Anzac Biscuit Recipe (An Australian Classic)

Updated on May 11, 2017
Rangoon House profile image

I am an idealist, an optimist, a romantic, often a traditionalist. I like to see and write about the good, or how things can become better.

What Is An Anzac Biscuit?

First of all, where I come from, cookies are called biscuits. So Anzac biscuits are a sweet treat, and fortunately, are nutritious as well.

Secondly, Anzac biscuits have historical significance in the Australian and New Zealand social make up, and I will share some of that story, in addition to providing the recipe for the biscuits in both metric and imperial measurements.

These cookies continue to be an Australian favourite, a century later from when they were first devised, to send to soldiers fighting in overseas campaigns during the First World War.

Anzac biscuits are certainly my favourite—I prefer the soft, moist variety to the hard, crunchy variety, and have yet to find any better than those my mother makes. They won't take any prizes for the most delectable looking sweet treat, but you need to try them to appreciate their goodness.

I have included my easy-to-follow recipe in both imperial and metric measurements and hope you enjoy these as much as I do.

Honour Wall At The Australian War Memorial

WWI Roll of Honour Wall at the Australian War Memorial, Canberra.
WWI Roll of Honour Wall at the Australian War Memorial, Canberra.

The Role Of The Anzac Biscuit In Australian History

ANZAC is the acronym for the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, which was established during the First World War.

The delicious Anzac biscuit was also developed during the First World War by the sweethearts, wives, and mothers of soldiers. The women who created the recipe needed it to meet some essential criteria, like traveling well by military ship to the other side of the world, not spoiling during the lengthy voyage, and not requiring eggs, which were in short supply due to the high number of poultry farmers at war themselves.

The home cooks back in Australia created the cookie mainly in response to complaints by soldiers about the quality of food at the front line. The women chose rolled oats as the main ingredient, due to the high nutritional value, and golden syrup to replace the binding qualities usually met by eggs.

Anzac Day is celebrated in Australia and New Zealand each year on 25 April. It is a national day of remembrance in both countries for all those who have served and fallen in wars, conflicts and peacekeeping operations since World War 1.

The enjoyment of these biscuits is certainly not limited to Anzac Day and has flourished for over a century. The greatest debate about Anzac biscuits is whether they should be baked soft and moist or hard and crunchy! I am firmly on the soft and moist team.

A Quick, Easy, Delicious Recipe For Anzac Biscuits

In Imperial And Metric Measurements

This is such a deliciously simple recipe. It is listed below with imperial and metric measurements so you can choose your preference. I hope you enjoy the making and the eating!

Imperial Measurements For Anzac Biscuits

  • 1 1/4 cups plain flour - sifted
  • 1 cup rolled oats
  • 1/2 cup caster sugar (maybe better known as Baker's Sugar where you live)
  • 3/4 cup desiccated coconut
  • 2 tablespoons golden syrup or treacle
  • 2/3 cup unsalted butter - chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

Metric Measurements For Anzac Biscuits

  • 1 1/4 cups plain flour - sifted
  • 1 cup rolled oats
  • 1/2 cup caster sugar (maybe better known as Baker's Sugar where you live)
  • 3/4 cup desiccated coconut
  • 2 tablespoons golden syrup or treacle
  • 150 g unsalted butter - chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

Instructions To Cook Anzac Biscuits

  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit or 165 degrees Celsius.
  2. Combine flour, oats, sugar and coconut in a large bowl.
  3. Place the golden syrup and butter in a small saucepan and stir over low heat until the butter has melted. Remove from heat. Mix the bicarbonate of soda with 1 1/2 tablespoons boiling water and add to the golden syrup mixture. Stir gently.
  4. Combine golden syrup/butter mixture with dry ingredients.
  5. Roll tablespoonfuls of mixture into balls and place on baking tray lined with non stick baking paper. Gently press down tops to flatten slightly.
  6. Bake for 10-12 minutes or until golden brown, depending on your personal choice for soft and moist or hard and crunchy.
Prep time: 15 min
Cook time: 10 min
Ready in: 25 min

Best Anzac Biscuit Recipe

5 stars from 2 ratings of The Best Anzac Biscuit Recipe

Questions & Answers

    © 2013 AJ

    I Hope You Enjoy Your Anzac Biscuits!

      0 of 8192 characters used
      Post Comment

      • Rangoon House profile imageAUTHOR

        AJ 

        21 months ago from Australia

        Hi Mary. Given that this recipe was improvised in the early 1900s, most likely by country women in Australia, I am pretty sure that most people would easily source the ingredients. I'm thrilled that you're keen to make them, and eager to hear how you like them. Enjoy!

      • Blond Logic profile image

        Mary Wickison 

        21 months ago from Brazil

        My husband had mentioned these before to me along with a condensed version of their history. I will make them.

        I love having recipes which use things I always have on hand. All too often I see a recipe and the ingredients aren't always easy to source, especially where I live.

      • Rangoon House profile imageAUTHOR

        AJ 

        21 months ago from Australia

        I hope you enjoy your Anzac Biscuits Marlene.

      • MarleneB profile image

        Marlene Bertrand 

        21 months ago from USA

        Oh yes. I will definitely try this. I enjoyed reading about the history of this biscuit, which you are right; here where I live it is called a cookie.

      • Rangoon House profile imageAUTHOR

        AJ 

        3 years ago from Australia

        Hi Peachy. I hope you do try this recipe. The oats are the hero of the recipe, so you definitely need to add them. The cookies won't turn hard because of the oats, but just keep an eye on the cooking time if you prefer them soft and moist like I do. Good luck!

      • peachpurple profile image

        peachy 

        3 years ago from Home Sweet Home

        i must try this, i love your recipe, but if i put in oats, will the cookies turn hard?

      working

      This website uses cookies

      As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, delishably.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

      For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://delishably.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

      Show Details
      Necessary
      HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
      LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
      Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
      AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
      Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
      CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
      Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
      Features
      Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
      Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
      Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
      Marketing
      Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
      Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
      Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
      Statistics
      Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
      ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)