Pumpkin Pie From Real Pumpkins

Updated on September 13, 2019
PegCole17 profile image

Peg Cole is a self-taught cook who shares favorite recipes and methods of cooking and baking.

More than just a decoration, these gourds make delicious baked goods.
More than just a decoration, these gourds make delicious baked goods. | Source

It's Time for Fall Baking

Fall is on the way, soon to turn those hot summer days into cool weather that's perfect for baking. How about baking those pumpkins wasting away on your porch as the temperatures drop? Your kids will enjoy helping you turn these natural decorations into a delicious pie.

How to Pick the Right Pumpkin for Baking

For the tastiest pies, select a medium-sized sweet and adorable pumpkin. It's better not to use the really huge jack-o'-lanterns. A four-pound pumpkin is the perfect size for making about 1 1/2 cups of cooked pulp.

Let's learn how to cut them, cook them and turn them into a pie.

Choose Your Technique: Baking or Boiling

For baking: If you prefer to bake the pumpkin, you're good to go after cutting the pumpkin in half (or quarters) and removing the seeds and pulp. After it's baked, the cooked pulp will be spooned from the skin.

For boiling: If you like the on-the-stove method, continue cutting the quarters into 1-inch cubes.

Photo Guide: How to Cut a Pumpkin

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Remove the stem and cut the gourd in half, lengthwise using a sharp knife.Cut in half with seeds and pulp inside.Pumpkin in half with pulp removed.Cut the halves into quarters to bake.Soak the seeds in water to remove the remaining pulp.This may take a couple of rinses.Use a strainer to drain the seeds and spread them out on paper towels.Pumpkin seeds can be baked for snacks or used in the garden when dried.
Remove the stem and cut the gourd in half, lengthwise using a sharp knife.
Remove the stem and cut the gourd in half, lengthwise using a sharp knife. | Source
Cut in half with seeds and pulp inside.
Cut in half with seeds and pulp inside. | Source
Pumpkin in half with pulp removed.
Pumpkin in half with pulp removed. | Source
Cut the halves into quarters to bake.
Cut the halves into quarters to bake. | Source
Soak the seeds in water to remove the remaining pulp.
Soak the seeds in water to remove the remaining pulp.
This may take a couple of rinses.
This may take a couple of rinses. | Source
Use a strainer to drain the seeds and spread them out on paper towels.
Use a strainer to drain the seeds and spread them out on paper towels. | Source
Pumpkin seeds can be baked for snacks or used in the garden when dried.
Pumpkin seeds can be baked for snacks or used in the garden when dried.

Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

Toss the clean, dried seeds in melted butter and salt. Spread in a single layer on a cookie sheet and roast for about 45 minutes to an hour. Delicious as a healthy snack.

How to Boil a Pumpkin

  1. Begin by washing the outside skin to remove dirt, debris and contaminants.
  2. Using a sharp knife, cut around the stem and remove it.
  3. Now, cut the pumpkin in half from the stem to the base.
  4. Use a spoon or other utensil to scrape out the seeds and pulp.
  5. Separate the seeds and soak them in water to remove the pulp.
  6. Use a strainer to drain the seeds and spread them out on paper towels to dry.
  7. Save the stringy pulp for the compost bin.
  8. Cut the halved pumpkin into quarters, and then into smaller sections.
  9. Turn each slice on its side to cut into smaller pieces.
  10. Slice off the peeling and the remaining pulp from each piece.
  11. Place the cubed fruit into a large stew pot with a lid.
  12. Cover the cubes with water and bring to a boil over medium heat.
  13. Cover the pot and cook the cubes on medium heat for 35 to 40 minutes until tender when pierced with a fork.

Photo Guide for Boiling

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Continue to slice the quartered pumpkin into smaller sections.Turn each slice on its side to cut into smaller pieces.Use a knife to slice off the pulp and the skin from each piece.Place the cubes into a deep stew pot.Continue cubing the pumpkin.Continue to cut the remaining slices into cubes.Cover the cubes with water and bring to a boil.
Continue to slice the quartered pumpkin into smaller sections.
Continue to slice the quartered pumpkin into smaller sections. | Source
Turn each slice on its side to cut into smaller pieces.
Turn each slice on its side to cut into smaller pieces. | Source
Use a knife to slice off the pulp and the skin from each piece.
Use a knife to slice off the pulp and the skin from each piece. | Source
Place the cubes into a deep stew pot.
Place the cubes into a deep stew pot. | Source
Continue cubing the pumpkin.
Continue cubing the pumpkin. | Source
Continue to cut the remaining slices into cubes.
Continue to cut the remaining slices into cubes. | Source
Cover the cubes with water and bring to a boil.
Cover the cubes with water and bring to a boil. | Source
Source
Source

How to Bake a Pumpkin

If you've chosen a large pumpkin like this one, you may need to use more than one method to cook it all.

  1. A turkey roasting pan works nicely to bake the quartered gourd.
  2. Add a little water to the bottom of the pan.
  3. Cover with a lid or foil.
  4. Bake at 375 degrees for 1 to 1 1/2 hours until tender.
  5. It's done when a fork can be easily inserted into the fruit.
  6. Spoon out the cooked pumpkin separating it from the skin.

Photo Guide for Baking

Click thumbnail to view full-size
A turkey roasting pan works nicely to bake the quartered gourd.Remove the cooked quarters from the roasting pan.Place each section on a cutting board.Slice off the remaining stringy pulp interior.Discard the stringy part or put it in the compost bin.Spoon out the cooked fruit from the skin.Store in the refrigerator up to 3 days.
A turkey roasting pan works nicely to bake the quartered gourd.
A turkey roasting pan works nicely to bake the quartered gourd. | Source
Remove the cooked quarters from the roasting pan.
Remove the cooked quarters from the roasting pan.
Place each section on a cutting board.
Place each section on a cutting board.
Slice off the remaining stringy pulp interior.
Slice off the remaining stringy pulp interior.
Discard the stringy part or put it in the compost bin.
Discard the stringy part or put it in the compost bin.
Spoon out the cooked fruit from the skin.
Spoon out the cooked fruit from the skin.
Store in the refrigerator up to 3 days.
Store in the refrigerator up to 3 days.
Source

Cooked pumpkin can be refrigerated up to 3 days or stored in the freezer up to 6 months.

Time to Make the Pie

Now that the pumpkin is cooked and cooled, you're ready to begin making pies.

Gather all the ingredients into one area to be sure you have everything you need.

You can always use a prepared refrigerated or a frozen crust to make things simpler.

If you decide to make a crust from scratch, you'll need a clean, dry flour dusted surface to roll it, a rolling pin or a flat elongated bottle (like a wine bottle) or a smooth surfaced glass to use for flattening the dough.

Cook Time

Prep time: 1 hour 45 min
Cook time: 50 min
Ready in: 2 hours 35 min
Yields: 8 Servings

Ingredients

For the crust:

  • 1 1/4 cups flour, all-purpose, sifted
  • 6 tablespoons shortening, solid vegetable type
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 4 tablespoons water, cold

For the filling:

  • 1 1/2 cups pumpkin, cooked, cooled
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 to 1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon, ground
  • 1/2 to 1 teaspoon ginger, ground, dry
  • 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg, optional
  • 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon cloves, ground
  • 2 eggs, slightly beaten
  • 1 12 ounce can evaporated milk

Step 2: Make the Filling

  1. Line a deep dish 9" pie pan with the prepared pastry.
  2. Mix the dry ingredients in a small bowl.
  3. Add dry ingredients to the cooled pumpkin and mix together with a hand mixer, a potato masher or an emulsion blender.
  4. Add the evaporated milk and eggs to the mixture and combine.

Preparing the Filling

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Source

Filling the Uncooked Pie Crust

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Prepared uncooked pie crustPrepare three narrow strips of aluminum foil to protect the crust from burning.Wrap the outer edge of the crust to keep it from over-browning.Pouring in the fillingPlace the filled pie pan onto a foil-lined cookie sheet to keep the oven clean.
Prepared uncooked pie crust
Prepared uncooked pie crust | Source
Prepare three narrow strips of aluminum foil to protect the crust from burning.
Prepare three narrow strips of aluminum foil to protect the crust from burning.
Wrap the outer edge of the crust to keep it from over-browning.
Wrap the outer edge of the crust to keep it from over-browning.
Pouring in the filling
Pouring in the filling
Place the filled pie pan onto a foil-lined cookie sheet to keep the oven clean.
Place the filled pie pan onto a foil-lined cookie sheet to keep the oven clean.

Step 3: Assemble and Bake

  1. Cut three narrow strips of aluminum foil about 2 inches wide.
  2. Join the strips together at the short ends to form one long strip.
  3. Fold the long strip in half lengthwise
  4. Wrap the prepared crust with the joined strips of foil to prevent over browning.
  5. Place the foil-wrapped pie crust onto a cookie sheet to catch any spills.
  6. Carefully pour the liquid pumpkin mix into the center of the pie pan.
  7. Bake at 450 degrees F. for 10 minutes.
  8. Reduce heat to 375 degrees F. and continue baking for about 40-50 minutes.

Carefully pour the filling into the unbaked pie crust.
Carefully pour the filling into the unbaked pie crust. | Source
Ready to place on the cookie sheet and into the pre-heated oven.
Ready to place on the cookie sheet and into the pre-heated oven. | Source

Step 4: Serve and Enjoy!

Top each slice with whipped cream if desired and enjoy the compliments on a job well done.

Use the remaining cooked pumpkin for pumpkin bread, muffins, smoothies or in a souffle.

Pumpkin is low in calories, high in fiber, beta-carotene, contains vitamins A and C, Iron and even calcium.

Finished Pie

Click thumbnail to view full-size
There you go!Remove the foil after baking.Place the baked pie on a rack to cool.
There you go!
There you go!
Remove the foil after baking.
Remove the foil after baking. | Source
Place the baked pie on a rack to cool.
Place the baked pie on a rack to cool.
Source

Potassium 394 mg.

Nutrition Facts
Serving size: 1 Cup
Calories 30
Calories from Fat0
% Daily Value *
Fat 0 g
Saturated fat 0 g
Unsaturated fat 0 g
Carbohydrates 8 g3%
Sugar 3 g
Fiber 1 g4%
Protein 1 g2%
Cholesterol 0 mg
Sodium 1 mg
* The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, so your values may change depending on your calorie needs. The values here may not be 100% accurate because the recipes have not been professionally evaluated nor have they been evaluated by the U.S. FDA.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2019 Peg Cole

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    • PegCole17 profile imageAUTHOR

      Peg Cole 

      5 days ago from Northeast of Dallas, Texas

      Hi there, William,

      You don't have to be a baker to enjoy a slice of this pie. Here's one I saved for you and a nice fresh cup of coffee. Sit awhile and enjoy the view, won't you?

    • lifegate profile image

      William Kovacic 

      5 days ago from Pleasant Gap, PA

      I'm no baker, but it sounds easy enough, and of course, it looks delicious. When you get a chance, send me a slice.

    • PegCole17 profile imageAUTHOR

      Peg Cole 

      9 days ago from Northeast of Dallas, Texas

      Hello Shauna, Baking the pumpkin is easier but for someone like me who likes the orderly cubes, I like to boil it. It cooks a bit quicker and smells so delicious while it's stewing.

      I don't always cook pumpkin from scratch, but when I do. . . LOL

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 

      9 days ago from Central Florida

      Peggy, I love pumpkin pie but have never made it from fresh pumpkin. I was under the impression that it would be difficult. Now I see the hardest part is cutting the pumpkin! I would opt for your baking method. Less elbow grease involved!

      I'll have to consider using fresh pumpkin the next time I bake a pie. You've made it look so easy!

    • PegCole17 profile imageAUTHOR

      Peg Cole 

      9 days ago from Northeast of Dallas, Texas

      Hi Thelma, We're looking forward to cooler temperatures here and for the baking season to begin. Hope you enjoy this recipe. My hubby always makes the whipped cream.

    • Thelma Alberts profile image

      Thelma Alberts 

      10 days ago from Germany and Philippines

      I can already smell the pumpkin pie in my mind. It is time again to bake this pie. Your recipe is very easy to make and very well presented. Thank you for sharing. I would love to try this as soon as possible.

    • PegCole17 profile imageAUTHOR

      Peg Cole 

      12 days ago from Northeast of Dallas, Texas

      Hello Dianna, Yes it is! I can feel the temperatures dropping and am eager to begin baking again.

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 

      13 days ago

      It is that time again, isn't it? I forgot evaporated milk makes the texture richer. Thanks for sharing.

    • PegCole17 profile imageAUTHOR

      Peg Cole 

      2 weeks ago from Northeast of Dallas, Texas

      Thank you, Prasetio30. It's good to see you again.

    • PegCole17 profile imageAUTHOR

      Peg Cole 

      2 weeks ago from Northeast of Dallas, Texas

      Peggy, I haven't tried to make pumpkin soup. It sounds delicious. Hope you've shared the recipe.

    • prasetio30 profile image

      prasetio30 

      2 weeks ago from malang-indonesia

      It sound delicious. Thank you very much for sharing.

    • PegCole17 profile imageAUTHOR

      Peg Cole 

      2 weeks ago from Northeast of Dallas, Texas

      Hi Paula! I'm trying to reawaken the baker in me as well. Soon the weather will be more cooperative for turning on the oven. Thanks so much for coming by and for the thoughtful comment.

    • PegCole17 profile imageAUTHOR

      Peg Cole 

      2 weeks ago from Northeast of Dallas, Texas

      Hi Maria, Well thank you for visiting, now knowing that you are not a fan of pumpkin pie. Aunt Louise didn't much like it either. Her favorite was the chocolate cream pie I make at Thanksgiving. Anyhow, it was good to see you and have your keen eye on the instructions.

      Hope all is going well with you, too. J is recuperating quickly from his knee replacement and is doing a great job of it. One week out of the hospital and he is getting around like a champ.

      Love to you and yours.

    • PegCole17 profile imageAUTHOR

      Peg Cole 

      2 weeks ago from Northeast of Dallas, Texas

      Hello Chitrangada, Thank you so much for coming by to check this recipe out and for the thoughtful comment. Cheers!

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 

      2 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      We always purchase large pumpkins to put on our doorstep for decorations in the fall. I then always use them as an ingredient for soups, eating just the vegetable itself, or other things. For pumpkin pie, I have thus far always used the canned. Pumpkin is amazingly inexpensive in the fall and so good. Thanks for showing us how you use it to make the pie.

    • PegCole17 profile imageAUTHOR

      Peg Cole 

      2 weeks ago from Northeast of Dallas, Texas

      Hi Linda, I still use canned pumpkin when I'm pressed for time or I don't have any spare pumpkins around! But there's a certain satisfaction from making the whole thing from scratch. Nice of you to stop in. Thank you.

    • fpherj48 profile image

      Paula 

      2 weeks ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

      Peg...This is a PERFECTLY presented and very tempting recipe! I love pumpkin pie with tons of whipped cream. Now, all I need is to awaken the baker in me! I've had her in lock-up for quite a while!! I'm such a lazy old lady!! I need a kick in the..........! Thanks, this may just do it! Peace, Paula

    • marcoujor profile image

      Maria Jordan 

      2 weeks ago from Jeffersonville PA

      Hi dear Peg,

      I am not a fan of pumpkin pie. I'm wondering if it's because the ones I have tried have no doubt been from canned pumpkin?

      Your directions are detailed to perfection and the photography is appetizing, especially the finished product.

      Hoping all is well with you and yours. Happy "almost" Fall!

      Love,

      Maria

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image

      Chitrangada Sharan 

      2 weeks ago from New Delhi, India

      Such a well presented and well illustrated article about pumpkin pie.

      Your recipe sounds delicious and your pictures are wonderful and helpful. I don’t think, I have come across a better article than yours on pumpkin pie.

      Thanks for sharing and I would love to try this one.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 

      2 weeks ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thanks for sharing the instructions, Peg. Like Pamela, I generally use canned pumpkin. I appreciate the information and all of the photos in this article. I'm sure fresh pumpkin provides a much nicer taste than the canned version that I get.

    • PegCole17 profile imageAUTHOR

      Peg Cole 

      2 weeks ago from Northeast of Dallas, Texas

      Thanks, Pamela. It takes a bit of extra time to make the pumpkin filling but I love the taste of the fresh ingredients. I'm hungry for pie, too, along with the cooler temps so I can start baking again. Thanks so much for the kind words and for dropping by.

    • Pamela99 profile image

      Pamela Oglesby 

      2 weeks ago from Sunny Florida

      That pie looks so delicious. I have made plenty of pumpkin pies and your recipe similar to mine. However, I have always used canned pumpkin, but I imagine the taste is wonderful if you actually use use a fresh pumpkin.

      You have very thoroughly explained the directions for this process. Gosh, I wish I had a piece of pie to eat right now!

    • PegCole17 profile imageAUTHOR

      Peg Cole 

      2 weeks ago from Northeast of Dallas, Texas

      Bill, You are so right about the aroma of baked goods. We used to drive past a bread factory years ago when we lived in NJ and the smell was mouth-watering. In fact, I love it so much I've worn out a couple of bread makers. Nothing finer than warm, fresh bread. Unless it's a fresh baked pie! Hugs.

    • PegCole17 profile imageAUTHOR

      Peg Cole 

      2 weeks ago from Northeast of Dallas, Texas

      Hi Liz, I'm jumping the gun on cooler temperatures and fall baking. Thanks so much for the positive remarks and for dropping in on this recipe.

    • PegCole17 profile imageAUTHOR

      Peg Cole 

      2 weeks ago from Northeast of Dallas, Texas

      Hi Susan, Sometimes I save time by getting the roll out refrigerated crusts. They're nearly as good as homemade and a lot easier! Pie. Yum. Can't wait for baking weather.

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 

      2 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      is there a better smell than the smell of a freshly-baked pumpkin pie? Maybe fresh bread, but it's a toss-up between the two. Now I'm hungry for pumpkin pie, Peg. Thanks a lot!

    • Eurofile profile image

      Liz Westwood 

      2 weeks ago from UK

      This is a very seasonal recipe. Excellent instructions and illustrations along with useful tips.

    • Just Ask Susan profile image

      Susan Zutautas 

      2 weeks ago from Ontario, Canada

      Oh, your pie looks so good! I'm terrible at making homemade crust but I can always buy the frozen :)

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