of yeast is enough. But the time taken to ferment does not depend on the quantity. One litre takes just as long as two or ten.


hunter 3 years ago

We are making your wine recipe. Does refrigeration start about day 14 from the start or day 24 from the start.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Around 24 (give or take a couple of days, when the bubbling stops). I will clarify that on the hub. Thanks.


Hunter 3 years ago

Great recipe. We're in a Muslim country at the equator 74-88 degrees f . Apple juice, bakers yeast, about 30 hours of fermentation and 24 hours in the fridge yields a carbonated dry but not sour cider. It's good. God bless you. Hunter


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Hunter - it's pretty much foolproof, this method. Glad it's going around the world :)


Mrs. Wine Lover 3 years ago

Good Day,

Its been 8 days since I started my 1st batch of apple cider, the bubbling has stopped. Is it okay to put it in the fridge already? I am in Kuwait and the temp here is about 74-89 degrees. Also, I opened the bottle today and it smells like bread LOL.

Thank you,

Mrs. Wine Lover


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Yes, get it into the fridge. After a couple of days, before drinking it, carefully pour it off its sediment into another flagon. It will improve in the fridge for a few weeks if you don't use it all at once.


Mrs. Wine Lover 3 years ago

So I cant just refrigerate it in the same juice jar?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Yes, you can. But what I'm suggesting will stop it picking up more bread yeast flavour. Either way, it's perfectly wholesome.


Mrs. Wine Lover 3 years ago

Can I put it in a big plastic water bottle?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Yes. Just always make sure that everything is perfectly clean.


Jamesm1968 3 years ago from UK

Superb hub. Will defo be giving this a go. What with cider, wine & spirits in the UK being subject to accumulator tax, this could save a fortune.


sparkleyfinger profile image

sparkleyfinger 3 years ago from Glasgow

I am Deffos doing this!! I like a sweeter cider, will adding sugar at the start or end make it sweeter?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

James - since you're in the UK, getting hold of dried wine yeast should be no problem. It does give better results than baking yeast, though either will work.

Sparkleyfinger - let it ferment right through to the end, refrigerate it to clear it, pour it off the sediment into a new flagon and top this up with more apple juice with some sugar dissolved in it. Keep it in the fridge and occasionally release the cap to let the gas out if necessary.


sparkleyfinger profile image

sparkleyfinger 3 years ago from Glasgow

Thanks!


pxl 3 years ago

Hey! Thanks for all this information! I startet a batch yesterday and I am very curious, how it will turn out.

Is there any particulair reason against using fresh yeast in "cake" form? I did that because I didn't have any dry yeast at home yesterday.

By the way, your recipe now has spread to germany too ;) While we have some sort of Cider, called Apfelwein, it is extremely dry, sour and flat. The apples used are of a specially sour brand. People would often mix it with lemonade or soda because of that. It isn't a bad thing but I really like the slightly sweeter and sparkling nature of UK-Ciders, which are very expensive to buy over here.

My father had lots of brewing utensils, but he sold them when we moved away from the countrieside. He used to try spontaneous fermentation but that didn't work out a lot of the time. Maybe I can surprise him.


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

pxl - fresh yeast is also perfectly OK to use. Again, wine yeast gives a better end result than bread yeast, but both will work. Most supermarket apple juices are made from dessert apples that are not highly acidic, so even if you ferment right through to total dryness it will still not be as sour as your Apfelwein.


Pumpkins 3 years ago

I like flat beer.


Sa'adFD 3 years ago

Would this work with the type of carbonated non-alcoholic cider they sell in Saudi?


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Sa'adFD - probably not. These processed drinks are usually full of preservatives and contain very little natural nutrients for the yeast. Fresh apple juice is easily available in Saudi so it's best to use that, as per my method.


Philemon 3 years ago

Hi Paraglider, tried this method last year here in the ME with some apple juice and bread yeast, but couldn't get past the yeasty taste. Was fortunate enough to have a trip home since then and brought back some brewer's and wine yeast.

Started 1.75 l of Tropicana Apple Juice 1 week ago with some brewer's yeast. Bubbling has almost ceased and the flavor is much better than the previous attempts. According to specific gravity calc's it is around 5.7% ABV and is dry and flat.

I don't mind the dryness, but would actually like a bit of sparkle. From what I've gleaned from the comments section here, I should let it settle for a few days in the fridge and then decant it into another container at which time I should add some additional juice and sugar if I want a but of fizz. Just how much sugar are we talking about?

Also ... will the carbonation still build up if I continue to leave it in the fridge? That seemed counter-intuitive to me, but seems to be what is being suggested.

Thanks so much for your advice!


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Hi Philemon. The taste is certainly better if you use a brewing yeast. Bread yeast always gives a sharpness to the flavour, but for many people it's the only yeast available.

Yes, if you've fermented it right through to dryness and want to introduce a sparkle, decant it into a fresh flagon, allowing a little of the cloudy lees to pass into the new flagon (but only a little!) Top it up with fresh juice. Extra sugar is not necessary but if you do add some, no more than a level teaspoonful. Leave it out of the fridge for a couple of days with the cap tight. It should start to referment slowly. You won't see bubbles but the bottle will start to pressurise slightly. Then store it in the fridge until use.


Philemon 3 years ago

Great - thanks for the prompt advice! I will let you know how it goes.


Yorkshire Bird 3 years ago

I am making the cider and started as you suggested but using wine yeast then added juice to fill a 1 gallon container. It is now day 10 and the stuff is still bubbling away merrily, the temperature of the room is good, do I just let it continue until it almost stops bubbling? Maybe it will be more of an apple wine! Many Thanks.


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Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Yes, just let it slow right down naturally. It will turn out around the 5% mark for a typical apple juice.


Yorkshire Bird 3 years ago

Thanks for that will let it run its course.


Philemon 3 years ago

Hey Paraglider, the brewer's yeast made a very drinkable brew. I added a teaspon of sugar and let it work on that a few days to add some sparkle, but it didn't really do much. I took it out of the fridge as I thought that perhaps the temperature was impeding the process. A few days back at room temp added some more fizz, but still not as much as I would like. Am starting the next batch today. If I want a more sparkling batch (but still fairly dry), should I add more sugar to begin with? Or stop the fermentation earlier? Or let the secondary fermentation go longer? Any advice would be greatly appreciated - you're a champ!


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Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Best way is to watch for the near end of fermentation and screw the cap down about 8 to 12 hours before you put it in the fridge, to build up some pressure - but Not Too Much!! But you have to be a bit careful. Experience. . .


Turkeybird 3 years ago

Hi Paraglider,

Love your Hub and as a cider drinker I'm looking forward to trying yours as its too expensive here. I'm in Turkey and have some 100% apple juice which has no added sugar, should I add sugar?


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Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Turkeybird - most apple juice has enough natural sugar to make a good strength cider, around 5 to 5.5% alcohol. No need to add more.


Turkeybird 3 years ago

Thank you Paraglider, I have poured the apple juice from its carton into a new 1.5 litre water bottle, will it matter that there is so much air space?


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Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

It won't matter while it is fermenting, but when it is finished and you have cleared it in the fridge, pour it off into a smaller bottle (unless you are going to use it right away)


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artdivision 3 years ago from London

Apple juice is my fave!


paul-e-o 3 years ago

hey para

greetings once again from NZ

ive been thinking, and ive come up with this.....

i drain off slightly more apple juice at the beginning, i then blend up a can of peaches (in syrup) a fair handful of raisins and some cinnamon (and/or nutmeg), pitch the mixture in and add yeast as usual and leave it to its devices. aside from a slightly longer fermentation time due the increased initial sugar level and the use of wine yeast instead of bread yeast, the process is exactly the same and yields a delicious cider with excellent mouth feel and finish. ive started experimenting with fermentation times in an attempt to alter sweetness and carbonation levels, which is probably easier for me to do due to the climate here, ive found that decanting and refrigeration a day or two earlier than normal has given the required levels of both. the taste reminds me of winter style hot toddy or mulled wine of sorts, with a ski season coming up im very much looking forward to this! however with the omission of the raisins and spices it could lend itself very nicely to long hot summers outside!!

food for thought.


John 3 years ago

won't it be necessary to pasteurise again to kill the yeast before consuming?


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Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Paul-e-o, Experimenting is good. Personally, I don't much like spices in wines and ciders, or at least, I'd rather add them later if I had the notion no make a mulled wine. But the main thing is to make what you enjoy drinking, which you seem to be doing! (I didn't see your post till today. HP had marked it as spam).


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Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

John - no need to do that. When it clears in the fridge nearly all the yeast settles out. Only very small amounts remain suspended in the cider. Besides, live yeast is absolutely harmless.


Turkeybird 3 years ago

Hi Paraglider,

I'm happy with the cider I have been making, thank you, I have been spreading the word!

One of my friends tells me she cant drink cider, she likes white wine but we can only get rather expensive organic white grape juice and she cant drink red wine, so she tells me she has just bottled apple wine from your hub instructions. My question is " what is the difference between apple cider and apple wine?"


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Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Turkeybird - Cider is fermented apple juice, pure and simple. It naturally turns out around the 5% ABV mark, has a sparkle, and is drunk in large glasses as a thirst quencher, like beer. Apple wine has added sugar and sometimes acid before fermentation and is designed to turn out around the 12% mark. Fermentation takes longer and some maturing time is also needed. The wine is drunk in smaller glasses and should be perfectly clear and not sparkling.


Wise one 3 years ago

Hey mate, as an Aussie living in the ME you have saved my life.


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Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

That's good - and no charge ;)


Rokan-r 3 years ago

I hope you know how incredible this info you have given us is!

I am living in the Middle East and have no access to drinks. If this works for me it will be a life changer.

Your efforts are greatly appreciated.

I have started a couple of flagons. One Nadec and the other a Nada apple. The Nada one states a sugar level of 13g. I imagine that one would yield a higher alcohol content.

If I do want to rack the cider into another flagon/container should I use a tube? Should I sanitize the tube? I ask this because would just pouring the juice cause a fair amount of yeast to transfer to the new flagon?

Again many thanks for your hub.


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Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

The Nada apple could in theory come out at almost 7%. To find out why, read this: https://delishably.com/beverages/How-Strong-is-my-... but I'd expect it to finish around 6.5 with some residual sweetness and a sparkle. After two or three days in the fridge, it will pour clear of the sediment. If a little comes over it doesn't matter. Siphoning is just as likely to suck up some sediment. Not worth the trouble! Just pour carefully! By the way, if you can get hold of some wine yeast, the quality is better, of course.


Rokan-r 3 years ago

Hi Paraglider,

Thank you for the quick reply. I am done with one flagon, the Nadec one, and it has turned out as you said. It is a hard dry cider, and it is decent. I say decent because I am not a cider drinker so I cant compare. In fact I could be mistaken for considering it decent. This might be a silly question but how do I know that my cider has not turned to vinegar or was in the process of turning into vinegar?

It does not have a vinegary smell per say, but it does have sharp nose and taste. Keep in mind that I stopped fermenting after three day and placed it in the fridge. I did this to keep some carbonation in it.

I went to the supermarket again and scanned the fridges for juices that I can ferment. I am afraid of turning to a fermented juice addict! I remember reading on your hub someone fermenting a mixed berries juice. I picked up a Nadec mix berries juice and it states a sugar level of 20 grams. According to the strength control page you gave me, thanks for that by the way, I theoretically should expect an alcohol level above the 11%!! How realistic is that? I know you have mentioned earlier that baker’s yeast would not be good enough to produce such levels. What should I expect?

I was thinking, once both type of juices have stopped fermenting I cold mix them together. What that be wise or would I unknowingly be drinking poison?

For increasing the strength of alcohol you mentioned adding 100 grams of sugar per liter (6.5 tablespoons, right?). Any particular type of sugar or just regular sugar would do?


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Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

It won't turn to vinegar unless you let fruit flies get to it, very unlikely in the Middle East. The sharpish taste and smell comes from the bread yeast. If you get hold of wine yeast it will be smoother.

Are you sure the mixed berries juice doesn't contain preservatives? Read the small print. If it does, it won't work. If it doesn't, it could ferment right through to 11%, but not in 3 days. It would take a couple of weeks min.


Rokan-r 3 years ago

It states various levels of Potassium (not sorbate), Magnesium, Fiber, and Iron. The word preservative is not stated.

I guess the Potassium has to be a preservative huh?

I have put the yeast in and it has frothed at the top just like the apple juice. No bubbles though. Should I wait and see what happens.


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Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Not necessarily. You might be OK. Only time will tell :)


Rokan-r 3 years ago

Oh dang!! I just read that Citric acid e330 is in there. That is a preservative right?

The first flagon is all done. That was great.

Thanks again and Cheers.


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Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Citric acid is not a preservative. It's the fruit acid found in lemons and oranges. Shouldn't be a problem.


smorrebrod 3 years ago

Thanks for this great article! Is there any way to reduce the bready odour from the use of baker's yeast?


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Paraglider 3 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

The best way is, after clearing it in the fridge, pour it off the sediment into another clean flagon and keep it in the fridge for about two weeks before drinking. It's not as good as with wine yeast but the extra time does soften the yeastiness.


Faisal M 3 years ago

nice idea for sterilisation, which as far as I know is important in making cider or beer to prevent infection.

Also it is Middle East supermarket supplies, as we say in here (stretch your legs to the length of your blanket).


Anthony 2 years ago

Finally, a clear, realistic recipe, using the exact same ingredients that are available in Saudi Arabia! Thans a lot, bro, made my day.


SP 2 years ago

Hey bro I m using an expired apple juice bottle and that even 18 month expired .... would that be OK .......because the seal of the bottle is still intact ... any comment


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Paraglider 2 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

SP - probably perfectly ok if the seal is intact and if it smells good when first opened. If in doubt, don't use it though. No-one can guarantee it is still ok.


James in Swansea, South Wales 2 years ago

Found this on my way to work. stopped off for some Innocent Apple Juice, will update in a week to 10 days, when out of the fridge. Thanks for the info.


Shirin 2 years ago

Hi very helpful! But how many litres is a large flagon of apple juice ? :)

Thanx


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Paraglider 2 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

2 litres is the largest standard size, but it doesn't matter - it takes the same length of time to ferment 10 litres as 2!


suitsyou 2 years ago

To avoid the sediment all together could you decant into another vessel through a fine filter once it's ready to go?


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Paraglider 2 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Yes you can, but filtering always reduces quality (loss of flavour, risk of oxidation, etc). I prefer to pour it off the sediment into a fresh vessel. Commercial wine/cider makers do filter, but using pressure difference techniques in a sterile oxygen-free environment (pure nitrogen, usually). You can't do this at home!


suitsyou 2 years ago

Thanks for the advice. I've used active dry yeast by mistake but it seems ok just takes a bit longer I think.


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Paraglider 2 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Dried yeast is fine. It rehydrates immediately you add it to the juice.


sha 2 years ago

Hi very helpful !! So my question is after fermentation should i keep the bottle in to straight fridge or pour ino another bottle and keep in fridge :-)


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Paraglider 2 years ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

It's better to transfer it to another bottle, leaving the sediment behind. It keeps longer if you do that and is easier to pour cleanly.


dillwill 21 months ago

Hi hope yu doing good . ok I add 1 cup of sugar on the same bottle dissolve it and add 1 spoon of yeast after 6 hr it ferment like crazy, after 11 days I decant it to another bottle using modify hose stick then put it in freezer for 4hr bcoz no access to refrigerator .. then I start drinking I can feell little buzz but cant get high.. should I use airlock


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Paraglider 21 months ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Sugar on its own doesn't ferment well. Yeast needs nutrients and acid. Better to use fruit juice and a proper method.


Strongbow 20 months ago

Successful!!!!!!!

Today is 4th day and it's already taste like Magners. I used

1. MASAFI apple juice 2 ltr (very sweet)

2. 6 tbsp Sugar (melted in microwave with 3 tbsp Water)

3. 1/2 teaspoon Haiko yeast (Very slow reacting baker's yeast)

From the taste I can tell, there is more than 6% alcohol in there.

I don't know how to thank you Paraglider. In my country cider beer is not available anywhere. Strongbow is my favorite.


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Paraglider 19 months ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

I've used Masafi in the past. It is one of the better supermarket juices. Glad it's working out!


Caroline Cairo 16 months ago

Hi Dave, Yesterday I started 2 one liter masafi bottles and I guess I didn't leave enough room at the top of one and it has bubbled over - now with some dry foam stuck to lid and outside of bottle - can I clean the lid with boiling water and replace of start again?


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Paraglider 16 months ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Hi Caroline - yes, just wipe everything clean with paper kitchen towel and a little boiled water. It will settle down in a day or so and will be fine.


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Vegas Elias 16 months ago from Mumbai

Useful info.


Jamie 15 months ago

Hi Dave

I'm also in kingdom, I brought some cider yeast out with me to make a batch, can I reuse the yeast dregs left after brewing by adding fresh apple juice and a bit of sugar?


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Paraglider 14 months ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Jamie, yes, and you don't need to use much of the dregs. Start with a new vessel and add some of the dregs to the fresh juice, not the other way round.


Dan1825 14 months ago

I have a question. I made my cider it has a really sour tast is that normal plus do I have to put it in a fridge


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Paraglider 14 months ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Dan - the sour taste was always there in the apple juice. It is the fruit acid, mostly malic acid. Before fermentation, it is masked by the sugar in the juice. After fermentation, the sugar is all converted to alcohol. Cider is always going to be sourer than beer, for example. But it will mellow if you keep it for a month or so. You don't have to keep it in the fridge, but most people prefer to serve cider cold.


Dan1825 14 months ago

Thx paraglider I will keep it for a month, also if I add sugar to it, would it affect the cider


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Paraglider 14 months ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

If you add sugar before it is completely stable, it will start fermenting slowly again and probably not fall clear. Not usually a good idea.


Douglas 14 months ago

Hi,

Following your advice I decided to try this cider method, although I improvised by using 5 1 litre cartons with a 5 litre bottle. However, I found that it was "pure apple juice from concentrate". Now, it didn't say anything about preservatives, but is that okay?

Regards


Douglas 14 months ago

Hi Paraglider,

I've just had a little taste of my cider and it's perfect!

I was just wondering about the risk of blindness? I've been really careful to sterilize everything that I've used, but I've heard rumours of the potential production of methanol? and I was just wondering if you could put my mind at the rest as I have a party on saturday that I'm intending to drink it at.

also, I've brewed 15 litres and the 5litre bottles will definitely not fit in my fridge, so I was wondering if I packed a bin bag filled box with ice and line it with polystyrene and left it out in my hut if it would do the same job?

and lastly, how do I guarantee the cloudyness will subside? because I'd much rather have it clear.

a fast reply would be really appreciated

thanks so much for the recipe!


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 14 months ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Douglas - there is no risk of blindness from fermenting fruit juice. There is a risk from distilling spirits without due care and attention, but that is a completely different activity.

Your cider will fall clear in time, whether you chill it or not, but it clears faster in the cold. your proposed method should work fine.


Douglas 14 months ago

Thanks for your help!

I found that it didn't separate from the sediment very well and even after a day in a binbag filled with ice and another day and half in my sink filled with ice, it still had some levels of sediment appearing at the bottom of the new bottles.

I tried filtering it with coffee filters, but that only really half worked. are there any tricks to quicken the process, other than what I've already done?


Eric 12 months ago

Great article! I just started it yesterday but was wondering how tight the cap should be. I did just under a half turn because a quarter seemed too tight but I check up on it every few hours and the plastic bottle really expands and I'm scared it's gonna blow! I just loosen the cap until I hear the pressure release and then leave it where it is, maybe tighten it just a smidge. Is that normal or is my cap too tight? Thanks!


Eric 12 months ago

Hello again. Just for future reference, after I try this a few times I'd like to try and increase the alcohol content. I read your article about controlling the strength and that chart comparing sugar content to alcohol content was very useful. But if I want to add sugar straight to the apple juice, do I add it first and shake it up before adding yeast? Or would I add the sugar after it's fermented for a few days? Also, would brown sugar be ok? I read somewhere that it could give a nice, different flavour. Thank you again! I'm so excited to try this!


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Paraglider 12 months ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

I prefer to start the yeast in pure juice. If you are going to add extra sugar, dissolve it in boiled water first and leave it to cool to room temperature. Brown sugar or honey are OK but certainly alter the taste. Some people like it.


Eric 12 months ago

So it's been four days now and I just tried it for the first time and it has very little taste. It doesn't taste sour or like vinegar it's kinda like carbonated water. Any explanation for this? Can I just add sugar to make it palatable?


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Paraglider 12 months ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

How much taste it has depends on the quality of the juice you used. But after only 4 days, it won't have finished fermenting. give it a bit longer.


Dougie 6 months ago

Hi,

I used cloudy fresh pressed apples and I was wondering if it was possible for it to turn clear after fermentation?


Dougie 6 months ago

also, I used wine yeast, but the fermentation isn't as explosive as it was when I used the baker's yeast; so I was wondering if it'll take longer?


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Paraglider 6 months ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Hi Dougie - It can still fall clear and probably will, after about two days in the fridge. Wine yeast is always a slower starter than baking yeast but it more than holds its own in the main fermentation stage. Total time should be about the same.


Dougie 6 months ago

Thanks so much!


Gilliatt 6 months ago

Hi Paraglider, thanks for the recipe! Wondering if I put it in the fridge for 2 days and then put it into another sterile container and sealed it, would it last a couple of days without being refrigerated as I would love to take it camping with me. Cheers!


Joseph 6 months ago

Hey mate, can u store the cider in a second bottle outside the fridge or no. Ty


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Paraglider 6 months ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Gilliatt and Ty - After a couple of days in the fridge you can transfer it to another bottle. It will keep fresh and improve out of the fridge for several weeks, as long as you have worked cleanly.


cider Bhoy 5 months ago

Hi Paraglider,

Thanks for the recipe.Once the fermentation process is underway can i add juice with preservatives as preservative free juice is really expensive in Indonesia?

thanks for your reply


iggyboy60 5 months ago

This works and works well. Got a bit silly, did 5ltrs of AJ with 5grms of wine yeast and 1kg of sugar. Got a 14% alcoholic blast and it tastes awesome. Took a total of six weeks to ferment and then clear. Well worth the extra wait for a top result. I'm hooked.


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Paraglider 5 months ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

cider Bhoy - you might get away with it but probably not. It is likely that the preservatives would stop the fermentation.

iggyboy - if you are going for wine strength, you'll get a more balanced result if you go 50:50 apple and grape juice.


Tobias 3 months ago

In other booze making tutorials they use an airlock. Is this just as safe without one?


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Paraglider 3 months ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Tobias - yes. This method uses sterile pasteurised juice in a new container, opened once only to add the yeast, after which there is positive pressure from inside, forcing CO2 out through the loosely fastened screw cap. Nothing is going to get in to mess it up.


derekthomson 8 weeks ago

Tried this, it worked perfectly, thanks.

Just 2 questions:

I would like to brew about 25 liters using a home brew fermenting bin and store in a pressure keg, is there any difference in procedure.

Although first attempt very good, I found this slightly bland, is there a way of giving it a little more character, I've read somewhere that tea can be added. Is this a good idea, anything else that I could add/do to improve finished product .


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Paraglider 7 weeks ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Derek -Basically same procedure, but start the fermentation in about one litre, then when it is going very well, pour it into the big vessel and add the rest of the juice over the course of a week, then let it ferment out, or nearly.

Tea adds tannin which gives some astringency. You can also experiment with some lemon or grapefruit juice for acidity. Another good one is a little cranberry juice, not too much. It adds to the flavour and if you get it right it can look like Magners, slightly rose coloured.


Chris Conway 6 weeks ago

Hi Paraglider,

Great to see you've attentively addressed this article for years! Just trying my first batch in New Zealand. It may prove tough here since we rarely get over 20-Celsius, but I figure no harm in letting it sit for 4-6 days before refrigerating.

I leave my lid screwed on very loosely; is the lid purely to enforce sterilisation, or is there a need to have it somewhat restrictive?

Thanks,

Chris


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Paraglider 6 weeks ago from Kyle, Scotland Author

Hi Chris - it should still be OK in cool temperatures but will take longer to ferment, maybe up to two weeks. On the plus side, the longer slower fermentation often results in higher quality. The loose lid lets the carbon dioxide gas out so the bottle doesn't explode! But it also makes it impossible for airborne bacteria or wild yeasts (or fruit flies!) to gain access against the stream of CO2 escaping via the screw-cap's thread.

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