Pressure Canning Your Own Black-Eyed Peas

Updated on May 17, 2018
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Victoria is a stay-at-home mom, author, blogger at Healthy at Home, and educator. She currently lives in Colorado with her family.

Pressure Canning Black-Eyed Peas
Pressure Canning Black-Eyed Peas | Source
5 stars from 1 rating of Pressure Canned Black-Eyed Peas

I am absolutely crazy about canning! But I'm even more crazy about providing my family with good, nutritious food. What I love about canning my own food is that I know what ingredients are going into each and every jar. For instance, when I pressure can my black-eyed peas, it's literally just black-eyed peas that I soaked in a large pot of water the night before, a small amount of pink Himalayan salt, and boiling water. There are never any chemicals, preservatives, or man-made ingredients. They are beans, natural salt, and water—and, boy, are they delicious.

In fact, everything I can tastes exactly like its supposed to. My canned pineapple looks and tastes like fresh-cut pineapple. My canned corn was cut straight from the cobs of organic sweet corn from Sprouts. It's bright yellow, crunchy, and extremely sweet straight out of the jars. Once again, I only put corn, Himalayan salt, and boiling water in my jars. My applesauce is just chopped up apples cooked in a crockpot all day, blended and poured into jars. They have no sugar, no salt, or any other ingredients.

Not only can I provide a healthier, better-tasting food option for my family by canning, but I really enjoy doing it as well. I get a strong sense of satisfaction being productive, doing something for my family, and getting to know that we are enjoying food every night that I made with my two hands. And then I get to teach my children how to do the same for themselves. My oldest little boy has been helping me can ever since he could stand in a chair beside me. You'll see his pictures in a variety of my canning tutorials because I'm hard pressed to keep him from helping. Let me show you how easy it can be.

Cook Time

Prep time: 13 hours
Cook time: 1 hour 15 min
Ready in: 14 hours 15 min
Yields: 9 pints of black-eyed peas each round

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs dried black-eyed peas
  • 4.5 teaspoons pink Himalayan salt
  • about 9 cups boiling water

Instructions

  1. Soak beans overnight in water. Refill when needed.
  2. Rinse beans and set up your canning station.
  3. You'll need a pressure canner, a pot of boiling water, a spoon, 9 pint jars, 9 lids, and 9 rings, and your canning supplies.
  4. Fill each jar with your soaked, rinsed beans, just to the bottom of the neck of each jar.
  5. Add 1/2 teaspoon of salt to each jar.
  6. Fill jars to the bottom of the neck of each jar with boiling water.
  7. Release air bubbles in each jar and refill as needed with water.
  8. Wipe the rims with a damp washcloth.
  9. Put a lid on each jar.
  10. Put a ring on each jar, tightening only until you feel the slightest resistance.
  11. Add jars to canner. Your canner will need 3 quarts of water in the bottom.
  12. Put on the lid and lock it into place. Turn the heat on your stove to high just below the very highest setting.
  13. For a weighted gauge pressure canner, when the air vent on top starts spouting steam, give it ten minutes to vent before putting on the weighted gauge. Your air lock in the back will pop in the middle of this process.
  14. When the weighted gauge starts to rock, turn your heat down to about medium (you still want at least a slow rock), and set your timer for 1 hour and 15 minutes.
  15. When the time is up, turn the heat off on the stove and let the pressure canner cool down on it's own. It will take about an hour and a half for it to release all of the pressure inside.
  16. The air lock will go down when it is done and you can remove the weighted gauge, but leave the lid on for ten more minutes.
  17. When the time is up, remove your jars, setting them aside on a towel to cool for 24 hours, and you can start the next cycle if you wish.
  18. You will know that your jars have sealed when you hear them popping. If after 24 hours there are any jars that did not seal, put them in the fridge and use them within a few days.
  19. If more than 4 jars did not seal, you can reprocess them. but first you must remove the ring and lid, make sure the water level is still at the bottom of the neck, put a clean lid and ring back on and go for it again.
  20. Store your jars in a cool place like the pantry or basement without their rings. They should last at least a year if not more.
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Step One: Fill a large pot about halfway with the dried black eyed peas you'd like to can.Step Two: Fill the pot all the way to the top with water.My beans overflowed the pot within an hour, so I had to split them up into two pots and refill them both with water to soak overnight.Step Three: In the morning, pour your beans into a strainer to rinse.Step Four: Fill a large pot with water to boil for canning.Step Five: Pour your beans into a large bowl so you can step up your canning area.Step Six: Set up your canning station. You'll need your pressure canner and a large pot of boiling water.Step Seven: Fill each of your jars to the bottom of each jar neck with beans.Step Eight: Add about a half a teaspoon of salt to each jar.Step Nine: Fill each jar to the bottom of each jar neck with boiling water.Step Ten: This is a good time to release any trapped air bubble in your jars. You can do this by sliding a knife gently into the inside edges of your jars and pushing gently on the beans.Step Eleven: Wipe the rim of your jars to remove any liquid or debris.Step Twelve: Add lids to each of your jars.Step Thirteen: Add rings to each jar tightening only until you feel the slightest bit of resistance.Step Fourteen: Add your jars to your pressure canner. The canner will need 3 quarts of water to process your jars.For some reason I can't get the picture to turn over. But my canner holds nine pint jars. You don't want them to touch each other or the sides of the canner while cooking.Step Fifteen: Lock the lid of your canner and turn the heat up to just below the highest setting.Step Sixteen: This is where it gets hard. I will explain further how to know when to add the weighted gauge and when to start the timer.Step Seventeen: When finished, remove your jars and set them out to cool on a towel for 24 hours.
Step One: Fill a large pot about halfway with the dried black eyed peas you'd like to can.
Step One: Fill a large pot about halfway with the dried black eyed peas you'd like to can.
Step Two: Fill the pot all the way to the top with water.
Step Two: Fill the pot all the way to the top with water.
My beans overflowed the pot within an hour, so I had to split them up into two pots and refill them both with water to soak overnight.
My beans overflowed the pot within an hour, so I had to split them up into two pots and refill them both with water to soak overnight.
Step Three: In the morning, pour your beans into a strainer to rinse.
Step Three: In the morning, pour your beans into a strainer to rinse.
Step Four: Fill a large pot with water to boil for canning.
Step Four: Fill a large pot with water to boil for canning.
Step Five: Pour your beans into a large bowl so you can step up your canning area.
Step Five: Pour your beans into a large bowl so you can step up your canning area.
Step Six: Set up your canning station. You'll need your pressure canner and a large pot of boiling water.
Step Six: Set up your canning station. You'll need your pressure canner and a large pot of boiling water.
Step Seven: Fill each of your jars to the bottom of each jar neck with beans.
Step Seven: Fill each of your jars to the bottom of each jar neck with beans.
Step Eight: Add about a half a teaspoon of salt to each jar.
Step Eight: Add about a half a teaspoon of salt to each jar.
Step Nine: Fill each jar to the bottom of each jar neck with boiling water.
Step Nine: Fill each jar to the bottom of each jar neck with boiling water.
Step Ten: This is a good time to release any trapped air bubble in your jars. You can do this by sliding a knife gently into the inside edges of your jars and pushing gently on the beans.
Step Ten: This is a good time to release any trapped air bubble in your jars. You can do this by sliding a knife gently into the inside edges of your jars and pushing gently on the beans.
Step Eleven: Wipe the rim of your jars to remove any liquid or debris.
Step Eleven: Wipe the rim of your jars to remove any liquid or debris.
Step Twelve: Add lids to each of your jars.
Step Twelve: Add lids to each of your jars.
Step Thirteen: Add rings to each jar tightening only until you feel the slightest bit of resistance.
Step Thirteen: Add rings to each jar tightening only until you feel the slightest bit of resistance.
Step Fourteen: Add your jars to your pressure canner. The canner will need 3 quarts of water to process your jars.
Step Fourteen: Add your jars to your pressure canner. The canner will need 3 quarts of water to process your jars.
For some reason I can't get the picture to turn over. But my canner holds nine pint jars. You don't want them to touch each other or the sides of the canner while cooking.
For some reason I can't get the picture to turn over. But my canner holds nine pint jars. You don't want them to touch each other or the sides of the canner while cooking.
Step Fifteen: Lock the lid of your canner and turn the heat up to just below the highest setting.
Step Fifteen: Lock the lid of your canner and turn the heat up to just below the highest setting.
Step Sixteen: This is where it gets hard. I will explain further how to know when to add the weighted gauge and when to start the timer.
Step Sixteen: This is where it gets hard. I will explain further how to know when to add the weighted gauge and when to start the timer.
Step Seventeen: When finished, remove your jars and set them out to cool on a towel for 24 hours.
Step Seventeen: When finished, remove your jars and set them out to cool on a towel for 24 hours.
Nutrition Facts
Serving size: 1
Calories 70
Calories from Fat0
% Daily Value *
Fat 0 g
Saturated fat 0 g
Unsaturated fat 0 g
Carbohydrates 16 g5%
Sugar 3 g
Fiber 4 g16%
Protein 3 g6%
* The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, so your values may change depending on your calorie needs. The values here may not be 100% accurate because the recipes have not been professionally evaluated nor have they been evaluated by the U.S. FDA.
Source

I know the process seems difficult, and yes it takes some time to do and to learn, but practice definitely makes perfect. I started with pressure canning refried beans first. And that's what you do. You pick one thing and you figure that out before you move on to something else. What is it that your family uses the most of? What could you benefit from the most at your house?

Is it refried beans like at our house? Or maybe it's pasta sauce? I think those are the most typical items. You could even start with canning veggies like carrots, corn, green beans or black-eyed peas. Pick one item. Try out the process and work out the kinks, AND THEN try out something new. Pasta sauce was the second thing we tried, which quickly turned into tomato soup, salsa, diced tomatoes and tomato paste. When I find tomatoes on sale, I usually buy them by the hundreds of pounds and do everything.

Don't let all the steps or all of the options overwhelm you. Pick one item. That's it. And if you ever have any questions, you can call the manufacturer of your canner and ask them. Presto, I know from experience, is exceptionally nice and helpful. Be on the lookout for my free Canning Recipe Book and my two canning courses coming up. I will help you learn everything you need to know about canning. One of these days you'll look back and wonder what it was like not to can anything for your family.

Have you ever pressure canned anything?

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Questions & Answers

    © 2018 Victoria Van Ness

    Comments

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      • VVanNess profile imageAUTHOR

        Victoria Van Ness 

        2 months ago from Fountain, CO

        You'll have to check out my pressure canning course coming up! Livehealthyathome. com

      • Coffeequeeen profile image

        Louise Powles 

        2 months ago from Norfolk, England

        I've never tried pressure canning anything, but it sounds a really good idea. I'd like to try this.

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