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How to Make Meetha Daliya (Sweet Wheat Porridge)

Rajan writes to share his knowledge of health, yoga, pranayama, alternative therapies, natural remedies, food recipes, and more.

Meetha Daliya (Sweet Wheat Porridge)

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In Hindi, meetha means sweet, and daliya means porridge. This is a recipe for a sweet porridge prepared with cracked or broken wheat. Daliya can also be spelled as dalia.

Daliya can be prepared with any broken or crushed grain. Typically, it is prepared with wheat, but other grains can be used, too, including rice, oats, or barley. It is a wholesome dish that can be prepared in minutes.

In this recipe, we are using fresh milk, some aromatic spices, and nuts for added nutrition.

Daliya is a common breakfast food in North India. It is especially popular in the winter season, as it is consumed hot. Usually, this porridge can replace the typical Indian bread, called roti or paratha. Daliya is quite filling all on its own, but you can also have roti or paratha with it, if you wish. I skip the milk at breakfast and have daliya instead, along with bread.

Cook Time

Prep timeCook timeReady inYields

5 min

25 min

30 min

serves 4

Ingredients

  • 500 ml full fat milk, raw
  • 1 cup daliya/broken/cracked wheat
  • 150 grams sugar
  • 1/2 tsp cardamom powder
  • 10 pistachios, sliced, for garnishing
  • 10 almonds, skinned and sliced
  • 10 cashews, sliced
  • 10 raisins
  • 15-20 strands kesar/saffron
  • 650 ml water

Instructions

  1. Dry roast the daliya for 5 minutes on low to medium low heat, stirring constantly till leaves its aroma.
  2. In a pressure cooker, put the daliya and water and on medium heat cook till 2 whistles. Take off heat and let the pressure subside.
  3. Keep the milk to boil on low heat while the pressure in the cooker subsides. Check the daliya once the pressure eases. It should be cooked soft.
  4. Once the milk comes to a boil, keep the heat on medium and add the saffron, cardamom powder, sliced almonds & cashews, sugar, and raisins. Save some sliced cashews & almonds for garnishing. Stir till the sugar dissolves.
  5. Reduce heat to low. Add the daliya and keep stirring simultaneously to prevent lumps from forming.
  6. Cook for 2-3 minutes till the daliya combines with the milk and becomes thicker. Stir occasionally.
  7. Transfer to a bowl and garnish with the sliced pistachios, the saved sliced almonds and cashews, and a little cardamom powder.

Video: How to Make Meetha Daliya

© 2018 Rajan Singh Jolly

Comments

Rajan Singh Jolly (author) from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar, INDIA. on September 24, 2018:

That is good manatita. Thank you.

manatita44 from london on September 22, 2018:

I think I have had this one in Southall. It's quite nice. Not been so often since I moved, but they do it or something like it at some Sikh ceremonies, not so far from me. Delicious.

Rajan Singh Jolly (author) from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar, INDIA. on September 21, 2018:

It is a healthy dish no doubt. Saffron is expensive everywhere but it really makes the dish taste several notches higher besides being a very healthy addition.

I had no idea of what a tabouli was and I did look it up and if I got it right it is a salad made veggies and cracked wheat. I need to try it.

Peggy Woods from Houston, Texas on September 21, 2018:

This sounds very nourishing with the nuts added. Saffron must be less expensive where you live. Adding 15 to 20 strands of saffron would be really expensive where we live and shop for it.

The way I usually use bulgur wheat (cracked wheat) is by making tabouli.

Rajan Singh Jolly (author) from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar, INDIA. on August 13, 2018:

Yes, it sure is, manatita and not too sweet, just the way you'd like. Have a great day!

Rajan Singh Jolly (author) from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar, INDIA. on August 13, 2018:

Thank you, Bill.

manatita44 from london on August 12, 2018:

Short and sweet … and tempting!! Ha ha. Have a great weekend.

Bill Holland from Olympia, WA on August 12, 2018:

I always learn new things from your food articles, and this was no exception.