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Pork Loin Roast With Dijon Mustard Glaze and Sauce (Plus Mustard FAQs)

My husband and I both enjoy cooking. We like sampling and discovering new and different foods from all areas of the world.

Roasted pork napped with mustard sauce, baked asparagus, and crinkle-cut carrots with chopped parsley

Roasted pork napped with mustard sauce, baked asparagus, and crinkle-cut carrots with chopped parsley

My husband makes a delicious Dijon mustard glaze that he then turns about half of it into the most mouthwatering sauce you could ever taste. I kid him that the sauce would taste good on cardboard! When one of our local grocery stores had boneless center-cut pork loin for sale, we decided to take advantage of it.

When we buy such a large piece of pork, it makes many meals for us. We cut some of it into thin slices to make pork scallopini. Others we cut larger to make pork chops. We can also make one or more roasts out of it as we did to make this recipe. After cutting it up for various uses, we wrap and freeze it for later use.

If you enjoy saving money, look for sales and use your freezer to your best advantage. That way, you will always have a selection from which to choose when pricing is low.

Boneless center cut pork loin can be a bargain!

Boneless center cut pork loin can be a bargain!

Pork Loin Roast Mustard Recipe

My husband has the cookbook Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child, Louisette Bertholle, and Simone Beck. It is volume one and was published in 1973. As is often the case, he followed the recipe written for Gigot à la Moutarde, (Herbal Mustard Coating for Roast Lamb). The coating was for a 6-pound leg of lamb and was one of several variations for sauces.

After making the original recipe, he decided to use the mustard glaze on a pork loin roast in place of the lamb. He used the herb thyme in place of rosemary, and in addition, made a mustard sauce. I hope you enjoy his variation of the recipe as much as we do.

Cook Time

Prep timeCook timeReady inYields

15 min

1 hour 30 min

1 hour 45 min

8 generous servings

Ingredients

For the mustard glaze:

  • 3-pound boneless pork loin roast
  • 1/2 cup Dijon prepared mustard
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 garlic clove, finely minced or pressed
  • 1 teaspoon ground thyme
  • 1/4 teaspoon powdered ginger
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Pam cooking spray (for the roasting pan)

For the mustard sauce:

Add the remaining ingredients to the unused mustard glaze:

  • 1 (14.5-ounce) can low-sodium chicken broth
  • 7 ounces (or half an empty chicken broth can) of half & half
  • 1 ounce (pat) butter

Instructions

For the mustard glaze:

  1. Combine the mustard, soy sauce, garlic, thyme, ginger, and olive oil in a bowl and blend well.
  2. Score any fat or silver skin on the pork loin roast with some small cross-hatch knife cuts 1/8 to 1/4-inch depth.
  3. Paint all sides of the pork generously with the mustard glaze. Set it on a Pam-sprayed rack of a roasting pan. (The meat will absorb more flavor if it is coated several hours before roasting).
  4. Roast in a 350-degree Fahrenheit oven, 25 to 30 minutes per pound, or until it reaches an internal temperature of 145 degrees. Let it rest, covered with aluminum foil for 10 minutes before carving.

Tip: After removing meat from an oven, the temperature will continue to rise a few degrees higher, so keep that in mind when determining when the roast is to your liking as to doneness.

For the mustard sauce:

  1. To the remaining mustard glaze (of which there should be at least one-half or more), add the chicken broth and half & half. Blend well.
  2. In a pan on the stove, cook the sauce over medium heat for approximately 45-minutes to reduce it by half. If you enjoy a thicker or thinner sauce, adjust the cooking time.
  3. Finish the sauce with the pat of butter.
  4. Use the delicious sauce as desired over the cooked and sliced pork.

Suggested Wine Accompaniments

The stellar wine we enjoyed accompanying our meal with the distinctive mustard sauce flavors is a blended red wine from Tuscany in Italy. The grapes used in making this particular wine are Sangiovese and Malvasia Nera.

Other suggestions of wines that would be good to drink would be Chianti, Rosso di Montalcino, Pinot Noir, or Tempranillo. Of course, you may have ideas of your own after you make this delicious mustard glaze and mustard sauce.

Enjoying the meal with some good red wine from Tuscany.

Enjoying the meal with some good red wine from Tuscany.

 Mustards are several plant species in the genera Brassica and Sinapis whose small mustard seeds are used as a spice and, by grinding and mixing them with water, vinegar or other liquids, are turned into a condiment also known as mustard.

Mustards are several plant species in the genera Brassica and Sinapis whose small mustard seeds are used as a spice and, by grinding and mixing them with water, vinegar or other liquids, are turned into a condiment also known as mustard.

Mustard FAQs

  • Numerous varieties of mustard exist in the world today. Its origins come from Asia, Europe, high up in the Himalayas, and the sunny Mediterranean.
  • Cultivation of the wild plant began three thousand years before the birth of Christ.
  • The seeds and leaves of this herbaceous plant are edible and provide nutrients, including fiber, some vitamins, vital minerals, and antioxidants.
  • Possible health benefits range from home remedies for skin ailments to protection from heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and perhaps even some cancers. Continuing research may unearth even more benefits.
  • Its bright yellow flowers typically bloom in late spring to early summer and attract pollinators. We have seen many vineyards using this plant between the rows of grapevines. The annual mustard plant is then tilled under to further enrich the soil.
  • According to one source listed at the bottom of this page, 50% of the harvested mustard seed used in the world comes from Canada. It must be a beautiful sight to see those many fields of mustard in bloom!
  • Many people worldwide create different flavors of prepared mustard, and it is a widely appreciated condiment or ingredient used in making other recipes.

Dijon Mustard

Grey Poupon is a well-known brand of Dijon mustard. It is one of the ones we always use at home. It has a more assertive flavor than yellow mustard and gives an extra tangy flavor to dressings, sauces, recipes, or when used straight out of the jar as a sandwich spread or condiment.

People in Dijon, France, have a long history of mustard-making and wine growing. Combining brown and black mustard seeds and white wine, along with other ingredients, gives Dijon its distinctive character.

Maurice Grey created the recipe for Dijon mustard in 1866. August Poupon was his financial backer. You now know where the name originated. If you are interested to learn more, you can read additional information about this particular mustard in the source link below.

 Mustard seeds

Mustard seeds

Sources

© 2021 Peggy Woods

Comments

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on October 09, 2021:

Hi Brian,

Thanks for your plans to make this recipe for your family gathering. That is a compliment! Enjoy your weekend and your upcoming meal with your family.

Brian from Kuala Lumpur Malaysia on October 09, 2021:

Thank you for urging me to give it a try, Peggy. Your recipe will be a good guide for me to do so. Will try to make it for our family gathering and hope it looks as good as yours ;) Have a blessed weekend, Peggy.

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on October 07, 2021:

Hi Devika,

I am so pleased that you like the sound of this recipe. Thanks for taking the time to leave a comment.

Devika Primić from Dubrovnik, Croatia on October 06, 2021:

Peggy W I like your recipe idea nd sounds delicious too.

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on October 06, 2021:

Hi MG,

Thanks for commenting even though you are now following a vegetarian diet. You must be finding some good vegetarian recipes now. Enjoy!

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on October 05, 2021:

Hi Adrienne,

I agree that when the weather turns cool it is nice to have meals like this one. Our high temperature yesterday was 90, but the humidity was lower. At least we are moving in the right direction! Thanks for your comment. Enjoy your crisp fall days where you live.

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on October 05, 2021:

Hi Adrienne,

I agree that when the weather turns cool it is nice to have meals like this one. Our high temperature yesterday was 90, but the humidity was lower. At least we are moving in the right direction! Thanks for your comment. Enjoy your crisp fall days where you live.

MG Singh emge from Singapore on October 04, 2021:

Peggy, very nice article but I have now turned vegetarian as advised by my Yoga teacher but all the same you have presented it very well.

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on October 04, 2021:

Hi FlourishAnyway,

That is often what my husband does. He will try a recipe as it is written first, and then the second time start making changes of his own. He also invents some from scratch. I do the same. I am glad you enjoyed reading this recipe. Thanks for your comment.

Adrienne Farricelli on October 04, 2021:

This recipe sounds and looks delicious! I can see a nice pork loin roast dinner on the table in these nice crisp fall days.

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on October 04, 2021:

Hi Mary,

I am glad that you are fully equipped to make this recipe since you already have the pork purchased. I hope you enjoy the mustard glaze and sauce as much as we do. Thanks for your comment, and enjoy the new week.

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on October 03, 2021:

Hi Patricia,

I am sure you will love this recipe as much as we do when you make it. I appreciate your comment. Sending thoughts of angels to surround you and your precious loved ones.

FlourishAnyway from USA on October 03, 2021:

The best recipes are made by taking a good recipe like Julia's and substituting a little of this and a little of that like your husband did to make a great recipe. I always say that cooking and baking are as much art as they are science. This sounds splendid. Yum!

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on October 03, 2021:

Hi Liza,

I am glad I found your comment again also. Thanks! Enjoy the balance of your day and happy autumn to you too.

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on October 03, 2021:

Hi Misbah,

Enjoy this mustard glaze recipe with your lamb. Also, the sauce is so delicious. People could easily use only the glaze, or skip the glaze and make more of the sauce, depending upon the size of the meat. I am pleased that you also like my photos. Have a wonderful day, Misbah, and thanks for your comment.

Mary Norton from Ontario, Canada on October 03, 2021:

Now that summer is over. I'm back in the city, and yesterday, I got a pork tenderloin from the healthy butcher. This recipe is timely as I love mustard.

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on October 03, 2021:

Hi Chitrangada,

I am glad you liked reading the additional details about mustard. You mentioned using mustard in fish. That sounds good also. Thanks for your comment. Enjoy your weekend!

Patricia Scott from North Central Florida on October 02, 2021:

O my. My mouth is watering. I KNOW what a great cook you are so am certain this dish is divine. I am saving it to try later. Yum. Angels headed your way. ps

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on October 02, 2021:

Hi Brian,

Once in a while a good roast is hard to beat for flavor. I hope you give this recipe a try, especially since you are a mustard lover. Enjoy with my blessings! Thanks for your comment.

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on October 02, 2021:

Hello Umesh,

I am pleased that you enjoyed reading this recipe, and the additional information about the mustard plant, and who initially came up with the recipe for Dijon mustard. Thanks for your comment.

Liza from USA on October 01, 2021:

Oh, thank goodness! I'm glad you found it, Peggy :) Have a great weekend and happy autumn!

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on October 01, 2021:

Hi Liza,

I finally found your comment. I loved that movie "Julie, Julia" also. It was so much fun watching it. As to my husband being a good cook, I agree! I am one lucky lady! Thanks for your comment.

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on October 01, 2021:

Hi Liza,

I finally found your comment. I loved that movie "Julie, Julia" also. It was so much fun watching it. As to my husband being a good cook, I agree! I am one lucky lady! Thanks for your comment.

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on October 01, 2021:

Hi Kalpana,

Sorry if this recipe makes you drool. (Haha!) I wish you could taste it also. I guess the only way is to go ahead and make it. Thanks for your comment.

Misbah Sheikh from The World of Rebels. on October 01, 2021:

Hello, Peggy. I don't eat pork, but I'm glad that I can replace it with lamb. The recipe appears to be excellent. I'd like to give it a try someday. I always enjoy and appreciate how you use beautiful photographs to bring your articles to life. Your instructions are also very clear. Thank you for sharing. Have a wonderful weekend!

Blessings and Love!!

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on October 01, 2021:

Hi Rosina,

You are correct in writing that this mustard recipe would be delicious on other meats such as beef, lamb, and even chicken. Obviously other drinks, even water, would also be good. Thanks for your comment. Enjoy your upcoming weekend!

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on October 01, 2021:

Hi Liz,

Sometimes our freezers contain hidden treasures. It pays to inventory them occasionally. Like you, we have also found some items that have been pushed to the bottom or back. Enjoy your joints of pork sometime soon! Thanks for your comment.

Chitrangada Sharan from New Delhi, India on October 01, 2021:

Hello Peggy!

A very well written and presented recipe article. I liked going through the other additional details. I generally use Mustard in fish recipes. But this one sounds interesting.

Thank you for sharing! A good day and happy weekend to you!

Brian from Kuala Lumpur Malaysia on September 30, 2021:

Ms.Peggy, I am a mustard lover myself and this is quite a delicious meal of pork loin roast with mustard glaze. We rarely have roasts at home but your own looks so irresistible that makes me consider trying this out myself. Thanks for sharing the recipe .

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on September 30, 2021:

Hi Bill,

Happy to resurrect some happy memories of your mom making her pork loin roasts. They can be so delicious! Bev should make this recipe for you! Enjoy the balance of your week and upcoming weekend.

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on September 30, 2021:

Hi John,

That pork was a bargain indeed! We now have much of it frozen for future use. I am so happy to know that you enjoyed these recipes. Thanks for your comment.

Peggy Woods (author) from Houston, Texas on September 30, 2021:

Hi Pamela,

Any Dijon mustard lover should appreciate this recipe. If someone would wish to simply make the mustard sauce, they could double the amount of chicken broth, half & half, and the butter. It would be good on other meats as well. Thanks for being the first to comment.

Umesh Chandra Bhatt from Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, India on September 30, 2021:

Very detailed and elaborate recipe. Well explained

Kalpana Iyer from India on September 30, 2021:

Each time I see your lovely recipes, I drool a bit (sorry!). This one was no exception! I wish I could taste the sauce. Looks yummy.

Rosina S Khan on September 30, 2021:

I loved this recipe but I would rather like to try it out with roasted lamb or beef. I am sure having it with mustard glaze and sauce would be delicious. I would rather have cold drinks instead of wine. Thank you for sharing this wonderful recipe, Peggy.

Liz Westwood from UK on September 30, 2021:

This is a fascinating article to accompany a tasty recipe. I was recently cataliguing the contents of a freezer when I came across small joints of pork, cut from a larger joint which was on offer.

Liza from USA on September 30, 2021:

Your recipe makes me want to watch that movie again. Julie, Julia. I love that show! Though I don't consume pork, I am happy to know the original recipe is using lamb. Your dish plating looks amazing, Peggy, and your husband is a great cook!

Bill Holland from Olympia, WA on September 30, 2021:

Wow! I don't think I've had pork loin since I was a kid. My mom made it maybe once a month, and I loved it. You now have my mouth watering. Thanks for the memories, my friend.

John Hansen from Gondwana Land on September 30, 2021:

This recipe looks and sounds delicious, Peg. I love mustard and sauces so I will certainly give this a try. You certainly got a bargain with that piece of pork. 7.40lb for $13.10. Even allowing for the different values of our dollars. That would cost about $27AU. Thank you and your husband for sharing.

Pamela Oglesby from Sunny Florida on September 30, 2021:

I think you have presented another excellent recipe, Peggy. I really like Dijon mustard, so this works for me. As always you have provided great pictures and good step-by-step instructions.

Your husband seems to be a fantastic chef! Thank you for sharing this recipe.

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