How to Cook 10 Common Types of Rice

Updated on March 17, 2017
Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

Claudia has been writing recipes online for more than 6 years. She enjoys coming up with unique and tasty dishes, especially sweet treats.

How to Cook 10 Common Types of Rice
How to Cook 10 Common Types of Rice | Source

If you are like my family, you eat rice all the time. It's easy to make, healthy, and is delicious with almost anything.

When I bring a bag of rice home from the store I immediately transfer it to an airtight plastic container for storage. The packaging it come in gets thrown away. Since I've been making some types of rice for many years, I have the instructions memorized. Lately though, I've been trying out other varieties that I'm not so familiar with and, once the original wrapping is gone, I can't remember how to cook them.

As you can see from the directions of the types listed, cooking methods can differ greatly, so I decided to come up with this reference guide to help. It's a lot better than trying to guess what the ratio of water to rice is, and what cooking times should be! Of course, whenever possible, I suggest that you follow the directions that are found on the packaging before consulting this chart.

This list contains 10 common rice varieties and their typical cooking methods. There are thousands of other types around the world.

Just a quick note: Recipes that include rice sometimes require preparations other than those listed here, so it's best to follow the instructions on the recipe.

Did you know?

More than 40,000 varieties of rice are grown in the world.

The oldest grains of rice found are over 15,000 years old.

Except for Antarctica, rice is grown on every continent.

Rice is used to make some alcoholic beverages.

Rice is thought to be a symbol of fertility in some cultures.

Ten well-known types of rice

Name
Arborio
Basmati
Black
Jasmine
Long Grain Brown Rice
Long Grain White Rice
Medium Grain White Rice
Parboiled Rice
Short Grain White Rice
Wild Rice
  • The different varieties are listed below in alphabetical order. You'll find type, origins and uses for each one.You'll also find instructions for the stove top and microwave.
  • If using a rice cooker, consult the instructions it came with.
  • All of the directions provided are for 4 servings. Amounts can be increased or decreased to get desired number of servings.

Cooking Tip

Just because white and brown rice are available in the same varieties, i.e. long grain, don't assume they have the same cooking directions. Brown rice is cooked much longer than white rice.

Arborio Rice

Type: Short-grain. Brown arborio rice is also available, but prepared differently.

Origins: Italy, although now grown in other areas.

Uses: Used primarily for risotto and puddings.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup rice
  • 1 1/2 cup water
  • 1 tbsp butter (optional)

How to cook arborio rice

Stove Top
Microwave
Place rice, water and butter into a saucepan and heat until boiling.
N/A
Cover with lid, reduce heat to low, and simmer for 20 minutes.
 
Keeping lid on, remove from heat and let sit 10 more minutes.
 
Fluff and serve.
 
source: lundberg.com
Basmati rice gives this Afghan Palau recipe a delicious aromatic flavor.
Basmati rice gives this Afghan Palau recipe a delicious aromatic flavor. | Source

Basmati Rice

Type: Aromatic. Brown basmati rice is also available, but prepared differently.

Origin: India/Pakistan, although now grown in other areas.

Uses: Primarily used in main and side dishes.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup basmati rice
  • 1 1/4 cup water
  • Pinch of salt

How to cook basmati rice

Stove Top
Microwave
Rinse and drain rice 2 - 3 times.
Rinse and drain rice 2 - 3 times.
Place rice, water and salt in a saucepan.
Place rice, water and salt in a microwave safe bowl.
Bring to a boil.
Cover tightly with plastic wrap.
Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 10 - 15 minutes.
Cook for 5 - 10 minutes on full power.
Remove from heat and let sit, covered for 5 more minutes.
Remove the plastic wrap and stir. Careful, it's very hot.
Fluff before serving.
Cook for an additional 10 minutes on 50% setting.
 
Remove from microwave and let sit for 5 - 10 minutes.
Source: Royal Basmati Rice

Black Rice

Type: Other

Origins: Asia, but now grown in other areas as well.

Uses: Primarily used in main, side and dessert dishes.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup black rice
  • 2 cups water


How to cook black rice

Stove Top
Microwave
Place rice and water in a saucepan.
N/A
Soak rice in water for 60 minutes before cooking.
 
Bring to a boil after soaking.
 
Cover with a tight lid, reduce heat and simmer for about 30 minutes.
 
Remove from heat, fluff and serve.
 
Source: blackrice.com

Jasmine Rice

Type: Aromatic. Brown jasmine rice is also available, but prepared differently.

Origins: Asia, primarily Thailand, but also grown in other areas.

Uses: Used in main, side, and dessert dishes.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup rice
  • 1 3/4 cup water
  • 1 tbsp butter (optional)

How to cook jasmine rice

Stove Top
Microwave
Place rice, water and butter into a saucepan and heat until boiling.
N/A
Cover with lid, reduce heat to low, and simmer for 40 minutes.
 
Keeping lid on, remove from heat and let sit 10 more minutes.
 
Fluff and serve.
 
Source: lundberg.com

Long Grain Brown Rice

Type: Common. Also available in short and medium grains. Brown rice is rice that is only hulled. The germ and bran remain.

Origins: Asia, but now produced globally.

Uses: Primarily used in main and side dishes.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup brown rice
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 tsp salt (optional)
  • 1 tbsp butter or oil (optional)

How to cook long grain brown rice

Stove Top
Microwave
Place rice, water, butter and salt into a saucepan and heat until boiling.
N/A
Cover with lid, reduce heat to low, and simmer for 50 minutes.
 
Remove from heat and let sit for 5 minutes.
 
Fluff and serve.
 
Source: Giant Eagle
Chicken and rice casserole is the ultimate comfort food.  Long grain white rice is what I like to use when I make casseroles.
Chicken and rice casserole is the ultimate comfort food. Long grain white rice is what I like to use when I make casseroles. | Source

Long Grain White Rice

Type: Common

Origins: Asia, but now produced globally.

Uses: Primarily used in main, side and dessert dishes.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup long grain white rice
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 tsp salt


How to cook long grain white rice

Stove Top
Microwave
Bring water to a boil.
Using a microwave safe covered 2 quart dish, combine water and rice.
Add rice and stir to combine.
Microwave, covered, on high for 5 minutes.
Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 20 minutes.
Reduce power to 50% and microwave, covered, and additional 15 minutes.
Remove from heat, fluff and serve.
While still in the microwave, let the rice sit for about 5 minutes.
 
Remove from microwave, fluff and serve.
Source: Giant Eagle

Medium Grain White Rice

Type: Common

Origins: Asia, but now produced globally.

Uses: Primarily used in main, side dishes and desserts. Also used in sushi.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup medium grain white rice
  • 2 cups water


How to cook medium grain rice

Stove Top
Microwave
Bring water to a boil.
Using a microwave safe covered 2 quart dish, combine water and rice.
Add rice and stir to combine.
Microwave, covered, on high for 5 minutes.
Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer for 20 minutes.
Reduce power to 50% and microwave, covered, an additional 15 minutes.
Remove from heat, fluff and serve.
While still in the microwave, let the rice sit for about 5 minutes.
 
Remove from microwave, fluff and serve.
source: riverrice.com

Parboiled Rice

Type: Parboiled rice is rice that has been partially boiled in it's husk. It is also known as converted rice. This process makes it retain more nutrients and makes it less sticky.

Origins: N/A

Uses: Used in main, side dishes and desserts.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup parboiled rice
  • 2 1/4 cups rice
  • 1/2 tsp salt (optional)
  • 1 tbsp butter/margarine (optional)

How to cook parboiled rice

Stove Top
Microwave
Combine water, rice, salt and butter in a saucepan.
Combine water, rice, salt and butter in a microwave safe bowl.
Bring to a boil.
Bring to a boil, about 2 minutes on high setting of microwave.
Bring heat down to low and simmer, covered, for about 20 minutes.
Cover and continue cooking on 50% power for about 20 minutes.
Remove from heat and let stand for 5 minutes, covered.
Remove from microwave and let it rest, covered for another 5 minutes.
Source: www.producersrice.com

Short Grain White Rice

Type: Common

Origins: Asia, but now produced globally.

Uses: Main, side and dessert dishes. Commonly used for making sushi.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup short grain white rice
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 tbsp butter (optional)
  • 1 tsp salt (optional)

How to cook short grain white rice

Stove Top
Microwave
Rinse rice 2 - 3 times with water.
N/A
Add rice, water, butter and salt to a saucepan with a lid.
 
Bring to boiling, cover and reduce to low heat.
 
Simmer, covered, for about 25 minutes.
 
Remove from heat, fluff and serve.
 
Source: Bob's Red Mill

Wild Rice

Type: Other

Origins: North America, certain varieties from Asia.

Uses: Primarily used in main and side dishes. Also good in soups.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup wild rice
  • 8 cups of water
  • 1/2 tsp butter (optional)

How to cook wild rice

Stove Top
Microwave
Add all ingredients to a saucepan and bring to a boil.
N/A
Bring temperature down to low and simmer for 30 minutes, covered tightly.
 
Turn off the stove and leave the pan on the burner for 30 more minutes, or until it has reached the desired texture.
 
Drain any remaining liquid and serve.
 
source: canoewildrice.com

Other sources

  • web.duke.edu
  • ricefest.com
  • usriceproducers.com

Questions & Answers

    © 2015 Claudia Mitchell

    Comments

      0 of 8192 characters used
      Post Comment

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        22 months ago

        I've never had Forbidden red rice, never heard of it. I'll have to look that up. Interesting.

      • Valene profile image

        Valene 

        22 months ago from Missouri

        I made some Forbidden red rice once and it had such an unusual flavor. I am not really sure how to properly prepare it as I think whatever I did wasn't right.

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        2 years ago

        I like biryani rice too Authenticz. I like the interesting flavor it has and it's really good with certain sauces. Thanks for stopping by.

      • Authenticz profile image

        Authenticz HubPage 

        2 years ago from North America

        I like to eat rice sometimes. But for eating rice you need more cuisines. I cant handle so much cooking. I love biriyani though

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        2 years ago

        Thanks breathing. I think most people like rice and like to try different versions of it.

      • breathing profile image

        Sajib 

        2 years ago from Bangladesh

        Rice is a very good food. Especially in the Indian subcontinent people live on rice. So I love rice very much. But even I was unaware that there is so much variety of rice and their cooking procedure was completely unknown to me. The author has beautifully described all the types and their cooking procedure. So any rice lover can take advice from this post and make own desired type. Also now you have got many different options for different parties. You can amaze them may making these different types of rice. Obviously this will be a great pleasure to amaze them!!

      • Authenticz profile image

        Authenticz HubPage 

        2 years ago from North America

        Glimmer, I like rice too. Last night i ate one kind of brownish rice.

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        2 years ago

        Thanks Authenticz - Rice is one of my favorites and I like all of the variations.

      • Authenticz profile image

        Authenticz HubPage 

        2 years ago from North America

        wow! Awesome!. With simple rice, great innovations.

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        Hi vwriter - You really should give Jasmine and Basmati a try. They definitely taste different than long grain white rice. More flavorful. They also taste different from each other. If you've ever been to an Indian restaurant, you've had basmati rice. Nuttier flavor and different texture too. Enjoy your rice and thanks for stopping by to read and comment!

      • vwriter profile image

        vwriter 

        3 years ago from US

        My hubby and I have been eating more rice as well. I've been tempted to try Jasmine and Basmati because I have seen them in the store. I'm wondering as to the taste. Is it different from white long grain rice.

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        Thanks for reading and commenting vasantha T k. I really appreciate it and am happy you found the article helpful. Have a nice day.

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        Hi Vellur - I agree that brown rice doesn't get as soft, but sometimes that added texture is nice. Glad you enjoyed the article and thanks for reading and commenting.

      • vasantha  T k profile image

        vasantha T k 

        3 years ago from Bangalore

        Good tips given for cooking the different types of rice. Nice.

      • Vellur profile image

        Nithya Venkat 

        3 years ago from Dubai

        Very useful guide on cooking different varieties of rice, thank you for sharing. Brown rice is healthy but it takes so long to cook and it does not get soft enough like white rice! Great hub, voted up.

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        Like you, I am amazed at all of the rice varieties out there. These are just a few of them. Glad you stopped by to check out this article. Have a great day!

      • Anne Harrison profile image

        Anne Harrison 

        3 years ago from Australia

        I'm always amazed when wandering through markets in Asia at the sheer variety of rice available - something we definitely don't have here. Thanks for the instructions, I've often wondered about how to cook both black and wild rice, Anne

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        Hi aviannovice - Nice to hear from you again. We are enjoying more and more rice varieties and it hasn't been that long since I realized there were brown versions of most of these types. It makes dinner a little more interesting. Thanks so much for reading. Our birds are singing loudly and coming back strong after a very cold winter here.

      • aviannovice profile image

        Deb Hirt 

        3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

        I used to eat white rice a lot, but prefer the browns due to their healthfulness. I think I would like to try some of the other varieties, like the Asian rices. Thanks for enlightening us with the proper ways to cook all these different rices.

      • Kristen Howe profile image

        Kristen Howe 

        3 years ago from Northeast Ohio

        Anytime, Glimmer Twin. I would love to try it sometime.

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        Thanks for reading and the vote Kristen! I appreciate it. Jasmine is a really nice aromatic rice. We really like it for a change of pace because it has that subtle flavor.

      • Kristen Howe profile image

        Kristen Howe 

        3 years ago from Northeast Ohio

        Great hub, Glimmer. Some of the rices I had and others I haven't like jasmine rice. Great tips for cooking rice. Voted up for useful!

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        Happy Easter to you too Thelma and thank you for checking out my article on rice. You and I both like all the different types of rice. It's amazing how versatile it is.

      • Thelma Alberts profile image

        Thelma Alberts 

        3 years ago from Germany

        Great hub! I love eating different kinds of rice like the basmati, long grain and jasmine rice. Thanks for sharing this very useful and informative hub. Happy Easter!

      • hiya-writer profile image

        Sudipa 

        3 years ago from India

        Yes, it has a wonderful flavor and is long grained. Glad to know you know about it.

      • hiya-writer profile image

        Sudipa 

        3 years ago from India

        Yes, it has a wonderful flavor and is long grained. Glad to know you know about it.

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        Thank you hiya-writer - I love basmati rice and I believe that is normally served in the Indian restaurants here in the US. My daughter likes to eat rice for breakfast too. I appreciate your kind comments. Have a nice day!

      • hiya-writer profile image

        Sudipa 

        3 years ago from India

        Rice is the staple food in India. In fact I have rice twice in a day, which might be surprising for many, but that's what we have followed since childhood. Medium grain white rice is my favorite. Very well written informative article.

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        I like white rice too peachpurple. It's the one we eat the most here. Thanks for reading and commenting.

      • peachpurple profile image

        peachy 

        3 years ago from Home Sweet Home

        i prefer plain white rice, easy to cook and cheaper than brown rice.

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        I appreciate it Audrey! Thanks so much for your kind comments and for sharing. Now I just need to come up with some more rice recipes!

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        Hi prestonandkate - Glad you enjoyed the list. Thanks for stopping by!

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        Oh RTalloni - That sounds really good. Does the lime juice add a nice zing to it and is the texture the same? My daughter would go wild about that. Thanks for the tip!

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        Oh RTalloni - That sounds really good. Does the lime juice add a nice zing to it and is the texture the same? My daughter would go wild about that. Thanks for the tip!

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        kschimmel - We have 4, but our brown rice is almost out. You are right, it is so versatile and easy to cook. Thanks for reading and commenting. Enjoy your day!

      • vocalcoach profile image

        Audrey Hunt 

        3 years ago from Idyllwild Ca.

        What a marvelous hub about rice! You've done an outstanding job. Thanks so much and will share.

      • prestonandkate profile image

        Preston and Kate 

        3 years ago from the Midwest

        Great resource!

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        Hi Rose - I'm glad you liked it! Thanks for reading. We had rice as a side for dinner tonight and it was the type I had already memorized. :-) Enjoy the rest of your weekend!

      • RTalloni profile image

        RTalloni 

        3 years ago from the short journey

        Very useful--thanks for the information and tips. Just this week I cooked 2 cups of jasmine and replaced 1/4 cup of the water with lime juice to use in a Mexican meal. I'll be doing it again!

      • kschimmel profile image

        Kimberly Schimmel 

        3 years ago from North Carolina, USA

        Great info! I have at least three kinds of rice in my pantry right now. So versatile!

      • randomcreative profile image

        Rose Clearfield 

        3 years ago from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

        Thanks for putting together this fabulous resource!

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        Good morning Bill. Thanks for reading. I knew there were a number of types of rice, but definitely not thousands! We eat rice all the time in our house and when our dogs have tummy troubles they get it too. I appreciate you stopping by and hope you are planning a fun vacation for the upcoming summer!

      • bdegiulio profile image

        Bill De Giulio 

        3 years ago from Massachusetts

        Hi Glimmer. Great information. I had no idea there were so many different types of rice. We eat rice often and our shih tzu loves rice and chicken treats. Great job. Have a great weekend.

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        Thanks so much Larry. I'm glad you enjoyed the hub and I appreciate you stopping by. After all these nice comments I think I feel like making rice for dinner tonight.

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        I like cooking my rice on the stovetop poetryman, but some rice can be cooked in the microwave. I will say I don't think it tastes as good and sometime the texture isn't the best when using the microwave. I do appreciate your kind comments and vote. Thanks so much!

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        Nice to see you breakfastpop. I really came up with this idea because I always toss my rice packaging and kept forgetting how to cook it. Glad you enjoyed the hub and thanks for reading and commenting.

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        Thanks for stopping by Bill. I haven't written in a while so it's nice to see old friends. I had no idea chickens eat rice. I know chicken is really good with rice (apologies to your chicken friends). I appreciate your kind comments and keep cooking rice! It's the best.

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        pstraubie - I knew there were a number of different types, but not as many as I came across when researching this hub. I only highlighted the more common ones. My family really likes rice so it's fun to change it up a bit with the different varieties. Many thanks for the angels and for the share and votes! Have a great day!

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile imageAUTHOR

        Claudia Mitchell 

        3 years ago

        Hi purl3agony - Brown rice is yummy and my daughter really likes it which is good because she is a very choosy eater. It has a nice nutty flavor. I like to jazz up some dinners with the aromatic rices. It's amazing how different they taste. Thanks so much for reading and pinning!

      • Larry Rankin profile image

        Larry Rankin 

        3 years ago from Oklahoma

        Love rice. There are so many. Great read!

      • poetryman6969 profile image

        poetryman6969 

        3 years ago

        Very detailed, very interesting article. I did not know that any kind of rice could be cooked in a microwave.

        Voted up.

      • profile image

        Breakfastpop 

        3 years ago

        I appreciate this info. I love rice, so now I have the perfect cooking guide. Up and useful.

      • billybuc profile image

        Bill Holland 

        3 years ago from Olympia, WA

        This is just about everything a person could want to know about rice, all rolled up in a neat, tidy online cookbook....and it's free. Thanks for the great tips. We eat a ton of rice around here, and, a little known fact, chickens love rice as well. :)

      • pstraubie48 profile image

        Patricia Scott 

        3 years ago from sunny Florida

        Thanks for the heads up, Glimmer. I had NO idea there were so many kinds of rice. Black rice? Who knew?

        Now of course I have to go in search of these and give them a try.

        Awesome as usual.

        Pinned to Awesome HubPages Voted up++++ and shared

        Please know that Angels are on the way to you this morning ps

      • purl3agony profile image

        Donna Herron 

        3 years ago from USA

        Wonderful! My husband is on a brown rice kick, and wants to try other rices too. This hub is perfectly timed for us. Pinning so hubby can decide what he wants to try next :)

      working

      This website uses cookies

      As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, delishably.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

      For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://delishably.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

      Show Details
      Necessary
      HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
      LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
      Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
      AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
      Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
      CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
      Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
      Features
      Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
      Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
      Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
      Marketing
      Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
      Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
      Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
      Statistics
      Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
      ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)