Russian Dressed Herring Salad "Shuba" ("Cеледка под шубой")

Updated on November 18, 2015
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Lana is a spiritual writer, blogger, and editor who advocates for women to regain their divine power, starting with a family structure.

Dressed Herring, or Herring Under a Fur Coat, is one of the most popular Russian holiday dishes.
Dressed Herring, or Herring Under a Fur Coat, is one of the most popular Russian holiday dishes.
5 stars from 1 rating of Russian salad "Shuba"

Russians love to celebrate in a grand, almost carnivalesque manner, and New Year's is the biggest holiday of the year.

Every December 31 my mom (and millions of other Russian moms) would cook an entire legion of hearty super-delicious dishes meant to not only feed but AMAZE guests and family. Shuba (or seledka pod shuboĭ in Russian) was the crowning glory of the table.

This is my favorite dish in the whole world, and I learned to cook it when I was around 11 years old. That's how easy Shuba is - even a child can make it. The preparation steps are numerous, yes, but they're not complicated. It's basically a lot of shredded veggies smeared with mayo and arranged like a layered cake.

And another thing...about the herring. I realize that most Americans would not find the taste of pickled herring appealing. It's an acquired taste - like coffee or alcohol. But I still encourage you to try Shuba because the taste of herring is very diluted by other ingredients, and it's the combination of all the nuances that makes Shuba taste so great. Ask any Russian!

The biggest problem with pickled fish - it smells like pickled fish.

Herring may look unappetizing, but it's actually very good in this Russian salad setting.
Herring may look unappetizing, but it's actually very good in this Russian salad setting. | Source

Cook Time

Prep time: 2 hours
Cook time: 30 min
Ready in: 2 hours 30 min
Yields: 10-12 servings

Ingredients

  • 4 large fillets of pickled herring in oil, de-boned and chopped into small pieces
  • 6-7 eggs, hard boiled and shredded
  • 7 medium potatoes, boiled, peeled and shredded
  • 5-6 large carrots, boiled, peeled and shredded
  • 3 large beets, boiled, peeled and shredded
  • 1 yellow onion, finely chopped
  • 2 cups of lite or fat free mayonnaise, and it'll be easier if the mayo is more uncongealed than dense
  • parsley, for decoration (optional)

Step 1: Boil the veggies

First step is boiling the vegetables (beets, carrots, potatoes) and the eggs.

You can boil potatoes and carrots in the same large pot, but they do take different preparation times. The carrots will take about 15-20 minutes, potatoes - about 40 minutes.

Boil beets in a separate pot because they tend to color everything they touch deep magenta. They take about an 1-1,5 hours to cook, or until they become tender enough for the knife to slide into them easily.

The eggs take about 10 minutes to cook, after which place them in cold water - it'll make them easy to peel.

When the veggies are ready, let them cool off.

Step 2: Chop the Herring and the Onion Into Small Pieces

While the veggies are cooling off, prepare the herring and the onion.

I remember when herring was a slippery stinky fish that took forever to clean, de-gut and de-bone. Nowadays herring fillets are sold in jars of oil, having very few bones and no skin. So all you have to do is chop the fillets into small pieces, and make sure to do it on a special fish board, the herring is still very smelly!

Step 3: Peel and Shred the Veggies and the Eggs

Peeled vegetables are ready to get shredded.
Peeled vegetables are ready to get shredded.

When the vegetables are cool enough, peel them, shred them and place them onto separate plates. The same goes for the eggs - peel them, shred them, but save 1 yolk for decoration (optional).

At this point you should have 5 or 6 plates in front of you with chopped herring, chopped onion, shredded eggs, potatoes, carrots and beets.

Vegetables and eggs are shredded and placed on separate plates.
Vegetables and eggs are shredded and placed on separate plates.

Now you need a jar of mayo and a deep salad bowl. I know it seems like a lot of mayo but trust me - dry Shuba is no good. Mayo is the glue that holds Shuba together and makes it moist and tangy, especially after letting it sit in a fridge overnight.

Congratulations! You're ready to begin assembling your Dressed Herring masterpiece.

Step 4: Assembly

Layer of potatoes on the bottom, then herring, then onions. Every layer is smeared with mayo. Tip: use the herring sparingly! You don't want it to overpower the dish.
Layer of potatoes on the bottom, then herring, then onions. Every layer is smeared with mayo. Tip: use the herring sparingly! You don't want it to overpower the dish.

The order of the ingredients may vary from cook to cook; I do it the way my mom taught me. I think there's really no wrong way since it all blends in together in the end but I prefer this order of layers:

potatoes on the bottom, mayo, herring and onions, mayo, eggs, mayo, carrots, mayo, beets, mayo, potatoes again, mayo, and so on in the same order, so the top layer is beets.

Basically, every ingredient is layered twice and you have a layer of beets on top, which will turn a pretty pink color once you put mayo on it. The potatoes will probably be the thickest layer. Herring and onions, because of their intense taste, should be layered thinly, more like sprinkled.

Tip: before smearing the mayo, smooth down the veggies with the back of the spoon. This way the mayo will go on more evenly, and you won't need as much of it. The egg layer will be the hardest to apply the mayo to because hard boiled eggs are fluffy when shredded, so they will stick to the spoon. Just do the best you can.

The great thing about Shuba is - it doesn't have to be perfect. It'll still look (and taste!) great.

Every ingredient is layered twice and you have a pretty pinkish layer of beets on top.
Every ingredient is layered twice and you have a pretty pinkish layer of beets on top.

Step 5: Decoration

This step is optional - but I like it. Take that boiled yolk you set aside and crumble it over the top of your Shuba. Little yellow pieces look good against the pink canvas.

Now garnish with parsley and refrigerate overnight. Refrigeration for at least a few hours in crucial so the mayo can soak through the layers and work its magic. Enjoy!

I always make enough Shuba to feed an army.
I always make enough Shuba to feed an army.

Still Confused? Here's the Video Recipe for Dressed Herring

The Healthiest Way To Make "Shuba"

"Shuba" is mostly a vegetable salad, so it's loaded with vitamins A and C, Calcium and Iron. But there are ways to make it even healthier.

  • Buy organic! Root vegetables like beets, potatoes and carrots are some of the most vulnerable to chemical contaminants in the soil. Do yourself and your family a favor - spend a few extra bucks on organic food and save thousands of dollars on medical bills.
  • Use lite or non-fat mayo since we're using a lot of it. Tastes the same, saves the calories.
  • Steam your veggies or boil them in skin - it helps to keep the vitamins intact.
  • Never cook when you're in a bad mood. Put your favorite music on, dance as you move, sing along - do whatever makes you feel good while you cook, and your food will always come out healthy and delicious!

Another way to arrange Shuba is to "pile it on" a flat dish instead of a deep one. This is how they serve it in restaurants.
Another way to arrange Shuba is to "pile it on" a flat dish instead of a deep one. This is how they serve it in restaurants.

All images in this article are my own work © kalinin1158. Please do not use without permission.

Questions & Answers

    © 2013 Lana Adler

    Comments

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      • kalinin1158 profile image
        Author

        Lana Adler 3 years ago from California

        Oh I hope you'll like it! Since you like herring, I think you won't find the taste strange or unpleasant, the rest are just vegetables! Thanks for stopping by, and I'd love to know how it turns out :)

      • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

        Claudia Mitchell 3 years ago

        What a wonderful looking salad. I've never had anything like this, but I love herring and the other ingredients too. Will be giving this a try!

      • kalinin1158 profile image
        Author

        Lana Adler 3 years ago from California

        This is the salad I make every year for New Year's, although if it wasn't so time-consuming, I would have made it all year long :) Homemade mayo - impressive! I do eat shuba with bread though, because the taste is so rich, bread dilutes it a bit. But I agree, shuba is pretty healthy. If you don't boil the crap out of vegetables :)

      • profile image

        Julia 3 years ago

        This is great recipe, exactly as I remember growing up in Ukraine. I was just able to replicate it in my kitchen with great results. I did it with home made mayonnaise made with egg yolks and best quality olive oil. Olive oil goes well with fish. I would not worry about calories coming from fat. You should worry about calories coming from sugar or grains as those are bed for your health. This salad is super healthy as long as you skip bread, which I did/

      • kalinin1158 profile image
        Author

        Lana Adler 4 years ago from California

        Na zdorovye! :-)

      • iguidenetwork profile image

        iguidenetwork 4 years ago from Austin, TX

        Your pictures are really good, your dish looks filling delicious. Thanks for sharing. :)

      • Vacation Trip profile image

        Susan 4 years ago from India

        Wow. This recipe looks awesome. Thank you for sharing.

      • kalinin1158 profile image
        Author

        Lana Adler 4 years ago from California

        You absolutely should! It's so tasty and nutritious, I've been craving it ever since I wrote the hub! And so easy and fun to make.

      • Ceres Schwarz profile image

        Ceres Schwarz 4 years ago

        This recipe for the Russian salad shuba looks really good. The images of the salad look tasty and delicious. Now I want to try some. This recipe does seem pretty easy and simple to make.

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