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How to Make Swedish Rosette Cookies

Melanie has been interested in cultures, languages, and travel since her youth. She also runs a YouTube channel: The Curious Coder.

Yummy rose cookies dusted with confectioner's sugar

Yummy rose cookies dusted with confectioner's sugar

What Are Rosette Cookies?

Rosette cookies, sometimes called rose cookies, are very thin Swedish pastries that are fried using an iron. These irons come in a variety of shapes including stars, circles, and snowflakes. They often come in sets along with timbale irons (timbales are made using a very similar recipe and an almost identical technique).

The technique for making rosette cookies is to dip the iron in hot oil (to heat the iron), dip it into the batter, and then back into the hot oil (to fry the cookie). While rosettes can be difficult to make (especially if you've never made them before), they are very tasty and totally worth the effort! Your family will definitely be lining up while you make them!

Tools and Equipment

In order to make rosettes, you will need a few non-ingredient items:

  • Rosette iron with handle
  • Whisk
  • Butter knife
  • Slotted spoon
  • Cast-iron pan (or similar fry pan)
  • Plate with paper towels or mesh rack

Ingredients

  • 2 eggs
  • 1 Tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour, sifted
  • 1 cup milk
  • powdered sugar, optional
  • shortening
  1. Add enough shortening to the frying pan so that the oil is about two inches deep. Heat on medium while you make your batter.
  2. In a mixing bowl whisk together the eggs with the sugar and vanilla. While stirring, add a small amount of flour and a small amount of milk. Alternate between adding milk and flour until you've added all of both.
  3. The result should be a thin, lump-free batter. (You can also cheat by putting the ingredients in a blender, hitting the puree button, and pouring into a bowl. This is especially helpful if you don't have a sifter!)
  4. Let the batter sit for a while (15 minutes is fine) so that there are no bubbles. (This makes for more visually appealing cookies, so it's not really required).

Step 2: Fry the Rosettes

Pick out an iron shape that you like (in my experience, the star shape is the easiest) and attach it to the handle.

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  1. Dip the shape into the hot oil for about 10 seconds so it gets very hot. When you dip it into the batter, the heat from the iron will cause the batter to stick. If you find that the batter falls off the iron before you make it to the frying pan, it's a sign that the iron isn't hot enough.
  2. Dip the shape into the batter very carefully. The goal here is to dip it into the batter as deep as you can without the batter going over the top of the shape. If you accidentally cover the entire shape in batter, do not wash it off. An easier way to remove it is to just dip it back in the oil and fry it still attached to the iron. Then, over a trash can, use your butter knife to scrape it off.
  3. Dip the shape back into the oil to make your cookie. If you're lucky, the shape will easily fall off the iron. You can use your butter knife to nudge it from the iron. To increase the chance of it coming off the iron easily, make sure your oil is on medium. If it's too hot, it'll harden the batter before it has the chance to come off. (And again if it's not hot enough, the batter won't stick.)
  4. Using a slotted spoon, flip the cookie. Fry until it's a light golden brown and gently place it on your plate/mesh rack. Continue the process until you've made the desired number of cookies.

Lightly dust cookies with powdered sugar or serve with jam and enjoy within three hours. You can cover any remaining batter with plastic wrap and store it in the refrigerator.

Photo Guide

A rosette and timbale iron set

A rosette and timbale iron set

Shortening, yum!

Shortening, yum!

Sifting makes flour fluffy and gets rid of lumpy bits.

Sifting makes flour fluffy and gets rid of lumpy bits.

Lump-free batter

Lump-free batter

Heating the iron

Heating the iron

© 2012 Melanie Palen

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