Blueberry Pear Jam With Vanilla and Anise - Delishably - Food and Drink
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Blueberry Pear Jam With Vanilla and Anise

I perfected a jam recipe using vanilla and anise to flavor blueberry and pear jam. I hope you enjoy it!

Finished jam! It's so pretty!

Finished jam! It's so pretty!

What Inspired This Recipe?

I was trying to come up with a jam recipe to use for wedding favors, but me being the persnickety person I am, I wanted it to be perfect. I had looked on Pinterest for numerous recipes and googled a bunch too, but the recipes I tried didn't deliver on their promises. I got so desperate that I tried making blackberry jam using frozen blackberries. This led me to the conclusion that my jam would taste better if I used fruits that were in season or at least available ripe at the grocery store. So I settled on pears and blueberries.

I looked into the ratio of fruit to pectin and mostly just used my jam making experience to form a recipe that I hoped would work out. I expected to have to experiment a lot, but on the first try, it was amazing. I was skeptical when I added the anise because I hate black licorice and had literally never heard of anise before I decided to try adding it to my recipe. So I realized what anise was right when I was adding it to my jam at the last moment and fervently hoped I would not hate it. I could literally eat this jam for the rest of my life and be happy.

Tips and Tricks

  • Be sure you are using full-sugar pectin as this recipe is heavy in sugar, but lower in pectin naturally. Also, don't use freezer pectin.
  • Be sure you are constantly stirring your jam once it has started to bubble, otherwise, it will get everywhere or potentially burn you.
  • Always add your extracts after you have finished cooking your jam so that they do not cook off.
  • Always cook your jam for at least a minute at a rolling boil after adding sugar so the pectin will set later.
The pear blueberry mixture is very thick, even with the water added so when it heats up it bubbles and pops. I didn't realize this until after my kitchen was destroyed. The best way to avoid getting it everywhere is to make sure to constantly stir it

The pear blueberry mixture is very thick, even with the water added so when it heats up it bubbles and pops. I didn't realize this until after my kitchen was destroyed. The best way to avoid getting it everywhere is to make sure to constantly stir it

Yield

12-16 four ounce jars, depending upon pear size.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups sugar
  • 4 large D'anjou Pears, cut and peeled
  • 2 cups blueberries
  • 1/2 teaspoon anise extract
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons lemon juice, fresh or bottled
  • 1 cup water
  • 2/3 cup sweet wine, such as moscato or spumante
  • 2 teaspoons butter

Canning Safety

The temperature advised in number 7 is only applicable if you are using a water bath canning system or pressure cooker for canning. If you are using any method of canning that does not involve processing the jars after they have been filled, you may need to aim for a higher temperature based on canning safety to prevent bacteria growth.

I could literally eat this jam recipe for the rest of my life and be happy.

I could literally eat this jam recipe for the rest of my life and be happy.

Instructions

  1. Place blueberries, 1 cup of water, and pears in a blender. Be sure the pears are on top so it blends better and does not need to be mixed as much.
  2. Pour fruit mixture into a large 4 qt pan.
  3. Add all of the pectin and mix it up until it is completely dissolved.
  4. Add butter to the mixture.
  5. Cook the fruit/pectin mixture on medium-high heat until the mixture reaches about 190 degrees Fahrenheit.
  6. Add sugar and wine and stir it up until all the sugar is dissolved.
  7. Cook the jam mixture until the temperature reaches 208 degrees Fahrenheit.
  8. Once the mixture has reached the proper temperature, turn off the burner and add the vanilla and anise extracts. Be careful using too much anise if you do not care for black licorice; this recipe does not result in a strong black licorice taste, but too much more anise might.
  9. Pour the jam into sterile jars, seal them, and then finish canning them with your preferred method. Most canners process similar jams for 5 minutes at an altitude of 1,000 feet or less, but for this particular recipe, I recommend processing for at least 10 minutes
  10. Let to set for 48 hours.

This Recipe Makes for a Great Gift

The jam will be set enough to use after 24 hours if you can’t wait to try it, but for long-term storage, they need to set in a cool place for at least 48 hours. Please feel free to use this recipe for gifts or wedding favors or something along those lines. Please do not use this recipe for personal profit.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2018 oneta cantlon