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Review of Boomerang's Traditional Beef (Pot Pie)

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Fin lives in California's Central Valley. He enjoys writing food reviews.

Boomerang's Traditional Beef is pot pie with an Aussie twist

Boomerang's Traditional Beef is pot pie with an Aussie twist

Australian Style Pot Pie

Pot pies are a convenient and tasty way to consume your nutrients. Traditionally, they consist of a protein such as chicken or beef, along with vegetables in a savory gravy. These ingredients are conveniently tucked inside a pastry shell and resemble a portable sandwich.

Chicken and turkey are probably two of the more popular varieties in the United States, but you can use virtually any meat—or none at all.

When grocery shopping recently, I came across a product that was completely new to me: Boomerang's Traditional Beef. According to the packaging, this product was inspired by an Australian version of the pot pie. It can apparently be removed from the bowl and carried like a hoagie.

The American version of beef pot pie

The American version of beef pot pie

Personally, I've never been a fan of beef pot pie—although I don't have a problem with chicken or turkey. I never thought that beef made a good ingredient for a pie, and the beef gravy wasn't my favorite, either.

When I saw Boomerang's Traditional Beef in the store, I wondered what "traditional" meant in Australian terms. Was it a reference to the preferred protein that is used in their meat pies? Or is there a special preparation for beef that makes it more traditional?

The packaging sure looked appealing, though. What also grabbed my attention was the description of the "puff pastry," which is one of the reasons pies appeal to me in the first place.

This is what the frozen pie looks like when you take it out of the packaging.

This is what the frozen pie looks like when you take it out of the packaging.

The Crust

Like other frozen pot pies I've purchased, the pie is not covered in any plastic when you take it out of the box. I'm not quite sure why is, because most TV dinners are covered with some variation of saran wrap.

I cooked mine in an air fryer because most things seem to do well in one. I placed it in the microwave for about three minutes, just to make sure everything was heated properly after letting it sit in the fryer.

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What struck me first of all was the fact that the crust did puff up, like a pastry. I found this very appealing. It was golden brown and flaky, and it came apart in thin sheets.

The crust was golden brown and flaky, and it came apart in thin sheets.

The crust was golden brown and flaky, and it came apart in thin sheets.

History of Pot Pies

The pot pie is believed to have originated in Ancient Greece and were called Artocreas. An Artocreas is different than the present-day pot pie in that this featured an open pastry shell, but still had a combination of protein and vegetables. The settlers who came to America in the 18th century took their pot pie recipes with them when they moved west. This is a great example of how American food developed because of immigrants and their recipes from the homeland, and we appreciate it!

— Food History Friday: Pot Pies

Cutting open the pot pie

Cutting open the pot pie

Beef Filling

When it came to the beef, I had some reservations. I was concerned that it might be a little too exotic since it was from Australia. I wasn't sure by looking at it if it was shredded, mashed, or sliced either. There wasn't much gravy and the aroma was indistinct.

When I took my first few bites, I was relieved to find it palatable. However, overall, it was sort of bland. There wasn't much beef flavor, and the limited amount of sauce had the flavor of lukewarm water.

The beef was pretty tender and easy to eat. I still don't know if it was shredded or sliced—or if was really beef at all.

boomerangs-traditional-beef-pot-pie

Overall Impressions

I think this product makes a good snack, but it certainly doesn't have the ingredients to make a well-rounded meal. A lot of crust—some of it thick and soft, some of it crispy and flaky—makes up most of this pie.

You could probably pick it up and eat it like a turnover (or calzone), that's for sure.

  • Pros: It has good visual appeal and doesn't taste bad. It can stave off those food cravings for a couple of hours. The top crust is like a pastry and is actually pretty good.
  • Cons: It needs a little salt or some other herb to give it some flavor. A little more meat and less crust would have been nice, as well as more gravy.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2022 Finn

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