Pressure Canning Sweet Corn Off the Cob

Updated on August 8, 2018
VVanNess profile image

Victoria is a stay-at-home mom, author, blogger at Healthy at Home, and educator. She currently lives in Colorado with her family.

Other than the fall, this is one of my favorite times of the year. Berries go on sale, peaches are ripe and sweet, and my favorite sweet corn goes on sale at Sprouts for 10 ears for $1. We wait for more corn to can all year long. It seems like no matter how much I can every summer, we go through all of it in a matter of months, and then we are waiting for sweet corn to be in season again.

I know corn has been under serious debate due to the fact that the majority of it on the market is genetically modified (GMO). As with most food products that you can find at the grocery store, it is difficult to find anything real and untainted anymore. But I have this great store, called Sprouts, where they have everything grown specifically for distribution to Sprouts stores. Everything is grown organically, without pesticides or other chemicals. I love knowing that I can trust everything I purchase there.

They also have fantastic sales that allow me to take advantage of all of the great food they provide at super prices. At our house, we simply stock up on the basics, like locally sourced honey, old-fashioned oats, all of our raw nuts and seeds, coconut oil, whole wheat flour, coconut sugar, milk from the dairy, grass-fed cheese and butter, and even grass-fed meats, and then we make all of our own foods here at home. being able to can my own corn and other fruits and veggies is a real bonus.

5 stars from 2 ratings of Canning Corn

Cook Time

Prep time: 30 min
Cook time: 1 hour
Ready in: 1 hour 30 min
Yields: 6 pints of canned corn

Ingredients

  • 16 ears corn
  • 3 cups boiling water

Instructions

  1. Start by shucking each of your ears of corn. You'll need to pull the husks off of the outside, break the stem off and then pull the silk off. Keep the husks and silk in separate bowls. You can use them.
  2. Now, to help cut the kernels off of the cob, cut the stem off flat so you have a flat base to balance you corn cob.
  3. Hold the cob upright and run your knife firmly down the side of your corn cob to slice all of the kernels off. Pour the kernels from each cob into a large bowl.
  4. Set the cobs aside for later use.
  5. Now set up your canning station. You'll need a pressure canner, a large pot of boiling water, at least 6 pint canning jars with lids and rings, a canning kit, a ladle, a damp washcloth and a couple of towels.
  6. Using your canning funnel, fill each jar with corn up to the neck of the jar.
  7. Now fill each with boiling water to the neck.
  8. Wipe your jar rims with a damp washcloth to remove any liquid or food.
  9. Add a clean lid to each of your jars.
  10. Add a clean ring to each jar, but twist only until you feel the slightest resistance. You want air to be able to escape.
  11. Use your jar lifter to load your jars into your canner. None should be touching any other jar or the pot in any way.
  12. Make sure the pot has 3 quarts of water in the bottom, and that's it.
  13. Put the top on the pot and lock it in place. Turn your heat to the setting just below the highest.
  14. When steam starts to pour out of the top vent in a steady stream, start your timer for 10 minutes. The lid lock should pop a couple minutes in.
  15. At the end of 10 minutes, set the weighted gauge (or rocker) on top of the vent. I have a weighted gauge canner.
  16. In another 6 minutes or so the weighted gauge will start rocking from side to side. At this point, set your timer to 1 hour and turn the heat down to just above medium.
  17. You want the rocker to continue rocking the entire canning process, but as slow as possible (meaning with as little heat as possible). If the rocker stops, turn the heat up and get it going again, and then restart the timer.
  18. At the end of your time, turn off the heat and remove the canner from the hot burner carefully. Do not try and touch the rocker or lid.
  19. After the pressure decreases inside the pot the lid lock will fall. At this time you can remove the rocker only. DO NOT remove the lid yet.
  20. Give it 10 more minutes to cool, and then you can remove the lid, facing away from you, so you don't get burned.
  21. Carefully remove your jars with your jar lifter and place them on a towel to the side to cool for 24 hours.
  22. When your jars seal, the middle of the lids will suck down and if tapped, your lids will ping. If they all sealed, congrats! Remove the rings, label them with at least the date, and store them in a cool, dry place. We remove the rings to store them because bacteria can grow under them and compromise your jar of food.
  23. If 2-3 didn't seal and make a thudding sound when tapped, put them in the fridge and use them right away. If 4 or more didn't seal, remove the lids and rings, refill any missing liquid, rewipe the rims, replace the lids with clean ones and try processing them again.
  24. Your sealed jars should last at least a year.
Click thumbnail to view full-size
Start with a bunch of corn.Enlist some help to shuck all of the corn, but save the husks and silk separately for later.More help coming...(the husks)Now it's time to cut the corn from the cob. Cut the end off of one to have a flat surface to set it on.Set it up on end and run your knife along the side of the cob, cutting all of the kernels off.(the silk and empty corn cobs)Pour it all into a large bowl as you cut it.Now it's time to set up your canning station. You'll need pint canning jars with lids and rings, a canner, a pot of boiling water, a canning kit and a ladle.Fill each of your jars with corn up to the neck of each jar.Or have someone else do it for you.Now fill each with boiling water up to the neck of each jar.Wipe the rims with a damp washcloth.Add a clean lid to each jar.Add rings to each jar, twisting only until you feel the slightest resistance.Use your jar lifter to load your jars into your canner.Your canner only needs 3 quarts of water in the bottom.I only got 6 pint jars out of those 16 ears of corn.Put on the lid and lock it.There are directions to help you on the side of the canner.
Start with a bunch of corn.
Start with a bunch of corn.
Enlist some help to shuck all of the corn, but save the husks and silk separately for later.
Enlist some help to shuck all of the corn, but save the husks and silk separately for later.
More help coming...
More help coming...
(the husks)
(the husks)
Now it's time to cut the corn from the cob. Cut the end off of one to have a flat surface to set it on.
Now it's time to cut the corn from the cob. Cut the end off of one to have a flat surface to set it on.
Set it up on end and run your knife along the side of the cob, cutting all of the kernels off.
Set it up on end and run your knife along the side of the cob, cutting all of the kernels off.
(the silk and empty corn cobs)
(the silk and empty corn cobs)
Pour it all into a large bowl as you cut it.
Pour it all into a large bowl as you cut it.
Now it's time to set up your canning station. You'll need pint canning jars with lids and rings, a canner, a pot of boiling water, a canning kit and a ladle.
Now it's time to set up your canning station. You'll need pint canning jars with lids and rings, a canner, a pot of boiling water, a canning kit and a ladle.
Fill each of your jars with corn up to the neck of each jar.
Fill each of your jars with corn up to the neck of each jar.
Or have someone else do it for you.
Or have someone else do it for you.
Now fill each with boiling water up to the neck of each jar.
Now fill each with boiling water up to the neck of each jar.
Wipe the rims with a damp washcloth.
Wipe the rims with a damp washcloth.
Add a clean lid to each jar.
Add a clean lid to each jar.
Add rings to each jar, twisting only until you feel the slightest resistance.
Add rings to each jar, twisting only until you feel the slightest resistance.
Use your jar lifter to load your jars into your canner.
Use your jar lifter to load your jars into your canner.
Your canner only needs 3 quarts of water in the bottom.
Your canner only needs 3 quarts of water in the bottom.
I only got 6 pint jars out of those 16 ears of corn.
I only got 6 pint jars out of those 16 ears of corn.
Put on the lid and lock it.
Put on the lid and lock it.
There are directions to help you on the side of the canner.
There are directions to help you on the side of the canner.
Nutrition Facts
Serving size: 1
Calories 82
Calories from Fat9
% Daily Value *
Fat 1 g2%
Saturated fat 0 g
Unsaturated fat 0 g
Carbohydrates 20 g7%
Sugar 4 g
Fiber 2 g8%
Protein 2 g4%
Cholesterol 0 mg
Sodium 15 mg1%
* The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, so your values may change depending on your calorie needs. The values here may not be 100% accurate because the recipes have not been professionally evaluated nor have they been evaluated by the U.S. FDA.

As you see in the pictures, the corn in the jars is kind of cloudy. That is simply the milk from the corn cobs and the smaller pieces of corn that were mixed in with the corn in the jars. There's nothing wrong with it. In fact, I made Chicken Pot Pie on the stove last night using a jar of my freshly canned sweet corn, and it was deliciously sweet. I think the milk gives it a little bit more than the corn you can find at the store already canned.

I'm pretty sure that all of my favorite recipes include corn. The very best of the best recipe I use being my Corn Casserole. My canned corn also makes a great quick side to any dinner dish, or drop in for most soups, and casseroles when we have it on hand. The canned stuff you buy at the store, even if it's organic, just simply doesn't come anywhere close to tasting quite as good as my homemade corn does.

I truly hope that all of my canning recipes motivate you to try some of these recipes out yourself and see just how much better homemade canned products from fresh fruits and vegetables can be. Subscribe to my Hubpages profile for more great canning and other recipes!

Questions & Answers

    © 2018 Victoria Van Ness

    Comments

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      • VVanNess profile imageAUTHOR

        Victoria Van Ness 

        8 days ago from Fountain, CO

        Absolutely! I still need to go get more!

      • Pamela99 profile image

        Pamela Oglesby 

        2 weeks ago from Sunny Florida

        I love corn, and this sounds like a great idea. Thanks for the particulars.

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