The Secret to The Best Shrimp Tempura

Updated on August 4, 2016
Hawaiian Scribe profile image

Stephanie Launiu is a Native Hawaiian lifestyle and cultural writer. She has a degree in Hawaiian Pacific Studies. She lives on O'ahu.

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Panko breadcrumbs are made by numerous manufacturers.
Panko breadcrumbs are made by numerous manufacturers.

The secret to delicious Shrimp Tempura

Have you ever been to a restaurant serving Japanese cuisine and wondered how they made such scrumptious shrimp tempura? Or how their batter was so light and crispy around the eggplant and zucchini they serve on the side?

Now you can cook Shrimp Tempura like a Japanese chef.

Although the shrimp is always the star on the plate, itʻs not the shrimp that makes the tempura so mouth-watering. The secret ingredient to the best tempura batter is a Japanese breadcrumb called Panko. Here in Hawaiʻi I can buy Panko at any grocery store. If you live somewhere where Asian food is not easily found, check out the Asian food aisle, look for Asian markets or search for an online source. Panko isnʻt expensive; you just have to find it.

Panko is not the brand name. Panko is a type of breadcrumb. There are many manufacturers who make Panko, including Progresso. Unlike regular breadcrumbs, Panko is made from bread without crusts. The crustless bread is coarsely ground into flakes that end up large and airy. Foods deep-fried in Panko end up with a light, crunchy coating, and they stay crispier longer because they donʻt absorb grease as easily.

For the best results, buy Panko breadcrumbs that are as FINELY ground as you can find. There are different types of crumbs from FINE to COARSE.

Panko can also be used as a binding agent in dishes like veggie burgers or crab cakes.

Using this recipe, your tempura batter will be light and crunchy. It can be used to deep fry fish, onions, sweet potato, eggplant, zucchini, thinly sliced carrots, mushrooms, snap beans, and tons of other healthy tidbits.

This is the easiest and best brand of frozen shrimp tempura I've found. 20 minutes in the oven and you've got shrimp just like in a Japanese restaurant. Excellent for 2 or 3 people.
This is the easiest and best brand of frozen shrimp tempura I've found. 20 minutes in the oven and you've got shrimp just like in a Japanese restaurant. Excellent for 2 or 3 people. | Source

If you don't want to cook, I found this shrimp at Costco!

I never thought I'd say this (or write it), but I recently found a frozen shrimp tempura brand at Costco that is excellent.

For me, cooking up a batch of shrimp tempura still makes sense for a group. But when there's only two of us eating, the frozen shrimp is already cooked and pops right into the oven on a cookie sheet. In each box of 20 frozen pre-breaded shrimp, there are four packages of 5 shrimps each so you don't have to cook all 20 at one time. There are even small packets of tempura dipping sauce included in the box.

After only twenty minutes, you've got shrimp tempura just as good as in a Japanese resturant.

In fact, I served it up to someone who said that they wonder whether the shrimp tempura they had in a restaurant was actually this brand from Costco. It was THAT good!

RECIPE FOR SHRIMP TEMPURA: Cook Time

Prep time: 20 min
Cook time: 20 min
Ready in: 40 min
Yields: Serves 2 @ 5 shrimp each.

Ingredients

  • 10 Jumbo shrimp or prawns, The bigger, the better!
  • 1 cup White flour
  • 1 1/2 cups Panko breadcrumbs
  • 3 Eggs, Youʻll only need the yolks
  • To increase yield:, Increase the ingredients to cook more than 10 shrimp. The average serving is 5-7 shrimp per person.
  1. Prepare shrimp. Remove shells. Make a shallow slit down the back to devein the shrimp. If you canʻt locate the vein, itʻs not a big deal.
  2. Turn the shrimp over and make a few tiny slits across the belly. Bend the shrimp so that it is as straight and long as possible. Lay aside on paper towels to absorb any moisture.
  3. Heat vegetable or peanut oil to 170 degrees C. If you donʻt use a thermometer, an easy way to check temperature is to use chopsticks. When there are small bubbles around the chopstick, the oil is ready.
  4. Separate out egg whites, and beat egg yolks. Youʻre not going to need the egg whites. Add 2 ice cubes into the bowl to keep the mixture cold. Set bowl aside.
  5. In a separate bowl place 1 cup white flour.
  6. In another bowl place 1 1/2 cups of Panko breadcrumbs.
  7. So now you have the shrimp laid out as long as possible, the egg yolk mixture, white flour in a bowl, and another bowl of Panko. Youʻre ready to roll!
  8. When the oil is hot, you are ready to deep fry the shrimp.
  9. Do these steps with each individual shrimp: Roll in flour, then dip in scrambled egg, then coat with Panko breadcrumbs and place carefully in fryer or a deep frying pan. Remember, the flour is first, NOT the scrambled egg mixture.
  10. Fry about 2 minutes on each side or until the batter is golden brown. Place the fried shrimp onto a plate lined with paper towels to absorb any oil. As soon as theyʻre cool, theyʻre ready to eat!

Questions & Answers

    © 2014 Stephanie Launiu

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      • Hawaiian Scribe profile imageAUTHOR

        Stephanie Launiu 

        2 years ago from Hawai'i

        Thanks for letting me know Cris Sp! I always make sure that panko is in my pantry, and you'll be a hit at the potluck. Happy cooking!

      • CrisSp profile image

        CrisSp 

        2 years ago from Sky Is The Limit Adventure

        Came back to let you know that panko works . Found it from the Asian Store and it's now a regular in my pantry.

        I'm making shrimp tempura again for next week's potluck!

        Thanks.

      • Kailua-KonaGirl profile image

        June Parker 

        3 years ago from New York

        Mahalo to you Stephanie. It is always a good thing to meet someone from home!

      • Hawaiian Scribe profile imageAUTHOR

        Stephanie Launiu 

        3 years ago from Hawai'i

        Mahalo Kailua-KonaGirl! It is always comforting to have a bit of local food wherever you may live. Tempura is one of my favorites, and so quick to make. Stay in touch. A hui hou, Stephanie

      • Kailua-KonaGirl profile image

        June Parker 

        3 years ago from New York

        Yum! I love tempura! When we were kids we use to go to a Japanese restaurant after school and buy tempura to eat on our walk home. LOL. When I make it now, I substitute a bit of corn starch for the flour in my batter for an even crispier coating. I love Panko and use it for just about everything that calls for breadcrumbs. Great Hub!

        Aloha!

      • Hawaiian Scribe profile imageAUTHOR

        Stephanie Launiu 

        3 years ago from Hawai'i

        Mahalo Thelma! Do let me know how it turns out for you. Aloha, Stephanie

      • Thelma Alberts profile image

        Thelma Alberts 

        3 years ago from Germany

        Yummy! I have not made tempura myself. Thanks for sharing the recipe. I´ll try this as soon as possible. Well done.

      • Hawaiian Scribe profile imageAUTHOR

        Stephanie Launiu 

        4 years ago from Hawai'i

        @CrisSp: Yes, you should be able to find panko in Canada. It comes in different brands. Just remember - flour, egg, panko. Come back & let me know how your batch turned out. I just made some last week along with sliced eggplant, and both were delicious!

      • CrisSp profile image

        CrisSp 

        4 years ago from Sky Is The Limit Adventure

        I landed in your hub by accident but it's a good turn over for an accident because I am looking for a recipe on tempura and this is just perfect. Just not sure if we have this "panko" in Canada. I'll surely check the Asian markets here and hopefully lucky enough to find this secret ingredient.

        Also, I don't care if it is called tempura or not, it is all breaded shrimp to me- crunchy, crispy, fresh! Lol!

        Thank you for sharing. Now drooling! :)

      • Hawaiian Scribe profile imageAUTHOR

        Stephanie Launiu 

        4 years ago from Hawai'i

        @Mitsuo: I am also on Oʻahu. We should get together and scope out the best tempura places, lol. I havenʻt been there in a while, but I used to like the shrimp tempura at Asahi Grill on Ward Ave. in Kakaʻako. It was always very light, not oily, and their shrimp were huge.

      • profile image

        Mitsuo 

        4 years ago

        We have good tempura places in Hawaii. Just gotta know where. Hehe I'm on Oahu. Had a place in Moiliili across now Longs but before when it was Star market I used to go to the restaurant for the Tempura because it was so good. But one day I went there and the Tempura was bad like very chewy and stale so I asked the waitress and she was so surprised. She asked me you really can tell the difference so I asked her what do you mean? She said they ran out of batter so she ran to Star market and bought the cheapest one. She said she would never do that again. Hehe if that was my first visiti then I wouldn't mention anything about the tempura, just I would never order it again. Think restaurant is now called Hide's if its still there. Owner came from Japan

        I worked at restaurant Suntory for over a decade in Waikiki and all chefs come from Japan except most Teppan chefs. Great food there but its not cheap. Hehe

      • Hawaiian Scribe profile imageAUTHOR

        Stephanie Launiu 

        4 years ago from Hawai'i

        Thank you @Mitsuo. Someone brought that to my attention a couple of months ago in an earlier comment. Here in Hawaiʻi we call it tempura. Guess Iʻll have to go to Japan to taste the "real stuff". Aloha.

      • profile image

        Mitsuo 

        4 years ago

        TEMPURA does not use Panko. EBI FRY uses Panko and these are 2 entirely different dishes. Many people are ignorant to traditional Japanese cosine.

      • Hawaiian Scribe profile imageAUTHOR

        Stephanie Launiu 

        4 years ago from Hawai'i

        Definitely give it a try. My tempura used to come out soft or too oily until I started using Panko. Be sure to dip the shrimp in flour before the egg mixture. Let me know how it goes. Aloha, Stephanie

      • jpcmc profile image

        JP Carlos 

        4 years ago from Quezon CIty, Phlippines

        I've been trying my luck on making tempura myself but i still fail at it. I hope I can do better with your recipe.

      • Lori P. profile image

        Lori Phillips 

        4 years ago from Southern California USA

        Thanks so much. I'll do the same!

      • Hawaiian Scribe profile imageAUTHOR

        Stephanie Launiu 

        4 years ago from Hawai'i

        Yes, I do mean "onolicious"! Always great meeting someone from the islands! I just started following you, and am looking forward to reading your hubs. Aloha, Stephanie

      • Lori P. profile image

        Lori Phillips 

        4 years ago from Southern California USA

        You mean, " ono-licious!" LOL. I'm actually from Hawaii myself!

      • Hawaiian Scribe profile imageAUTHOR

        Stephanie Launiu 

        4 years ago from Hawai'i

        Thanks Lori! Here in Hawaiʻi, I guess we call it all ʻtempuraʻ in this mixed-plate environment. I definitely am grateful for the lesson in proper Japanese terminology and cooking. Itʻs all so delicious! Aloha, Stephanie

      • Lori P. profile image

        Lori Phillips 

        4 years ago from Southern California USA

        This recipe looks delicious but just so you know, there is a difference between true tempura and bread crumb-coated fried shrimp in Japanese cuisine. One is called tempura and the latter falls under the category of "furai" (fried) or agemono (fried foods). Japanese chefs are able to create a light, lacy pattern on the butterflied shrimp with just a light drizzle of batter in the oil. Panko-coated shrimp is called "ebi furai."

      • Hawaiian Scribe profile imageAUTHOR

        Stephanie Launiu 

        4 years ago from Hawai'i

        Do try it and let me know how it turns out! Once you see how light and crispy the tempura is, youʻll be hooked. Aloha, Stephanie

      • Natashalh profile image

        Natasha 

        4 years ago from Hawaii

        Panko is amazing! I love cooking with it. I've actually never made tempura, though, because I've always figured I couldn't make it well. I have all the ingredients for your recipe at home - perhaps now is my time to try it!

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