Venison and Red Wine Stew Recipe - Delishably - Food and Drink
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Venison and Red Wine Stew Recipe

Gordon loves cooking and experimenting with food. He loves making new dishes, particularly with unusual or underused ingredients.

Venison: What Is It?

Venison at one time was the generic name used to mean any one of a number of types of wild game. In modern times, however, it is generally used to describe only meat that has come from a member of the deer family—from red deer to moose to caribou.

The venison used in this recipe comes from farmed deer in the North of Scotland. Although venison of this type used to be fairly difficult to obtain, it can now commonly be found in vacuum packs in supermarkets at a fairly affordable price. Alternatively, venison packed in this way can be purchased from a variety of online retailers, with only the postage adding significantly to the price.

Browning the venison in oil

Browning the venison in oil

Ingredients (Two Servings)

  • 3/4 pounds diced venison
  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 1 green bell pepper
  • 1/2 red onion
  • 2 medium closed-cup mushrooms
  • 1/2 pint fresh beef stock
  • 1/2 pint red wine
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • Bay leaf
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • Flat-leafed parsley for garnish (optional)

Instructions

Venison is an extremely healthy option for the table as it is a meat very low in fat. The drawback in this respect, however, is that if it is not cooked properly and well, it can be extremely tough in texture.

  1. Pat the chunks of venison dry with some paper kitchen towel.
  2. Mix them through a couple of tablespoons of seasoned flour.
  3. Bring a tablespoon of olive oil up to medium heat in a large stew pot.
  4. Shake the excess flour off each piece of venison and add them to the pot.
  5. Stir for a couple of minutes to evenly brown and seal the meat.
  6. The two bell peppers should be quartered, de-seeded and cored. Each quarter should be halved across the way to form approximate 1" squares.
  7. The red onion should be halved again and split into leaves. All should be added to the browned venison and stirred around in the oil and juices for a couple of minutes.
  8. The red wine and stock should be added next, along with the bay leaf and the thyme. Season with salt and pepper but not too much, as the seasoning will be checked at the end of the cooking period.
  9. Bring the liquid to a gentle simmer and cover. Simmer for one and a half hours, stirring occasionally and ensuring that there remains plenty of liquid in the pot. The liquid in this recipe should not require topping up but if it does, add a little boiling water.
  10. After an hour and a half, I slice the mushrooms to a thickness of about a quarter-inch and add them to the stew. This is simply because I like them to retain a bit of body, rather than become too cooked down and mushy.
  11. The stew should be simmered for a further half-hour and is then ready to serve, with the chopped flat-leaf parsley as an optional garnish.

The venison stew can be served with potatoes, rice, or even simply as it is. I prefer, however, to serve it with garlic toast, as described further down this page.

Chopped bell peppers and red onion ready to be added to the venison

Chopped bell peppers and red onion ready to be added to the venison

Bring the beef stock and red wine to a simmer

Bring the beef stock and red wine to a simmer

Sliced mushrooms ready to be added to the venison stew

Sliced mushrooms ready to be added to the venison stew

Venison Stew with Red Wine, Bell Peppers and Mushrooms

Venison Stew with Red Wine, Bell Peppers and Mushrooms

How to Make Garlic Toast

This simple preparation can be made in minutes when the venison stew is actually ready.

A French-style breadstick should be sliced at a forty-five-degree angle to a thickness of one inch. The bread slices should be toasted on both sides under an overhead grill until beautifully golden.

A garlic clove should be peeled and very slightly crushed, simply to release the juices. As soon as the toast comes out from under the grill, the garlic clove should be rubbed over the top of each slice. The heat will cause its juices to permeate into the toast and give it a delicious, garlicky flavour.

The toast should, of course, be served immediately with a steaming bowl of the venison stew and eaten hot.

Slicing the bread for garlic toast

Slicing the bread for garlic toast

Serve the garlic toast with the venison stew

Serve the garlic toast with the venison stew

What is your preferred way of cooking venison?

Gordon Hamilton (author) from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom on January 11, 2012:

Hi, Midasfx. Thanks for the visit and comment. Hope you enjoy your meal! :)

Midasfx on January 11, 2012:

Venison is one of my favorite meats. Thanks for the recipe.

Gordon Hamilton (author) from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom on January 04, 2012:

Hello, missolive. Thank you very much for the visit, share and comment. I hope you enjoy this way of cooking venison, which is a particular favourite of mine.

Marisa Hammond Olivares from Texas on January 03, 2012:

spotted this recipe while on Stumble (will follow)

I have bookmarked it into my recipes file

Venison is very popular here. I'll be sure to share this with my friends.

Gordon Hamilton (author) from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom on March 09, 2011:

Hi, Phillip

Thanks for the visit and the comment. The principal secret with venison is quite simply long, slow cooking.

Hope you try the recipe and enjoy it as much as I did!

phillip goodson on March 09, 2011:

I have had bad experiences cooking venison, it's hard to get it too not turn out tough, next time I go deer hunting I'll try it your way. That stew looks great.

Gordon Hamilton (author) from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom on March 08, 2011:

Thanks, crystolite. Hope you try and enjoy it.

Emma from Houston TX on March 08, 2011:

Good stuff.thanks for sharing.

Gordon Hamilton (author) from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom on March 05, 2011:

Hi, Tony.

Thanks for the tip. I seem to remember hearing about juniper berries with game somewhere before but have never tried it. I'll definitely give it a go!

Gordon

Tony Mead from Yorkshire on March 05, 2011:

HI gordon

looks like another good recipe idea. I like Juniper berries with my game meats, as well the plant itself. try them coursly crushed with large grain sea salt.

cheers Tony

Gordon Hamilton (author) from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom on March 04, 2011:

Thanks, Jeff. Appreciate the visit and the comments.

Jeff Berndt from Southeast Michigan on March 04, 2011:

Great stuff, Gordon! Rated up and useful.

Gordon Hamilton (author) from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom on March 04, 2011:

Thanks, Brian. It's delicious - I hope you get the chance to try it.

Brian Slater from England on March 04, 2011:

Looks really good Gordon -I could eat that tonite.