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Easy Stir-Fried Pepper Beef With Bok Choy Recipe (Mongolian Beef)

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I love cooking stir-fries. They're so quick and so delicious. What's not to love?

Stir-Fried Pepper Beef With Bok Choy

Stir-Fried Pepper Beef With Bok Choy

Pepper beef with bok choy is one of my favourite stir-fry recipes. It is so simple, yet so delicious. Surprisingly, the simple seasonings—salt, pepper and soya—in this dish really bring out the flavour of beef. This recipe is also often called Mongolian Beef.

Bok choy is Chinese white cabbage, which is sold both as a mature vegetable and young "baby" ones, which I prefer. Crunchy in texture and slightly bitter in taste, it has a thick white stem bordered by dark green leaves. If bok choy is not available, substitute Napa cabbage, Savoy cabbage or young kale.

Many Chinese stir-fry recipes are cooked quickly, so ingredients need to be prepared in advance. I recommend having all the ingredients for this recipe chopped or sliced before you begin to cook.

Cook Time

Prep timeCook timeReady inYields

15 min

25 min

40 min

4 Servings (~440 Calories Each)

Beef Marinade Ingredients

  • 1 cup white wine
  • 1 pound sirloin beef, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Sauce Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
  • 1 onion, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 cup beef stock
  • 1 tablespoon dark soya sauce
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch dissolved in 4 tablespoons water
  • 3 cups chopped bok choy
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. In a large glass or ceramic bowl, combine white wine and beef; stir to coat. Add cornstarch, salt and pepper; mix well. Chill for 30 minutes.
  2. With a slotted spoon, remove meat from the marinade. Set liquid aside.
  3. In a nonstick wok or skillet, heat 1 tablespoon oil over high heat for 45 seconds. Add beef; stir-fry until it begins to brown and no red is visible, about 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer to warm plate. Set aside.
  4. Return pan to high heat. Add remaining 1 tablespoon oil and heat for 30 seconds. Add onion and garlic; stir fry until onion begins to soften. Add beef stock and soya sauce; bring to a boil, stirring to thicken. Add bok choy and stir until then just begin to wilt. Return beef to pan and stir to heat through, about 2 mins.
  5. Transfer to a warm platter and serve immediately (with steamed rice).

Note: I like to serve this dish on top of cooked white rice, but remember that this will add calories to your meal.

Calories in Cooked White Rice:

  • 1 cup short-grain white rice: approx 267 calories
  • 1 cup medium-grain white rice: approx 242 calories
  • 1 cup long-grain white rice: approx 205 calories

Helpful Tips for Making Good Stir-Fries

Let me give you some tips and explain some terms in Chinese cooking. This will help you prepare better stir-fries!

How to Slice Meat

Meat is often sliced across the grain. In addition to ensuring that it takes little time to cook, this also maximizes tenderness.

How to Mince

When herbs or seasonings are described as minced, in this case the recipe calls for minced garlic, this usually means that the item is cut into thin slices then chopped until a coarse meal is obtained. This ensures that the ingredient releases its flavours faster during cooking.

Dark Soya Sauce

This recipe calls for dark soya sauce. There are many brands of soya sauce, so I suggest you experiment with soya sauces to find a brand that suits your taste. Soya sauce keeps indefinitely, even when stored at room temperature. Now, there are three kinds of soya sauce:

  • Light soya sauce is the least aged and the one most often used in cooking. So whenever a recipe calls for soya sauce, this is the one to use.
  • Dark soya sauce, slightly thicker and longer-aged than the lighter version, is preferred for dipping and braising.
  • Sweet soya sauce is made from fermenting soybean and sugar cane. This is more difficult to find so if a recipe calls for sweet soya sauce, I will include a recipe for substitute.

Bok Choy

Bok choy is Chinese white cabbage, which is sold both as a mature vegetable and young "baby" ones, which I prefer. Crunchy in texture and slightly bitter in taste, it has a thick white stem bordered by dark green leaves. If bok choy is not available, substitute Napa cabbage, Savoy cabbage or young kale.

Sui Choy

Sui choy is Chinese green cabbage, which is often called Napa cabbage in North America. The mildly flavored leaves, which when barely wilted, are excellent in soups or lightly stir-fried. Finely sliced green or Savoy cabbage make good substitutes.

Cooked Rice (Optional)

Most Chinese food are eaten with rice, but rice adds calorie to your meal. If you are counting calories, do not include rice.

Enjoy!

© 2011 Beebie Lee

Comments

Alyssa on March 12, 2012:

Hi, I have a couple questions about this recipe: Once the marinade liquid is set aside, does it get put into the sauce? Also, when is the cornstarch added to the beef stock and soya? Looking forward to trying this out!

Eiddwen from Wales on February 05, 2011:

Mmmmm Delicious Rosie and well done

Take care

Eiddwen

Beebie Lee (author) from London, Ontario, Canada on February 02, 2011:

thanks Rosie. Try it, if you like Chinese food, you'll like this one.

Rosie Rose from Toronto, Canada on January 31, 2011:

Hiya beebs, omg this looks sooo delicious! thanks for sharing and the tips.

Have a nice day,

Rosie