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How to Freeze Fresh Pears

Buster began cooking as a wee pup by watching his mother fix the kibble. He was hooked. He loves preparing—and writing about—food.

Freezing pears is a great way to preserve them so that they last a long time.

Freezing pears is a great way to preserve them so that they last a long time.

It's so easy to preserve pears in your freezer. I love a delicious pear and when they start coming into season, they're everywhere. We have friends with trees and they give us boxes full of them.

It's a fast and easy process.

How to Know When They're Ripe

When my neighbor gives me a box of Bartlett pears, some will be green, while others will be perfectly ripe.

"Perfectly ripe" pears have a slight yellow'ish color, and the skin can be barely pressed with a finger. Don't let them get too ripe. If you're unsure, take a bite.

Since they ripen unevenly, putting them into the freezer is the easiest way to handle them.

Ahhh, Fresh Pears!

how-to-freeze-fresh-pears

Prepare Your Pears

Using a potato peeler, peel the pears, then slice them in half. I use a melon baller to scoop out the seeds, then my paring knife to remove the "stem" that extends into the pear. You'll see it when you slice into the pear.

Cut the pears into slices. Sometimes I'll do a batch with thinly sliced pears (for making pies and tarts) or roughly chopped pieces (for making cobblers.)

But you will need to slice them. Pear halves creates bulky packages in your freezer, and don't seem to freeze very well.

Fill a large pot with water and squeeze a lemon into it.

As you slice the pears, drop them into the lemon water. The acid of the lemon will keep them fresh and white until you're ready for the next step.

If I'm working with a few gallons of pears, I'll peel, core and slice all of them into my lemon water before moving on to the next step. If I have several boxes full, then once I have my pot half full of pears I move on to the next step.

You'll see that freezing pears is incredibly easy.

The Next Steps

You'll want to add one tablespoon of Fruit-Fresh to every four cups of pears. Then add 2/3 cup of sugar to each four cups of pears.

Here's how I do it: I use a measuring cup to remove the pears from the lemon water, and strain them through a colander. After I have four cups of (drained) pears I put them into a bowl and add the FruitFresh and the sugar.

By the way, if you don't have Fruit-Fresh (which is available at grocery stores as ascorbic acid) you can squeeze half of a lemon onto them. The lemon (or Fruit-Fresh) preserves their color. The sugar, by the way, helps to preserve them.

And Into the Freezer

I use quart freezer bags. Make sure you write the date on the bag. I also write where the pears came from. Once they're frozen you won't be able to tell one pear from another.

I put 2 cups into each quart bag, press out the air, then lay them flat on the counter.

Once I have 4 or 5 bags then I stack them carefully in the freezer. Once they're frozen you can move the bags to another part of the freezer. You'll be glad you took this step of freezing them flat. They'll stack much easier later.

Final Thoughts

And that's all there is to it.

Pretty easy, huh?

The pears will keep for up to a year in your freezer.

Use them just like fresh pears—for cobblers, pies or tarts. I usually take out two bags and put them in my refrigerator to thaw, then later I'll make my dough for the pies, pour the thawed pears into it, and pop it into the oven. It's so easy—and we get to enjoy the fresh taste of pears year-round.

Make sure your pears are completely thawed before putting them into your pies or cobblers. If they're still half frozen, it'll make your crust soggy. This is the voice of experience.

I hope this information helps you to preserve your pears for year-round eating.

Questions & Answers

Question: Can one use Truvia instead of sugar when freezing pears?

Answer: Sugar is a natural preservative, so fruits tend to last longer when it's used.

But you can freeze fruits without sugar, or you can use Truvia. In this case, try to use the frozen pears within six months.

Question: We sliced and froze pears last year. We did not blanche or cook them. They're brown. Are pears preserved without blanching or cooking safe to eat?

Answer: It's impossible for me to know. This year, include an acid (like lemon juice) or FruitFresh (ascorbic acid) to prevent browning. The cooking process kills an enzyme and keeps the fruit good to eat for up to a year.

Question: Can I puree fresh pears and freeze them and make pear butter later?

Answer: Yes, you can. Add in the sugar before you freeze them -- sugar acts as a preservative. My mom freezes fruit juices all the time to make jelly later.

Question: Can frozen pear slices be used to make pear juice?

Answer: If your primary interest is having pear juice, I would juice the pears while they're fresh. Bring the juice to a boil, then bring to room temperature. Put into freezer bags and lay them carefully in the freezer (so they freeze in easy-to-stack packages.)

When you want pear juice, it's in your freezer. Frozen juice will last about one year. Don't forget to label and date your packages.

But to your question: yes, you can get juice from frozen pears but I would think (I've never done it before) that you'd get less than if you tried the suggestion at the opening of my answer.

Question: Can you freeze whole pears in skin?

Answer: Pears need to be peeled. (The skin becomes leathery in the freezer.)

Question: How thick/thin should the slices be to flash freeze pears?

Answer: I slice them about 1/4 inch thick, more or less. You could slice them thicker but I wouldn't go larger than, oh, about 2/3 inch thick.

Why the difference? It depends on how you'll use the frozen pears. If you'll use them for cobblers, then thicker is fine. If you plan to use them for tarts, you'll want them thinner.

Question: How do you measure pears that have been halved? Are you slicing them also?

Answer: The pears should be sliced, not left in halves. They freeze better that way and are easier to store in your freezer.

Comments

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on November 12, 2019:

Yes, Emma, I've never had a soggy crust... and I do love a pear pie!

Thanks so much for writing --

Buster

emma williams on November 12, 2019:

i always freezed them as she suggested. When I take out of freezer for pies, etc., I put them in a pot, {frozen} and cook for few minutes. Never have had soggy crust. Friends tell me they think my pies are "wonderful". HAPPY HOLIDAYS AND BAKING TO ALL!

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on October 08, 2018:

Hi S&G,

Unlike, say, apples that have 100s of varieties in the U.S., there are only about 10 pear types here.

You can see images of them by going here:

https://usapears.org/pear-varieties/

Underneath the photos, you'll see how to determine when they're ripe so you can begin freezing them.

Good luck! Thanks so much for writing to me.

Buster

S&G on October 07, 2018:

Hello, Thank you so much for your information. I don't know what kind they are, but have 2 abundant pear trees. They are still quite hard. Living in northern Indiana, how will I know when it's a good time to start freezing them. This will be a great way to not let them go to waste, although the deer will be disappointed, haha

Thank you, appreciate your advice.

Missy Vette on October 07, 2017:

Thank you! I was looking for a quick way to do the pears my daughter brought me. I have already canned pears and vanilla pears and made pear brandy. This was so simple and easy to do. On a whim I thought I would see if you can freeze pears and came upon your sight. Thanks again.

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on June 28, 2017:

Hi Dianne,

Yes, I've done that before and it works. If you add cinnamon then you can just make crust for cobbler, pour the contents of the jar into your baking pan, put on your lattice crush and you're good to go.

:-)

Best regards,

Buster

Dianne Ryden on June 27, 2017:

I've heard that you can do exactly what did, but add cinnamon to the sugar so that you can turn your pears into an"apple pie"? Have you ever tried this?

dianneryden@yahoo.com

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on September 26, 2016:

Hi Danielle,

The sugar acts as a preservative, as well as preserving sweetness. One time I tried freezing them without sugar but they didm't last long. I had to throw some of the bags away. If you decide to skip the sugar, I would eat them within a month. (But when I freeze pears, I have too many to eat within a month, so I always use sugar.)

Best of luck!

Buster

danielle on September 26, 2016:

can you freeze pears without any sugar?

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on September 03, 2013:

Hi Cyndy,

Yes, you can use Splenda/ sugar substitute.

Two things: you'll want to use your pears within about 10 months or so. (The substitutes don't have the preservative qualities if sugar.)

Thanks for writing --

Buster

Cyndy on September 03, 2013:

There are 2 diabetics in my house. Can I substitute sugar with Splenda (or generic form of)?

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on September 01, 2013:

Hello Dick,

Yes, you can use Fruit-Fresh to put yours pears in the freezer until your apples are ready. When cider-making time arrives, simply add the defrosted pears to your apples and begin cooking then down for your cider.

Thanks,

Buster

Dick on September 01, 2013:

Want to use pears with apples for cider. Apples are not ready. Can I just freeze "Fruit-Freshed" pear halves in bags until cider time--without putting them in lemon water and without removing the seeds?

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on September 15, 2012:

Hi Jodi,

Yes, the acid of lemons prevents discoloring of the fruit. Without it, the pears will turn brown.

Good luck with your pears!

Buster

Jodi on September 15, 2012:

Hi there- I'm planning on freezing my pears today, but I don't have a lemon. Is putting the pears in the lemon water a crucial step?

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on August 10, 2012:

Hi Cherie,

What you freeze is what you get when you defrost them. Since frozen pears should be used for baking, I think freezing them now would be a good idea. When I'm baking pear pies from fresh, I use slightly underripe pears (though with lots of flavor and sweetness, of course.)

Good luck!

Buster

cherie on August 09, 2012:

do the pears have to be soft to freeze them? I have access to mega pears but will be on vacation when they are real ripe...can I pick them now and freeze them? I tasted them and they are really sweet just not soft yet...

pamaro on April 04, 2012:

thanks for taking the time and posting now my pears won't go to waste.

God Bless.

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on October 24, 2011:

Hi Doreen,

"Fruit fresh" and "pectin" are different things.

Pectin helps fruit to jell.

"Fruit fresh" is ascorbic acid, and helps fruit maintain it's fresh color by preventing the browning process.

Thanks so much for taking the time to write!

Best regards,

Buster

Doreen from Idaho on October 24, 2011:

Might sound like a 'northern question' :)

Is fruit fresh the same as fruit pectin? I use SureJell for my berry jams and wasn't sure if it was what you meant. Thanks in advance!

collette N.Ireland on October 19, 2011:

glad to hear how to freeze pears as i was given lots and i do not like to waste any food so shall not b now. t u

Louisa on October 18, 2011:

Thanks so much for this! My husband tonight bought me the wonderful gift of 37 pears from a garden where he is working, and I was looking for a quick and easy way to store them - looks like I found it!

Dawn on October 06, 2011:

Thank you for taking the trouble to post this - I am a novice at doing stuff with fruit as its my first ever garden with fruit trees, and I really love pears :)

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on September 25, 2011:

Hi Carol,

No, the skins need to be peeled from the pears before freezing. If you leave the skins on, the skins become chewy and unpleasant -- kind of a "gritty" sensation in the mouth.

I know it's a headache to peel the pears, but it's necessary for freezing them.

Thanks for taking the time to write -- and good luck with your pears.

Best regards,

Buster

Carol on September 25, 2011:

I wondered if you could leave the skins on the pears when you freeze them?

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on September 01, 2011:

Hi Dee,

I'm envious that you have so many pears! I think you'll choose to freeze pears from now on. Though I have a recipe for canning pears, I always freeze mine. It's easier, faster, and they're just as good.

:-)

Best regards,

Buster

Dee on August 31, 2011:

Wow, Thank you so much Buster for the helpful info. Who would of known that you could freeze a pear. I canned pears for 5 hrs yesterday and only yielded 6 quts. Wish I would have thought of my question yesterday!! So now I can freeze the remaining 60 lbs I have. Thanks again and have a great day!! :)

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on August 28, 2011:

Hi Theresa,

Glad you'll be able to put up all those pears. Thanks for taking the time to write to me.

Best regards,

Buster

Theresa on August 28, 2011:

I have found this site very useful,being of the older generation I was a bit dubious, but my tree full of pears now will not go to waste , many thanks

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on August 27, 2011:

Hi Janeen,

Thanks so much for taking the time to write!

Best regards,

Buster

Janeen on August 27, 2011:

Thanks so much, Buster! This helps a lot! Great site you have here!

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on August 27, 2011:

Hi Janeen,

Yes, sometimes I freeze fruits (while they're perfectly ripe) when I know I don't have time to make jams or preserves. Later, when I have time, I defrost the fruits and... off I go.

:-)

I usually decrease the sugar by about a half cup. If you're making a small batch of preserves, you could reduce it by only 1/4 cup.

Good luck!

Buster

Janeen on August 27, 2011:

I use the southern "sand" pear for homemade preserves. I want to freeze some to make preserves later. Any suggestions on how to estimate how much sugar to use at the time of preserve-making since some is used in the freezing process? Thanks!

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on August 23, 2011:

Hi Jacqueline and Sandra,

Jacqueline: I've never eaten a Concorde pear, but I've heard they're really delicious. You're lucky your tree produces so many fruit!

Sandra: Yes, this recipe is really easy. Don't you love the look of the bags of frozen pears in the freezer?

:-)

Thanks for taking the time to comment.

Best regards,

Buster

Sandra on August 23, 2011:

WOW Thank you! My mom gave me a huge box of pears from her tree and I groaned! Now I can't wait for her trees to bear next year! This was/is a terrific recipe and EASY. Thank you thank you!

jacqueline on August 23, 2011:

Many thanks for your pear preserving tips, I have a 'concord' pear tree in my garden in Norfolk, U.K. and it produces freely! So it's pear wine, freezing and perhaps bottling. Last year I cooked them with spices before freezing, but lemon juice is a good addition: brown pears are not too enticing.

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on August 04, 2011:

Hi Joan,

Yes, you can easily freeze cooked, diced pears. The way you've prepared them is great!

My mom uses peaches she's put up in the freezer, apples, and pears for making fried pies.

I love 'em!

Good luck, and thanks for taking the time to write.

Best regards,

Buster

Joan on August 04, 2011:

Buster,

I am sorry that I didn't read my commment before posting. I want to freeze diced pears that have already been cooked. I peeled them and added Fruit Fresh to them and sugar and splenda and cinnimon. I would like to put some in freezer bags and freeze. Wuold this be a safe way to use them. I love to make fried pear pies. Thanks Joan from Ga

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on July 25, 2011:

Hello Joan,

Glad the recipe was helpful.

Yes, you can defrost the pears and make pear butter. When fruits are coming into season, I don't have time to make all of the jams/jellies I would like, so freezing is a great way to capture all of that goodness, while still making jam (or pear butter!) "later down the road."

Thanks so much for writing to me.

Best regards,

Buster

Joan on July 25, 2011:

Buster Bucks

Thank you for the frozen pear receipe. Can you make pear butter from the frozen pears? Frezzing the pears was so easy. Thank you again,

Joan From GA

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on July 25, 2011:

Hello Faye,

We have friends who live on the next hill with pear trees that produce so many fruits the limbs droop to the point of breaking. They put supports under the limbs. How wonderful to have so many pears!

Your pear dumpling idea sounds a lot like a cobbler my grandmother used to make with blackberries -- she'd drop her dumplings directly into boiling blackberries, then the whole thing was poured into a baking dish... more strips of dough were arranged on top and it was baked. Thanks for reminding me of it.

Best regards,

Buster

faye on July 25, 2011:

thanks so much..our tree has so many pears it is breaking the limbs..i usually try to preserve them but i wanted to try and freeze some..i make pear dumplings with mine..you just use pears instead of chicken..thanks again

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on October 17, 2010:

Hi Debbie,

Yes, they do!

You'll enjoy cooking with pears -- they're wonderful in cobblers, pies, warmed and put on top of pancakes, or baked into sweet bread, and so on.

Thanks for writing --

Buster

debbie on October 17, 2010:

Will the pears taste just as good using them right out of the freezer (after thawing, of course). I've not cooked with pears, although I may have to try that. Thank you!

Janis on October 14, 2010:

Thanks for the great info. Would love to have your pear/apple cobbler recipe, only saw the peach recipe here.

Can't wait to make the pear bread as well!

Janis

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on October 12, 2010:

Hi Michelle,

Water? No.

However (and perhaps this is what you meant) the prepared pears will extrude some juice because of the sugar.

When I scoop out my two cups of pears, I always include a little bit of that juice in the bag.

Make sure you squeeze the air out of the freezer bags before you seal them.

Good luck!

Buster

michelle on October 12, 2010:

Do i put water in the freezer bags with my pears?

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on October 06, 2010:

Hi Allan,

Yes, this process works for all types of pears. You're lucky to have so many pears this year!

Thanks for taking the time to write -- good luck.

Buster

Allan Douglas from Great Smoky Mountains, Tennessee on October 06, 2010:

My pear trees are just loaded with pears and they are now ripe. This year I want to preserve more than just what we can eat (and give away)so your tips will come in very handy. Thanks!

BTW: mine are not Bartlets - they're a hard pear for cooking; Seckel or Bosc maybe. I assume the same process will work on mine.

Pam on October 04, 2010:

Thanks Buster!! I have 2 pear trees that produced so well this year that even my neighbors are sick of pears!! I'm glad I found your page!!

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on September 24, 2010:

Hi Sandy,

Yes, there's syrup left in the bowl. You're smart to use it for lemonade, what a great idea.

So glad your pears turned out nicely for you. Thanks so much for writing!

All the best,

Buster

Sandy C on September 24, 2010:

Great instuctions, worked wonderful. After I spooned the pears into the freezer bags I had syrup left over in the bowl. I used it with my prepackaged lemonade mix so nothing went to waste!

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on September 23, 2010:

Hi Sandy,

I've now included the links. I have another article here and THAT one had the links! Thanks for bringing this to my attention.

Best regards,

Buster

Sandy on September 22, 2010:

Thanks for the freezing recipe. The rest of the mentioned recipes, bread, cobbler seem to be missing. Any suggestions?

I appreciate your dedication to educating us.

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on September 19, 2010:

Hi Sandy,

In "The Next Steps" that cup is full of pears that you've removed from the water. I've now revised that sentence to make it clearer.

As our best teachers used to say: "there are no stupid questions."

:-)

Good luck to you, and thanks for writing.

Buster

Sandy on September 19, 2010:

I'm new at this and a little confused about "The Next Step". This may sound like a stupid question, but what do you do with the cup of liquid that you remove?

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on September 16, 2010:

Hi Tanya,

Every year I put some fruit in the freezer, make some into jams and jellies, and some I put into jars.

If I had more freezer space, I think I'd freeze more, but... we work with what we have, right?

Thanks for your encouragement, Tanya.

Buster

Tanya on September 16, 2010:

Thank You for your article! It is obvious that there are a lot of people with the same interests and desire to preserve their fruit and haven't grown up in a family that has done that and passed down the great tradition. Thank You for your ease in instruction and thoughtful advice. I had no idea you could freeze pears. I have pears and am deciding which way to go. Maybe both ways. Keep on sharing your talents and gifts from God!

W David Griggs on September 14, 2010:

To see if your pear is ready for harvest.... lift up the pear at a 90 degree angle to the stem... if it falls into your hands its ready.... if not... leave it on the tree. (fallen fruit all around the tree means... hurry up)

Store the freshly picked pears in your frig for 24 hours, then set on counter for 6 days. Gently pressing around the stem end should show a slight 'yield' in the fruit.... READY TO EAT. (or can or freeze).

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on September 09, 2010:

Hi Rachel,

It varies, but you should begin having ripe pears within 3 - 6 days. The pears will ripen here and there, so wait until you have enough ripe ones to use the recipe above.

Thanks for writing -- and good luck!

Buster

Rachel on September 09, 2010:

hi there!! I think I have Bosc pears... they are all pretty hard (just started picking them today)... any guess as to how long they need to ripen? (on average?)

Thanks :D

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on September 07, 2010:

Hi JJ,

Press them gently with your finger. If the skin gently gives, then the pears are ripe.

I've never frozen pears without sugar, so the following is my best guess:

Yes, you can freeze pears without sugar. However, since sugar acts as a preservative, you will probably want to use your frozen pears within 3 or 4 months. I'm not sure they would last as long without the sugar.

Good luck, and thanks for writing --

Buster

J J on September 07, 2010:

How do I know if my pears are ripe enough to freeze? And, also, I am diabetic so I wondered if not using any sugar at all will make a difference in the freezing? Thanks.

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on September 06, 2010:

Hi Linda,

Pears are hard because they're not ripe. It is important that you freeze *ripe* pears, otherwise you're going to open a bag from the freezer and discover... hard unripe pears.

Once they're ripe, and you slice them, they will exude juice (the sugar will also cause them to produce juice) and so you will have a syrup around your pears, not dry sugar.

I hope this helps!

Good luck --

Buster

Linda on September 06, 2010:

I also am new to freezing pears. Our pears are hard, but we were told that our pears are supposed to be hard ...so my question to you regarding your recipe is- after putting the fruit fresh or lemon juice on them and measuring out the sugar - is there no liquid involved here? It sounds to me like there will be dry sugar in the bag, or what should I expect?

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on September 04, 2010:

Thanks for the encouragement, Scamp, and good luck with those pears!

All the best,

Buster

Scamp on September 04, 2010:

Thanks so much for the quick and easy recipe for freezing pears. I have tons and this is after giving all my neighbours bags of pears. I am not a very good cook so a recipe like this is WONDERFUL FOR PEOPLE LIKE ME. Keep up the good work.

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on August 29, 2010:

Hi Ladyface,

I'm envious of those old pear trees!

Good luck putting them in the freezer -- you'll love having fresh pears to eat all year long.

All the best,

Buster

L a d y f a c e on August 29, 2010:

This is wonderful! I just bought a house that has two massive (have to be at least 30 years old) pear trees COVERED in fruit. I've never had fruit trees before, and really don't want them to go to waste (I ripened one and tried it - soooo good).

Thanks so much for your info. I'm really not prepared to do canning - I'm not even fully unpacked.

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on August 29, 2010:

Hi Kimi,

You are SO right! You're preserving, and serving, fresh wholesome food that actually costs less than what you get at the grocery store.

What's not to like?

:-)

Thanks so much for taking the time to write.

All the best,

Buster

Kimi on August 27, 2010:

Hi, I am so thankful for sites like yours. I am just starting to can and preserve items and have found so many useful sites like yours. I have found in these hard times that preserving and freezing fresh items when they are cheaper and in season, for later, saves my family alot of money. Thank you for sharing your tips and ideas. The Green Family

Bonnie on August 17, 2010:

Thanks for the pear bread recipe and the info on how to freeze pears. Have a pear tree and it's loaded with pears this year. Already picked some and will freeze as many as I can this year using your advice.

Losetta on August 16, 2010:

Thanks, very good information.

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on August 16, 2010:

Hi Josie,

Yes, I have lots of pears, too... and freezing helps me use/preserve all that extra bounty.

:-)

Thanks so much for writing --

Buster

Josie on August 16, 2010:

Hi there, I live in France and have always struggled to use up the glut of pears we get each year. After bottling, pickling, chutney, jam etc there always seem to be tonnes left over. Everyone around here also has pears so I can't even give them away so this advice about how to freeze them is superb - Hooray, no more wasted pears. Thank you.

Gary of Michigan on August 15, 2010:

Also, frozen pears are a great ingredient for homemade sorbet or fruit shakes. High natural sugar content makes them ideal for a post-workout shake supplement.

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on July 23, 2010:

Hi Rotgirl,

Good luck with your pears! It really is wonderful to have fresh-tasting pears the entire year.

Thanks so much for taking the time to write --

Buster

Rotgirl on July 22, 2010:

After getting substantial damage from Hurricane Rita, our pear tree FINALLY produced abundantly this year.

We're trying this today.

I can't wait to be able to have pear cobbler all year round!

Thanks for posting these easy to understand directions!

Sandra M Urquhart from Fort Lauderdale on July 11, 2010:

Oh man! That sounds great! Only thing you failed to do, was give us the recipe for your pear pie! I'mma fan!

maree on April 10, 2010:

l just picked some very drey pears from the tres with no juice in them, however l boiled them and made a suryp they were yummy although very sweet. Does anybody know of a nice pear juice l could have

Maree

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on October 28, 2009:

Hey there,

Freezing doesn't affect the texture -- you can thaw them and use them in any dessert you want. As to eating them out of the bag... it depends on your taste. Why not give it a try?

:-)

Buster

WONDERING on October 27, 2009:

WHAT DOES FREEZING DO TO THE TEXTURE OF THE PEAR? CAN WE JUST THAW OUT A BAG AND EAT THEM-OR ARE THEY JUST MUSH?

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on October 25, 2009:

Hi Diana,

I don't have any expertise in this area.

A friend of mine dragged a water hose to his tree and sprayed the water (the "shower" type, rather than a long blast of water) and that caused many of them to fly away, and of course the ones who were hit with water weren't able to fly.

I have no idea whether this would work for you or not. Obviously, bug spray is a no-no!

Thanks for writing --

Buster

Diana Hudson on October 24, 2009:

I have pears to pick but Waspers are on them. How do I kill the Waspers? I am afraid i will get stinged.

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on October 11, 2009:

Hi Bert,

Do you know how the apple peel becomes tough if you leave it on the counter? That's what happens to it in the freezer. Obviously, try whatever you'd like, but...

:-)

Hi Susie,

Glad you found the pear info -- good luck!

Buster

Susie on October 11, 2009:

I live in Cambridge, UK and have been searching for ways to preserve the glut of pears I have this year, stumbled across your site,wonderful keep on with the good work

Bert62 on October 09, 2009:

OMG, I have another idea/question. My wife got an apple peeler-corer from a kitchen party group, "PC." Could I freeze the whole coily-orb just the way it comes off of the spinner? I could cut it up when I'm ready to use it. I'll even consider giving it a lemon juice and/or ascorbic acid bath. Let me know.

Bert62 on October 09, 2009:

Hi, Buster.

Thanks for the advice. I guess I'll find out in January. I suspect they'' all turn brown, but that didn't bother me, theoretically. As you said, the skin may be a problem. If I have to I can use all I have previously frozen as a sort of apple pulp for apple bread, or cake. I can put in the Mouli. At least I'll have a tasty, nutritious quick bread. I have more "seconds" so, I can also try freezing them in the tried-and-true way. Incidentally, we also have a quince tree. I have been cutting up little pieces and just freezing them (in foodsaver vac-bags). I cut off all the skins. I guess I thought I could just cook the quince chunks when I am ready to use them. I hope it works. It appears I have a lot to learn. Thanks, Bert

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on October 09, 2009:

Hi Bert,

Why don't you write to me in about 4 months or so and let me know how they're doing? Will they turn brown? Become mushy in an odd non-appley way? I'm not sure...

As to the skins -- they tend to get chewy if they're left on the apples then frozen. Four Seasons aside, even Moosewooders tend to shy from chewy, stringy skins.

:)

Hope to hear from you!

Buster

Bert62 from Middle-of-Nowhere, U.S.A. on October 09, 2009:

Hi,

a friend from work who's very farmy told me to just cut up apples and freeze them - using no sugar or lemon of any kind. So, I cut up a bunch of cheap "seconds" apples and put them into foodsaver bags and froze them. I don't expect them to be beautiful. I'll just use them for crisps, mushy pies, cobblers and breads. Are they going to be acceptable the way I did them? Oh, I also kept most of the skins on, unless they needed trimming. I thought the skin was an important nutrient and fiber source. Anything I plan to make will be much more Moosewood than Four Seasons. Thanks for any advice.

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on October 07, 2009:

Hi Rochelle,

I'm glad to hear your tree produced a bumper crop this year!

Thanks for taking the time to write.

Buster

Rochelle Frank from California Gold Country on October 06, 2009:

Just in time-- my kitchen table is filled with ripening pears. Our pear tree decided it was a good year to produce. Thanks for the tips.

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on October 06, 2009:

Hi JoAnn,

Yes, they can be used in breads. Make sure you let them fully defrost before adding them to your batter. I usually put them into a large pan, (still in their freezer bag) and cover them with hot water. After about 20 minutes pour this water off, add more hot water, and wait another 10 minutes or so. You'll be able to feel when they're defrosted.

Then use them!

By the way, if you let them defrost and then let -- oh, say, 8 hours pass -- you may find that your fruit has discolored a little bit. It doesn't hurt the quality of the fruit, but in baked goods I want the fruit to look appetizing. This is why I defrost in hot water, over a short'ish amount of time.

Thanks for writing --

Buster

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on October 06, 2009:

Hi JoAnn,

Yes, they can be used in breads. Make sure you let them fully defrost before adding them to your batter. I usually put them into a large pan, (still in their freezer bag) and cover them with hot water. After about 20 minutes pour this water off, add more hot water, and wait another 10 minutes or so. You'll be able to feel when they're defrosted.

Then use them!

By the way, if you let them defrost and then let -- oh, say, 8 hours pass -- you may find that your fruit has discolored a little bit. It doesn't hurt the quality of the fruit, but in baked goods I want the fruit to look appetizing. This is why I defrost in hot water, over a short'ish amount of time.

Thanks for writing --

Buster

kathme on October 06, 2009:

Hi

thanks for recipe which I was searching web for and looks good but what are cups? Do they relate to weights or volumes?

JoAnn Notgrass on October 05, 2009:

Can frozen pears be used in making breads--like apples and such?

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on September 25, 2009:

Hi Kath,

I'm not a fan of pickling pears either.

;-)

Thanks for taking the time to write. Good luck!

Buster

kath on September 25, 2009:

i am so glad i found you, all the other sights i have looked at all want to pickle pears, i want sweet pears and the way you do then looks so easy so i can now preserve my pears and eat then as they should be eaten all year round , thank you so much

Buster Bucks (author) from Sonoma County, California on September 23, 2009:

Hello May,

"Without the internet"...? I can't even think about it.

;-)

Thanks so much for taking the time to write -- I hope those pears turn out beautifully for you.

You can use the frozen pears as you would fresh pears -- in cobblers and pies, etc. Check back here, if you like. I'm planning to write a couple of my pear recipes into these hubs soon.

Warmest regards,

Buster

May on September 23, 2009:

Where would I be without the internet? I have just picked the last crop of rhubarb, apples & raspberries from my garden in the UK this morning and have frozen them for winter dinner parties. Then my sister gave me a huge bag of pears from her garden this afternoon and I wasn't sure if I could freeze them or not. Thank you for your freezing tips now I just need to find some interesting recipes for pears!