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Leftover Christmas Pudding Recipe Ideas

Gordon loves cooking and experimenting with food. He loves making new dishes, particularly with unusual or underused ingredients.

Mini cheesecake made with leftover Christmas pudding and served with pineapple cream

Mini cheesecake made with leftover Christmas pudding and served with pineapple cream

What Is Christmas Pudding?

Christmas pudding is a rich British dessert traditionally served on or around Christmas Day. It is also known as plum pudding or simply Christmas pud. It is made from dried fruits, suet, molasses (treacle), a variety of spices, flour, eggs, sugar, a number of other optional ingredients and usually some form of alcohol. It is traditional to make the Christmas pudding well in advance of the big day and allow it to age. The alcohol it contains prevents it from spoiling. The pudding can be served with brandy butter or cream, custard, or even plain pouring cream.

Christmas pudding served simply with rum sauce

Christmas pudding served simply with rum sauce

What Can I Do With Leftover Christmas Pudding?

Christmas pudding is naturally served as the final course of what is likely an extremely hearty meal, so the likelihood of leftovers is fairly high—especially when a fairly large pudding has been prepared. While the pudding can later be eaten cold or carefully reheated using a method which won't dry it out, you may want to make something just a little bit different with your leftover pud on Boxing Day (the day after Christmas in the UK). This page is dedicated to exploring those options.

Christmas Pudding Mince Pies with Icing

Christmas pudding filled puff pastry fies are topped with icing

Christmas pudding filled puff pastry fies are topped with icing

Mince pies (or mincemeat pies) are surely as big a part of Christmas in the UK as Christmas pudding. What better way therefore to start off the recipes on this page by adapting the mince pie concept to make them with Christmas pud rather than mincemeat? The icing on the top is of course entirely optional.

Cook Time

Prep time: 15 min (plus few hours' cooling/setting time)

Cook time: 30 min

Ready in: 4 to 6 hours

Yields: 2 pies

Ingredients

  • 4 ounces puff pastry
  • Flour for rolling
  • 1 tablespoon Christmas pudding
  • Butter for greasing ramekins
  • Beaten egg for glazing pastry
  • 1 tablesppon icing/confectioner's sugar
  • Small mint sprigs to garnish (optional)

Before you start the prep for this dish, you need to know the measurements of your ramekins in order to cut the cases and lids to the right diameter. These ramekins were 3" in diameter and 1" deep. This means that the cases have to be at least 5" in diameter (1 x diameter plus 2 x depth) but for this recipe, they were cut to 6" to provide a rim round the finished pies for icing. The lids were cut to 3" diameter. Handy kitchen tools (a bowl and a drinking glass) of the right diameter were used as templates.

  1. Lightly butter a couple of ramekins all over the inside.
  2. Put the Christmas pudding into a microwaveable bowl and add about a teaspoon of water. Heat for thirty seconds. Stir well and leave to cool slightly while you prepare the pie cases.
  3. Roll out the pastry and use your chosen template to cut the circle for the pie cases. Carefully fit them in to the ramekins, very gently only pressing them against the sides. Make sure you have an overhanging rim of even height all the way round.
  4. Spoon in the Christmas pudding to almost but not quite fill the ramekins. Very gently compact but be aware that if you pack it too tightly, you may have trouble removing the pies intact from the ramekins after they are cooked.
  5. Cut out the lids for your pies and carefully lay them in place. You should have an enclosed space around half an inch deep at the top of each pie where the icing will ultimately go.
  6. Glaze the lids and extended rims of the pies with beaten egg and cut a small steam vent in the top of each with the point of a sharp knife.
  7. Preheat your oven to 400F/200C/Gas Mark 6 and cook the pies on a baking tray for about 25 to 30 minutes until the pastry is golden. Remove from the oven and leave to sit in the ramekins for 15 minutes.
  8. Carefully (remember they will still be very hot) tip the pies out of the ramekins and sit them on a wire rack to cool completely.
  9. Spoon the icing/confectioner's sugar in to a bowl. Slowly add cold water, whisking with a fork, until you have a thick icing paste.
  10. Use a teaspoon and a knife to fill and smooth out the icing in to the tops of the pies. Add a little sprig of mint to each and put them in the fridge for at least a couple of hours to set the icing.

Christmas Pudding Pancakes with Stewed Plums

Stewed plums are spooned over Christmas pudding and topped with clotted cream

Stewed plums are spooned over Christmas pudding and topped with clotted cream

As previously mentioned, plums are an important ingredient in traditional Christmas pudding recipes though are not necessarily always included in modern times. This dish sees the stewed plums deliberately made slightly tart that their flavour cuts through the sweetness of the pancakes.

Cook Time

Prep time: 30 min

Cook time: 30 min

Ready in: 1 hour

Yields: 4 servings of 3 pancakes each

Ingredients

  • 5 or 6 large, ripe plums, stoned and roughly chopped
  • 2 tablespoons cold water
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • ½ teaspoon ground ginger
  • 4 ounces self-raising/rising flour
  • 4 fluid ounces (¼ US pint) full cream milk
  • 1 egg
  • 2 ounces sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 tablespoon Christmas pudding
  • Little bit of oil for frying
  • Clotted cream to serve
  1. Put the plums in to a saucepan with the water, teaspoon of sugar and ginger and bring the water to a gentle simmer, stirring frequently.
  2. After about 5 to 7 minutes, the water should have evaporated and the plums will be starting to cook down. Turn off the heat, cover and leave to cool.
  3. Put the Christmas pudding in to a bowl with about a teaspoon of water and microwave for 30 seconds. Stir and set aside to cool.
  4. Put the flour in to a bowl with the two ounces of sugar and the salt.
  5. Beat the egg in the milk just until combined and pour in to the flour mix. Stir to form a smooth batter.
  6. Add the Christmas pudding to the batter and stir to combine.
  7. Lightly grease a non-stick frying pan with oil and bring up to a medium heat.
  8. These pancakes each consisted of a tablespoon of batter and were cooked two at a time. Don't overload the pan. Carefully drop the batter in to the pan that it forms circles around 3" in diameter.
  9. After a couple of minutes, you will see bubbles starting to form on top of the pancakes. When the bubbles start to form, this is when the pancakes should carefully be turned with a spatula to fry for a similar period on the second side.
  10. Lift the cooked pancakes to a wire rack. They can be eaten hot or cold.
  11. Plate three pancakes per person, spoon on some stewed plums and top with clotted cream.

Bargain Christmas Puddings

Christmas puddings drastically reduced in price

Christmas puddings drastically reduced in price

It is not only with leftover Christmas pudding that the recipes on this page can be prepared. They can also be prepared equally well with Christmas pudding taken straight from a supermarket pack (Note that such puddings will of course have been previously cooked). Very often, in the weeks or even months following Christmas, supermarkets will drastically reduce the price of Christmas puddings in order to clear them from the shelves to make way for new season produce. In the photo above, the original price is unknown but these perfectly good puddings had firstly been reduced to 48p (circa 75 US cents) and subsequently to 19p (circa 30 US cents). A real bargain? Absolutely!

Remember, the alcohol in Christmas puddings ensures they have a far longer shelf life than you may imagine (up to several months). This means that they can also often be bought fairly cheaply and out of season on sites such as Amazon.

Plastic wrap covers unused Christmas pudding for refrigerating

Plastic wrap covers unused Christmas pudding for refrigerating

If you are using Christmas pudding straight from the supermarket packaging but aren't using it all at once, it can very effectively be stored in the fridge for up to three days (though do refer to individual packs for confirmation). Simply cover the dish with some plastic wrap.

Chocolate Corn Flakes Christmas Pudding Cakes

Chocolate corn flake cups are filled with Christmas pudding and topped with fresh cream

Chocolate corn flake cups are filled with Christmas pudding and topped with fresh cream

Cook Time

Prep time: 10 min (plus several hours' setting time)

Cook time: 2 min

Ready in: Few hours or overnight

Yields: 2 cakes

Ingredients

  • 8 small squares cooking chocolate (plus extra 1 for grating to garnish)
  • 2 or 3 small handfuls of cornflakes (as required)
  • 1 tablespoon Christmas pudding
  • 2 or 3 tablespoons whipping cream

Note that if you are buying the cornflakes and chocolate specifically for preparing this recipe, there is no need to buy brand names or expensive cooking chocolate. Supermarket cornflakes and a chocolate flavoured coating (at less than half the price) were used in this instance.

  1. Break the chocolate in to a heatproof bowl and suspend the bowl over a shallow pot of simmering water. Make sure the bowl does not actually touch the water or your chocolate will split. Stir frequently with a wooden spoon.
  2. When the chocolate is almost but not quite completely melted, lift the bowl away from the heat and allow the residual heat to complete the process. This is again to guard against the chocolate splitting.
  3. Take small handfuls of cornflakes and crumble them in to the chocolate, stirring well each time. Continue until the liquid chcolate is all used up and all the cornflake crumbs are coated.
  4. Line two small ramekins with clingfilm. This makes your job much easier later on. Spoon the chocolate cornflakes in to the ramekins and shape in to cups, with the mix coming up to the top of the ramekins at the edge but curving down towards the centre all around.
  5. Put the ramekins in to the fridge for at least a couple of hours to set the cups.
  1. Heat the Christmas pudding in the microwave with a teaspoon or so of water. Stir well and leave for five minutes to cool.
  2. Spoon the Christmas pudding in to the ramekins just to fill the cups. Refrigerate for a further hour.
  3. Carefully pull the cups from the ramekins by scrunching up the clingfilm all around. Peel off the clingfilm, sit the cups on plates and cover to let them reach room temperature. Half an hour should be fine.
  4. Whip the cream and spoon on top of the cakes, garnishing with a little bit of grated chocolate.

Christmas Pudding Cream Tea Scones

Cornish style Christmas pudding cream tea scones

Cornish style Christmas pudding cream tea scones

Cream tea is a long standing English tradition, especially in the south-westernmost counties of Devon and Cornwall. Conventional cream tea will see scones topped with jam and then cream in Cornwall or cream and then jam in Devon.

This simple adaptation of the cream tea concept sees the jam substituted by Christmas pudding. The pudding was microwave heated for thirty seconds with a teaspoon of water before being allowed to cool for a few minutes. It was then used as would be the jam.

Devonshire style Christmas pudding cream tea scones

Devonshire style Christmas pudding cream tea scones

Mini Christmas Pudding Cheesecakes with Pineapple Cream

Mini Christmas pudding cheesecake served with pineapple fresh cream

Mini Christmas pudding cheesecake served with pineapple fresh cream

Cook Time

Prep time: 10 min (plus minimum 3 hours setting time)

Cook time: 2 min

Ready in: 3 hours approximately

Yields: 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 ounces (½ stick) unsalted butter
  • 4 tablespoons digestive biscuit crumbs (Graham crackers are excellent substitute in US)
  • 2 tablespoons Christmas pudding
  • 2 tablespoons cream cheese
  • 4 pineapple rings - 2 finely chopped for cream cheese topping; 2 roughly chopped for pineapple cream
  • 4 to 6 tablespoons whipping cream
  • 1 tablespoon grated chocolate to garnish
  1. Put the butter in to a saucepan and very gently melt. When almost done, remove from the eat and gently swirl to complete process.
  2. Add the biscuit crumb in stages, stirring with a wooden spoon until a still moist, workable crumb base is formed.
  3. Line four ramekins with clingfilm and spoon in enough crumb mixture to one-third fill when it is moderately firmly compressed with the back of a teaspoon. Place in the fridge for an hour.
  4. Heat the Christmas pud in the microwave with a couple of teaspoons of water and stir.
  5. Spoon the pudding in to the ramekins on top of the set crumb base and lightly press down that the ramekins are now two-thirds full. Refrigerate for a further hour.
  1. Spoon the cream cheese in to a bowl. Squeeze as much juice out of the pineapple as possible in your hand before adding to the bowl. Stir to combine.
  2. Spoon the cheese and pineapple on to the Christmas puddings to fill the ramekins. Smooth level with a knife and put back in to the fridge for a final hour.
  3. Carefully remove the cheesecakes from the ramekins to a chopping board. Scatter with the grated chocolate. Cover and leave for 30 minutes to reach room temperature.
  4. Put the pineapple pieces in to a food processor/blender and spoon in the whipping cream. Blitz to form a thick, smooth cream.
  5. Spoon some cream on to each of four serving plates and slide the spoon to form a "tail" garnish.
  6. Lift a cheesecake on to each plate to serve.

Quick and Easy Breakfast Idea: Christmas Pudding Croissants

Croissants are slit open, buttered and stuffed with Christmas pudding

Croissants are slit open, buttered and stuffed with Christmas pudding

Christmas pudding for breakfast on Boxing Day? It's probably not something which automatically springs to mind but this simple idea worked very well and is an excellent way of using up what is perhaps just a small amount of leftover pud.

Cook Time

Prep time: 5 min

Cook time: 10 min (or per pack heating instructions)

Ready in: 15 min

Yields: 2 servings of 2 croissants each

Ingredients

  • 4 croissants
  • Butter
  • 1 tablespoon Christmas pudding
  1. Heat the croissants in a moderate oven.
  2. Heat the Christmas pud in the microwave with a teaspoon of water, stir and allow a minute or two to cool slightly.
  3. Carefully cut a slit in the centre of each hot croissant, following the shape, to around half the depth.
  4. Add a little butter to each croissant slit and allow a minute to melt.
  5. Spoon the Christmas pud in to the slits in the croissants and enjoy.

And Now for Something Completely Different . . .

This next suggestion for serving leftover Christmas pudding is best perhaps introduced correctly if it is not to seem absolutely outlandish and yes, possibly even repugnant. The idea came from a rich fruit pudding/cake (not entirely dissimilar to Christmas pudding) commonly made in Scotland called a clootie dumpling. While dumpling is most often sliced, served and eaten by hand like many other types of cake, it is not unheard of for a slice to be fried up and served as part of a breakfast or all day fry-up with sausages, bacon and other traditional ingredients. Likewise, less substantial fruit pudding slices are often sold in breakfast packs with sliced sausage and black pudding.

Bearing the above in mind, the following serving suggestion seemed a natural progression/ justified experiment...and yes, it was absolutely delicious.

Leftover Christmas Pudding with Sausage, Bacon and Egg

Reheated Chrsitmas pudding is served for breakfast with the more traditional sausage, bacon and egg

Reheated Chrsitmas pudding is served for breakfast with the more traditional sausage, bacon and egg

Cook Time

Prep time: 5 min

Cook time: 20 min

Ready in: 25 min

Yields: 1 serving

Ingredients

  • 4 beef link sausages
  • Vegetable oil for frying
  • 2 slices of middle bacon (or 3 rashers of back bacon)
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon Christmas pudding
  1. Add a little oil to a large, non-stick frying pan and lay in the suasges only. Do not prick the sausages - they should be cooked for gently for 15 to 20 minutes until done, turning them frequently, and they should not burst.
  2. When the sausages are ready, lift to a heated plate and cover with foil to keep warm.
  3. Rub a smaller non-stick pan with a little oil just to great a film and bring up to a fairly high heat.
  4. Break your egg in to a small bowl before carefully pouring in to the centre of the pan. Wait around thirty seconds until the egg is starting to set then reduce the heat to low to medium. Fry for 3 or 4 minutes until white is set all around the yolk.
  5. As soon as the egg is in the pan, fry the bacon in the pan vacated by the sausages for a couple of minutes each side.
  6. Heat up the Christmas pudding in the microwave and allow to sit for a minute while the remainder of the meal is plated.
  7. Lay the sausages on a serving plate and the bacon alongside. Lift the egg on to the bacon.
  8. Spoon the Christmas pudding on to the plate and serve immediately.

How to Make the Most of Leftovers

As with leftovers of any type, getting the most out of Christmas pudding leftovers is above all about thinking laterally, or slightly out of the box. By simply thinking about what sweet dishes you generally enjoy, you should very easily be able to come up with your own ideas for ensuring that no Christmas pudding need simply be reheated and eaten again as is - or even worse, go to waste.

© 2014 Gordon Hamilton

Comments

Gordon Hamilton (author) from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom on October 01, 2015:

Glad these ideas appeal to you Elsie and thanks for letting me know. Yes, brandy sauce is of course also very popular here and definitely adds a little extra something to the traditional seasonal pud.

Elsie Hagley from New Zealand on September 21, 2015:

Excellent article. I love my Christmas pudding, I have brandy sauce with mine. Always eat the leftovers the next day, sometimes heat in microwave or even eat cold with a little butter on it with a cup of tea, but have never tried the ideas you have here for using the leftovers, will certainly be trying them this Christmas.

Thanks.

Gordon Hamilton (author) from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom on September 03, 2014:

I'm pleased you're familiar with it, Dr Smith. It's unfamiliar to many outwith the UK of course but definitely worth an experiment or two for food lovers...

William Leverne Smith from Hollister, MO on August 31, 2014:

What fun! Love to see new Christmas Pudding ideas. Thanks for sharing!! ;-)

Gordon Hamilton (author) from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom on May 22, 2014:

Thanks, randomcreative. I'm gald you like the variety. I know the savoury dish will seem a little bit strange to some! :)

I hope you found something tasty and interesting, amymurry - thanks for visiting and commenting

Amy Murry from London on May 20, 2014:

Ohh wow! only looking at the pics and i'm drooling..

to bad i'm too lazy to actually cook something, i'll just go and buy something from the neighborhood's bakery

Rose Clearfield from Milwaukee, Wisconsin on May 19, 2014:

All of the little pies and cakes are so cute! As always, great range of options here. I like that you've included both savory and sweet dishes.

Gordon Hamilton (author) from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom on May 18, 2014:

Special delivery for you, Nell ;)

Nell Rose from England on May 18, 2014:

Thanks Gordon, so the cheesecake is on the way? LOL!

Gordon Hamilton (author) from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom on May 18, 2014:

Well if I could I would transport you a cheesecake right now, Nell :) I know what you mean about the lack of leftovers - common issue. This is a "just in case" Hub... Thanks for reading and commenting :)

Nell Rose from England on May 18, 2014:

Well thats different! lol! I want the cheesecake, and I want it now! I will pass on the breakfast one though! great idea Gordon! We tend to pig out at Christmas and never have any left, but if we had I would definitely try these!

Gordon Hamilton (author) from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom on May 18, 2014:

Bethperry, thanks for visiting and commenting - I hope your kids do get a chance to try the cornflakes cakes, be that with or without the Christmas pud! ;)

Blond Logic thank you so much for the extensive comment and I'm really glad I could help you out in not just one but several ways. The wee pies really work great in this way - I wish I could remember from where I got the idea but I'm afraid I can't. Sometimes, things just come in to my head...

The pancakes are a funny thing. We call these pancakes in Scotland but I believe they are often called drop scones in England and the rest of the UK. What your husband calls pancakes, I would also call crepes or French pancakes.

I'm especially glad you like the fry up idea. I know how mad it must sound to so many people but it really is a winner, I promise :)

Thanks, Abdullah-Al-ezzo - best regards to you, too

Abdullah-Al-ezzo on May 18, 2014:

It looks very tasty ,, great work bro

My Best Regards,

Mary Wickison from Brazil on May 18, 2014:

I loved it. Not only did I never have any leftover, I bought extra to have in June, 6 months after. I love Christmas pud.

Your hub has helped me in other ways though. I wanted to buy a small pan for tarts but I love the idea of using the ramekin, so thanks for the info on how to do a crust for that.

Secondly, you have solved another issue we have here. Your pancakes are what I call pancakes. My husband makes crepes and calls them pancakes.

Thirdly, I love the idea to eat it with a breakfast fry up. I'll bet that is gorgeous.

All of it looks wonderful.

Beth Perry from Tennesee on May 18, 2014:

What creative ideas! I think my kids would particularly like the corn flakes cakes.

Gordon Hamilton (author) from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom on May 17, 2014:

Thanks and I'm glad you like the ideas, grand old lady, even though (as I'm sure many others will be) you are unfamiliar with the actual pudding. It is very different from bread pudding so I hope you get the chance to give it a try some time.

Mona Sabalones Gonzalez from Philippines on May 17, 2014:

You've given a large selection of dishes to use to upcycle leftover pudding, and they all sound delicious. Although unfamiliar with pudding, I do love bread pudding. Looks like it's time to get interested in this so that I can follow some of your upcycled recipes as well. I particularly love the pancakes with the stewed plums.