How to Make Fruit Preserves for a Simple Fruit Cobbler

Updated on September 28, 2019
Amanda Buck profile image

Amanda has a decade's worth of homesteading experience: gardening, canning, butchering chickens, milking cows, and making maple syrup.

Peach cobbler and plum preserves
Peach cobbler and plum preserves

In this article I will show you how to make your own fruit preserves and how to use them in a simple fruit cobbler. I will also discuss how being creative in the kitchen can lead to self-acceptance. I hope you will stay with me to the end. Let's get started.

How to Make Fruit Preserves (Any Type)

  1. Select your fruit. Use fresh fruit, not fruit that is rotting. You can use fruit that is blemished if you can cut the blemishes out.
  2. If you use some unripe fruit along with your ripe fruit, you can eliminate the need for pectin. Most fruits contain pectin; some types have more pectin than others. Unripe fruit has more pectin than ripe fruit. I do not add additional pectin to my preserves because I don't mind if they are a little runny. If you wish to use pectin, read the label to see when to add it to the recipe.
  3. Wash your fruit in cold water.
  4. Quarter the fruit and remove the pits, cores, and seeds.
  5. Chop the fruit to the size you wish for your preserves, or use a food processor to shred the fruit.
  6. Place the fruit in a pot on the stove. Add up to 1/2 cup of water, cover, and cook to desired consistency. Remember to work in small batches so that you do not scorch your preserves. If you do end up scorching a batch, at least you won't have wasted all of your fruit. In my experience, there is no way to fix a scorched batch. It is best to feed it to the chickens.
  7. Add sugar and spices to taste. Stir well.

Now you are ready to can your preserves.

How to Can Fruit Preserves

  1. Sterilize your jars and new lids. There are several methods for doing this that can be found online.
  2. Preheat your water bath canner. If you have hard water, you can add a couple of tablespoons of vinegar to the water to keep it from leaving white residue on your jars. You may want to heat additional water in a kettle to add to the canner as needed.
  3. Preheat your jars by placing them on cookie sheets in a 170-degree oven. When you are ready to fill the jars, you can remove a whole cookie sheet and you are ready to go. You may also want to keep your lids warm in water on the back of the stove.
  4. Use a funnel and a ladle to carefully fill your jars. Fill to 1/4"-1/2" from the top of the jar. Place a lid and band on your jar and tighten.
  5. Carefully load jars into the canner basket and lower the basket into the water. Water should cover the tops to jars by at least an inch. Add hot water if needed, to be sure jars are adequately covered.
  6. Canner times vary by altitude. Look online for the recommended time for your location. If you can't find it, 15 minutes is a safe bet.
  7. Carefully lift the basket out of the water and remove your jars.

Peach Preserves

I like my peach preserves mildly sweet and a little on the chunky side. We eat them on toast, in vanilla yogurt, and right out of the jar! A little nutmeg gives them an interesting and robust flavor. They also make a great cobbler.

One year, I tried to make preserves from three boxes of store-bought peaches on the same day as saucing and canning 400 pounds of tomatoes! I ended up chopping and pitting the peaches and storing them in the freezer until I had time to make preserves. Apples and peaches store well in the freezer if you don't have time to process them when they are ripe.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Peaches ready for picking.Peaches can be blanched to loosen the skins for removal.  I no longer do this step.Peaches are chopped and the pits are removed.If you run out of time, at this point, peaches can be stored in the freezer until you are ready to process them.Peaches are cooked a with a little water and sugar to taste.  A dash of nutmeg can be added to enhance flavor.Peach preserves are ladled into preheated canning jars.The jars are placed in a water bath canner for 15 minutes.The preserves may separate as they cool; shake to reconstitute.Peach preserves ready for storage.
Peaches ready for picking.
Peaches ready for picking.
Peaches can be blanched to loosen the skins for removal.  I no longer do this step.
Peaches can be blanched to loosen the skins for removal. I no longer do this step.
Peaches are chopped and the pits are removed.
Peaches are chopped and the pits are removed.
If you run out of time, at this point, peaches can be stored in the freezer until you are ready to process them.
If you run out of time, at this point, peaches can be stored in the freezer until you are ready to process them.
Peaches are cooked a with a little water and sugar to taste.  A dash of nutmeg can be added to enhance flavor.
Peaches are cooked a with a little water and sugar to taste. A dash of nutmeg can be added to enhance flavor.
Peach preserves are ladled into preheated canning jars.
Peach preserves are ladled into preheated canning jars.
The jars are placed in a water bath canner for 15 minutes.
The jars are placed in a water bath canner for 15 minutes.
The preserves may separate as they cool; shake to reconstitute.
The preserves may separate as they cool; shake to reconstitute.
Peach preserves ready for storage.
Peach preserves ready for storage.

Plum Preserves

We planted our plum tree shortly after we moved to our farm. It took several years for it to produce. Then, it burst forth with a bountiful supply of tiny, cherry-sized plums. My girls will never forget the tedious task of pitting all those little plums. They made wonderful preserves with a slightly wild taste.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Plums, fresh from the tree.Plums washed and ready for processing.Plum preserves
Plums, fresh from the tree.
Plums, fresh from the tree.
Plums washed and ready for processing.
Plums washed and ready for processing.
Plum preserves
Plum preserves

Apple Sauce

Apple sauce is made in exactly the same way as the fruit preserves above. If you like your apple sauce chunky, cut your apples to the desired size and reduce the cook time, as apples turn to mush if you cook them too long. If you want a finer sauce, you can use a potato masher to mush it up as it cooks. We leave the skins on our apples, but for a finer sauce, you could remove them. We like our apple sauce on the tart side, so I only add enough sugar to take the edge off. Sometimes we add a little cinnamon, which makes the house smell wonderful. Apple sauce makes a great cobbler!

Click thumbnail to view full-size
My apple tree was loaded!Picked apples await processing.Apples are quartered and seeds are cores are removed.Quartered apples are run through a food processor and cooked down to a sauce.Apple sauce is canned for storage.
My apple tree was loaded!
My apple tree was loaded!
Picked apples await processing.
Picked apples await processing.
Apples are quartered and seeds are cores are removed.
Apples are quartered and seeds are cores are removed.
Quartered apples are run through a food processor and cooked down to a sauce.
Quartered apples are run through a food processor and cooked down to a sauce.
Apple sauce is canned for storage.
Apple sauce is canned for storage.

Simple Fruit Cobbler Recipe

Peach cobbler with vanilla yogurt.
Peach cobbler with vanilla yogurt.

Ingredients

  • 1 pint fruit filling (homemade preserves, applesauce, berries, or a 16 oz. can of store-bought pie filling)
  • 1/2 stick (4 tbsp) butter, melted
  • 1/2 cup flour (I use gluten free)
  • 1/2 cup sugar (feel free to cut down on the sugar or use an alternative sweetener)
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 cup milk

Instructions

  1. Melt the butter and pour into your baking dish. (This recipe is for a 9” round baking dish. You can adapt the recipe to fit a larger pan.)
  2. In a bowl, mix flour, sugar, baking powder, and any spices you wish to add. Use a wire whisk to mix.
  3. Add milk to flour mixture and stir until evenly combined.
  4. Pour batter into the center of the baking dish.
  5. Pour (or spoon) fruit into the center of the baking dish. The butter and batter should move to the sides of the dish. As it bakes, the batter will come up around the sides and form a crust on the top. Do not stir. (Note that if you are using raw fruit, you may need to add sugar and water to make a bit of syrup around your fruit, otherwise it may be too dry.)
  6. Top with a dusting of cinnamon sugar or crumb topping (optional).
  7. Bake at 375 degrees for 35 to 40 minutes, or until the cobbler is brown around the edges and the middle is bubbling.
  8. Serve with vanilla ice cream or a dollop of whipped cream on top (optional).

Recipe Variations

  • Add an egg to the batter to make a fluffier crust.
  • Pour the batter over the top of the fruit.
  • Try using different fruits and spices.
  • Add a crumb topping.
  • If you are really creative, you could try adapting the recipe to make a meal dish, such as quiche. You could make it the same way, but instead of fruit, pour your egg mixture into the center of the batter.
  • Experiment and have fun!

How Creativity in the Kitchen Can Lead to Self-Acceptance

I’m a bit of a rebel when it comes to following a recipe. To me, a recipe is more of a guideline, so that in the end you have something close to what you were trying to make. I believe in creativity and authenticity, making something that suits your personal tastes. Straying from the recipe might be scary at first, but it can also be freeing. It might seem silly, but cooking can become a lesson in self-acceptance. Being okay with your creation, no matter how it turns out, is giving yourself grace. Grace leads to acceptance, and acceptance leads to love.

Usually, the recipe will taste good, even if it doesn’t look good or have the right consistency. Take brownies for example; unless you totally burn them to inedible char, they taste good. I’ve had brownies I had to eat with a spoon, and brownies that were the consistency of pound cake. But, they were still brownies and I liked them. If you make something and it doesn’t turn out quite right, don’t give up! It is a learning process. Tweak your recipe until you get the result you are going for. But in the process, relax, be free, and practice loving yourself and your mistakes.

Here is an excellent recipe guideline that you can play with. It is a simple fruit cobbler. You can use whatever fruit you like. You can make it in whatever size and shape you like. I have used a 9” round pie pan and a 9”x13” rectangular pan. I have made apple cobbler, peach cobbler, cherry cobbler, rhubarb cobbler, grape cobbler, and I think I made a garden huckleberry cobbler one year. You can play with adding different spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, cardamom, cloves and allspice to the batter. I adapted this recipe from a family cookbook.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

Questions & Answers

    © 2019 Amanda Buck

    Comments

      0 of 8192 characters used
      Post Comment
      • Amanda Buck profile imageAUTHOR

        Amanda Buck 

        4 weeks ago from Rural South Central Indiana

        Good! Let me know how it turns out Louise!

      • louiseelcross profile image

        Louise Elcross 

        4 weeks ago from Preston

        Thanks for this sharing this information Amanda. I do make jam from fruit I gather from all around me and now I will now try a cobbler because it looks good. .

      • Amanda Buck profile imageAUTHOR

        Amanda Buck 

        6 weeks ago from Rural South Central Indiana

        Hi Liza, I am glad that my article inspired you. Applesauce is so easy to make, I think you will enjoy it! Hope it turns out well for you. Thank you for your comment.

      • lizmalay profile image

        Liza 

        6 weeks ago from UT,USA

        I have made raspberry jam with my mother in law. That was my first time making a homemade jam from fruits. I came from a tropical country, where we didn't grow berries in our backyard :) So, it was a nice experience I ever had. This article motivates me to make my first homemade applesauce, :) Thanks for sharing, Amanda.

      • Amanda Buck profile imageAUTHOR

        Amanda Buck 

        7 weeks ago from Rural South Central Indiana

        Tori, we tend to eat our main meal of the day in the early afternoon, so cobbler with some vanilla yogurt on top makes a nice light supper later in the day. We even sprinkle some granola on it at times... hey, that's a good idea, topping the cobbler with granola! Thanks for your comment!

      • renee21 profile image

        Tori Leumas 

        7 weeks ago

        I love homemade applesauce and jams, so yummy! I've made cobblers before too. I like to eat them warm with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. I often make things for my family. I should make a cobbler soon.

      working

      This website uses cookies

      As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, delishably.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

      For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://delishably.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

      Show Details
      Necessary
      HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
      LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
      Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
      AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
      Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
      CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
      Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
      Features
      Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
      Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
      Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
      Marketing
      Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
      Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
      Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
      Statistics
      Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
      ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
      ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)