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Pork Loin Roast With Dijon Mustard Glaze and Sauce (Plus Mustard FAQs)

I have a sizable tried-and-true cookie recipe file, but I am always eager to discover new ones. Who doesn't love cookies?

Roasted pork napped with mustard sauce, baked asparagus, and crinkle-cut carrots with chopped parsley

Roasted pork napped with mustard sauce, baked asparagus, and crinkle-cut carrots with chopped parsley

My husband makes a delicious Dijon mustard glaze that he then turns about half of it into the most mouthwatering sauce you could ever taste. I kid him that the sauce would taste good on cardboard! When one of our local grocery stores had boneless center-cut pork loin for sale, we decided to take advantage of it.

When we buy such a large piece of pork, it makes many meals for us. We cut some of it into thin slices to make pork scallopini. Others we cut larger to make pork chops. We can also make one or more roasts out of it as we did to make this recipe. After cutting it up for various uses, we wrap and freeze it for later use.

If you enjoy saving money, look for sales and use your freezer to your best advantage. That way, you will always have a selection from which to choose when pricing is low.

Boneless center cut pork loin can be a bargain!

Boneless center cut pork loin can be a bargain!

Pork Loin Roast Mustard Recipe

My husband has the cookbook Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child, Louisette Bertholle, and Simone Beck. It is volume one and was published in 1973. As is often the case, he followed the recipe written for Gigot à la Moutarde, (Herbal Mustard Coating for Roast Lamb). The coating was for a 6-pound leg of lamb and was one of several variations for sauces.

After making the original recipe, he decided to use the mustard glaze on a pork loin roast in place of the lamb. He used the herb thyme in place of rosemary, and in addition, made a mustard sauce. I hope you enjoy his variation of the recipe as much as we do.

Cook Time

Prep timeCook timeReady inYields

15 min

1 hour 30 min

1 hour 45 min

8 generous servings

Ingredients

For the mustard glaze:

  • 3-pound boneless pork loin roast
  • 1/2 cup Dijon prepared mustard
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 garlic clove, finely minced or pressed
  • 1 teaspoon ground thyme
  • 1/4 teaspoon powdered ginger
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Pam cooking spray (for the roasting pan)

For the mustard sauce:

Add the remaining ingredients to the unused mustard glaze:

  • 1 (14.5-ounce) can low-sodium chicken broth
  • 7 ounces (or half an empty chicken broth can) of half & half
  • 1 ounce (pat) butter

Instructions

For the mustard glaze:

  1. Combine the mustard, soy sauce, garlic, thyme, ginger, and olive oil in a bowl and blend well.
  2. Score any fat or silver skin on the pork loin roast with some small cross-hatch knife cuts 1/8 to 1/4-inch depth.
  3. Paint all sides of the pork generously with the mustard glaze. Set it on a Pam-sprayed rack of a roasting pan. (The meat will absorb more flavor if it is coated several hours before roasting).
  4. Roast in a 350-degree Fahrenheit oven, 25 to 30 minutes per pound, or until it reaches an internal temperature of 145 degrees. Let it rest, covered with aluminum foil for 10 minutes before carving.
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Tip: After removing meat from an oven, the temperature will continue to rise a few degrees higher, so keep that in mind when determining when the roast is to your liking as to doneness.

For the mustard sauce:

  1. To the remaining mustard glaze (of which there should be at least one-half or more), add the chicken broth and half & half. Blend well.
  2. In a pan on the stove, cook the sauce over medium heat for approximately 45-minutes to reduce it by half. If you enjoy a thicker or thinner sauce, adjust the cooking time.
  3. Finish the sauce with the pat of butter.
  4. Use the delicious sauce as desired over the cooked and sliced pork.

Suggested Wine Accompaniments

The stellar wine we enjoyed accompanying our meal with the distinctive mustard sauce flavors is a blended red wine from Tuscany in Italy. The grapes used in making this particular wine are Sangiovese and Malvasia Nera.

Other suggestions of wines that would be good to drink would be Chianti, Rosso di Montalcino, Pinot Noir, or Tempranillo. Of course, you may have ideas of your own after you make this delicious mustard glaze and mustard sauce.

Enjoying the meal with some good red wine from Tuscany.

Enjoying the meal with some good red wine from Tuscany.

 Mustards are several plant species in the genera Brassica and Sinapis whose small mustard seeds are used as a spice and, by grinding and mixing them with water, vinegar or other liquids, are turned into a condiment also known as mustard.

Mustards are several plant species in the genera Brassica and Sinapis whose small mustard seeds are used as a spice and, by grinding and mixing them with water, vinegar or other liquids, are turned into a condiment also known as mustard.

Mustard FAQs

  • Numerous varieties of mustard exist in the world today. Its origins come from Asia, Europe, high up in the Himalayas, and the sunny Mediterranean.
  • Cultivation of the wild plant began three thousand years before the birth of Christ.
  • The seeds and leaves of this herbaceous plant are edible and provide nutrients, including fiber, some vitamins, vital minerals, and antioxidants.
  • Possible health benefits range from home remedies for skin ailments to protection from heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and perhaps even some cancers. Continuing research may unearth even more benefits.
  • Its bright yellow flowers typically bloom in late spring to early summer and attract pollinators. We have seen many vineyards using this plant between the rows of grapevines. The annual mustard plant is then tilled under to further enrich the soil.
  • According to one source listed at the bottom of this page, 50% of the harvested mustard seed used in the world comes from Canada. It must be a beautiful sight to see those many fields of mustard in bloom!
  • Many people worldwide create different flavors of prepared mustard, and it is a widely appreciated condiment or ingredient used in making other recipes.

Dijon Mustard

Grey Poupon is a well-known brand of Dijon mustard. It is one of the ones we always use at home. It has a more assertive flavor than yellow mustard and gives an extra tangy flavor to dressings, sauces, recipes, or when used straight out of the jar as a sandwich spread or condiment.

People in Dijon, France, have a long history of mustard-making and wine growing. Combining brown and black mustard seeds and white wine, along with other ingredients, gives Dijon its distinctive character.

Maurice Grey created the recipe for Dijon mustard in 1866. August Poupon was his financial backer. You now know where the name originated. If you are interested to learn more, you can read additional information about this particular mustard in the source link below.

 Mustard seeds

Mustard seeds

Sources

© 2021 Peggy Woods

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