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How to Cook Eggvocado (Eggs Baked Inside Avocados)

Kylyssa Shay is a science-loving foodie who enjoys creating and perfecting delicious recipes, often on the cheap.

Avocado with cooked egg inside it. Moments later, this clever brunch tidbit was being stabbed with whole-grain toast.

Avocado with cooked egg inside it. Moments later, this clever brunch tidbit was being stabbed with whole-grain toast.

Try My Eggvocado Recipe and Technique

Do you love avocados? Do you love eggs? Then you simply must try an eggvocado!

An eggvocado is an egg cooked in a slightly hollowed-out avocado half. It combines the smooth texture of egg yolk with the creamy texture of warm avocado, and you can cook the yolks to your preferred firmness. A light fragrance of avocado flavors the egg white in a subtly savory, earthy way, and a touch of salt brings an intensity to all of the combined flavors that I find simply delicious.

Funny how eggs and avocados have similar shapes, isn't it?

Funny how eggs and avocados have similar shapes, isn't it?

How to Make Baked Avocado Eggs

Ingredients:

  • 2 small or medium eggs
  • 1 medium or large, ripe avocado
  • Salt to taste
  • Water for the water bath

Equipment:

  • 1 covered baking dish
  • 1 knife
  • 1 spoon

Method:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350˚F. Choose a large, perfectly ripe avocado. Choose two small eggs.
  2. Cut the avocado it in half, lengthwise and remove the seed. Use a spoon to scoop out a bit of flesh from each side to make the natural bowl made by the pit larger. Each half needs to accommodate the volume of an entire egg. Feel free to overestimate how much room it will take because you can always add a little of the removed flesh back to it after you add the egg if you hollow it out too much.
  3. Lightly salt the avocado halves and place them in a small baking dish that has a lid. Add about half an inch of water to the baking dish. Crack an egg into the hollow in each half. Cover the baking dish with its lid and put it on the middle rack in a 350˚F oven.
  4. For a texture approaching a soft-boiled egg, leave it in the oven for about 18 to 22 minutes. Leave it in the oven for about 22 to 26 minutes for a firm yolk. Cooking time may vary depending on your oven and baking dish. I recommend checking the egg centers at about 16 minutes for soft-centered eggs and at about 20 minutes for firm-centered eggs. Do not overcook, as the white of the egg will become rubbery all throughout and the avocado will get mushy.

Serves 2 people. Approximately 200 calories per serving. (Calories calculated using data found at Avocado Nutrition Facts and Calorie King.)

Scoop some flesh from both halves, and put in a baking dish.

Scoop some flesh from both halves, and put in a baking dish.

Pour eggs into avocado halves in water bath.

Pour eggs into avocado halves in water bath.

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Read More From Delishably

Bake the Eggvocados in a Water Bath

A covered baking dish is the key to maintaining humidity to keep the egg whites tender while allowing them to steam-cook to doneness without over-cooking the yolks or rendering the avocado mushy.

Even plated simply, this eggvocado did not last long.

Even plated simply, this eggvocado did not last long.

How Did I Learn About the Joys of Eggvocado?

My roommate sends me recipes quite frequently in the hopes that I might prepare them, and this was one that I had to try right away. It turned out delicious, but the texture didn't come out exactly as I would have liked. The egg white was rubbery on the surface by the time it cooked enough to not be liquid and nasty right around the yolk and leathery by the time the yolk was cooked.

So I experimented with the recipes I found online and tweaked them in a variety of ways to get the results I wanted. The key to reaching the exact texture and flavors I desired was a combination of the right temperature, the right humidity, and the correct cooking time. The rest of the dish is simplicity itself—an egg cooked in a somewhat hollowed out avocado half with a bit of salt.

Delicious Modifications and Ideas for Serving

Make it to your taste!

They are delicious in their basic form, but they are also marvelous with additions and other modifications. I love to stab mine with crispy bacon and top it with a few grinds of black pepper. Other times I like a little salsa served on top of it or on the side to blend in bite by bite. My roommate loves hers with Louisiana hot sauce.

They also taste good with a dab of sour cream or a generous dollop of plain nonfat Greek yogurt on top. A pat of butter or a spritz of "I Can't Believe You Thought It was Butter" spray jacks up the flavor as well. I plan on trying my favorite avocado dish with a sprinkling of chives or green onions next.

I like a piece of whole wheat or heavy sunflower bread spread with the extra avocado flesh spread on it to dip into the yolks when I cook them to an "over medium" level of doneness and they are a nice deep orange and syrupy.

What Can I Do With the Extra Avocado Flesh?

I usually just set aside the extra flesh and plop it on top of the cooked eggvocado or spread it on whole-wheat toast and serve it with the dish. Otherwise, I simply eat it.

Avocado is also delicious mixed in with brown rice and a bit of low sodium soy sauce so it could be used that way.

If you wish to save the small bit of flesh scooped from the halves for later use, store it in an airtight container that it completely fills or add a dab of something acidic such as lemon or lime juice to keep it from going brown. Refrigerate it until you are ready to use it.

© 2013 Kylyssa Shay

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