How to Make Fried Potatoes With Sausage, Sauerkraut, Onion, & Pepper - Delishably - Food and Drink
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How to Make Fried Potatoes With Sausage, Sauerkraut, Onion, & Pepper

Char is a creative writer, artist, and inventor—in and out of the kitchen.

minnesota-cooking-fried-potatoes-with-sauerkraut-and-bits-of-onion-and-pepper

Nothing Better Than This

It's true: You've found the perfect combo of fried potatoes with caramelized onions and bell peppers, fried crispy, with a jar of Frank's sauerkraut. As you let the flavor of the sauerkraut work its way through the potatoes, you'll find yourself eating a savory treat that will have you begging for more and more.

It's easiest to start with leftover baked potatoes. You have to slice them into thin slices and get a couple tablespoons of canola oil hot in a frying pan. Then, put your potatoes in, and when they have their first hint of rusty-tan browning, add a bunch of chopped onions and bell peppers, and let them all settle into each other. It takes about 20 minutes on medium heat for the potatoes to get color on all sides.

Then you add the sauerkraut and let it steam itself into the potatoes. Oh, yummy.

Cook Time

Prep timeCook timeReady inYields

1 hour

22 min

1 hour 22 min

serves two people with leftovers

Ingredients

  • 1 pint sauerkraut, not drained
  • 4 baked potatoes, sliced
  • 2 sweet peppers, chopped
  • 1/4 cup sweet onion, chopped
  • 1 Farmer Sausage
  • 1/2 teaspoon Lawry's, on potatoes
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil, to fry potatoes in

Instructions

  1. One pan of water to cover sausage. Bring water to boil, cover and turn down to simmer. Cook 22 minutes.
  2. Add 2 tablespoons oil in pan. Hot. Add potatoes. Brown slightly. Add onions and peppers. Put lid on pan, continue to brown and caramelize the peppers and onions. Add sauerkraut at end of 22 minutes and let flavor cook into the potatoes. About 10 minutes.
minnesota-cooking-fried-potatoes-with-sauerkraut-and-bits-of-onion-and-pepper

Farmer Sausage

Farmer sausage is a round, hot-dog-like, textured meat that is a full-flavored pork and beef mixture, and it is tied in a circle. You place it into a pan of water, bring that water to a boil, and then turn the heat down and simmer that sausage for the same length of time you fry your potatoes.

The sausage will plump up and cook, and then when everything is done, you slice up the sausage, dole out the potatoes, and eat like a king.

The Stuff

I sliced up my peppers, onions and potatoes hours before I needed to start cooking.

That was very convenient.

Frank's Kraut

Trust me, Frank's Kraut knows how to make sauerkraut.

It's really good.

minnesota-cooking-fried-potatoes-with-sauerkraut-and-bits-of-onion-and-pepper

New Ulm Farmer's Sausage

New Ulm is a city in Minnesota, and this farmer sausage is made at the Cashwise shop. They do a good job seasoning their farmer sausage.

I highly recommend them.

We have purchased farmer sausage from various meat shops, but the Cashwise shop rates pretty high on our list.

The flavor is a gentle savory blend of spices, there is a light flavor of garlic, and the sausage itself cooks up juicy, not dry. The perfect match for eating with fried potatoes.

minnesota-cooking-fried-potatoes-with-sauerkraut-and-bits-of-onion-and-pepper

Testing Oil for Readiness

You put your oil in the pan and wait for the oil to heat up.

How do you know when the oil is ready?

Well, the easiest method that I know of is to place one piece of onion in the oil. When you can hear it sizzling, and perhaps catch a whiff of its aroma while it's in that oil, it's time to put your potatoes in.

Lawry's Seasoned Salt

Any seasoned salt may do the trick, but my favorite seasoned salt to use on fried potatoes is Lawry's.

A person could use Greek Seasoning, or Johnny's, or some other brand of seasoned salt, but that is entirely up to the cook.

All are good, but Lawry's is my favorite.

minnesota-cooking-fried-potatoes-with-sauerkraut-and-bits-of-onion-and-pepper

Two Pans

As the potatoes are browning, the sausage is lightly boiling.

Then, as the sausage turns darker, you finally add the sauerkraut and let the heat of the pan brown the sauerkraut too.

Comments

Char Milbrett (author) from Minnesota on April 02, 2017:

Minnetonka Twin. You're welcome. Thanks for your comment.

Linda Rogers from Minnesota on April 02, 2017:

Nummy! Cant wait to make this recipe. Thanks for sharing.

Char Milbrett (author) from Minnesota on April 02, 2017:

Ms.Dora. Thanks for your comment. I'm sure turkey sausage would be fine. The sauerkraut and potatoes doesn't require any meat, so, you could substitute what you like. I have had rabbit stuffed with sauerkraut, so I imagine fried chicken would go good with it also. [Hmmm. Where can I find some rabbit at this late hour... smile.]

Dora Weithers from The Caribbean on April 02, 2017:

Sounds simple enough if I can substitute something else (will turkey sausage work?) for the pork sausage. Potatoes with peppers, onions and anything else should be good. Thanks for the recipe.