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How to Make Garlic Honey and Oil

Garlic Honey

Homemade Garlic Honey
Homemade Garlic Honey | Source

Garlic Honey Recipe

Garlic honey is an effective treatment when you feel a cold or flu coming on. The risk of botulism is lower with garlic honey than with garlic oil. It is still advised to store your honey in the fridge.

Ingredients:

  • 1 small jar

  • I bulb of garlic

  • Organic raw honey to fill jar

Instructions:

  1. Peel the white skin away from the bulb. Separate the cloves and peel them.
  2. Cut them into halves or quarter and fill the small jar with them.
  3. Pour the honey over the cloves. With a wooden stick or the back of a spoon, release any trapped air bubbles from the honey.
  4. Continue to fill until jar is full. Leave 1-inch of head space at the top.
  5. Let the honey and garlic steep in the honey for 6-12 hours. You will know that it is ready because the honey will begin to look more like syrup then honey.
  6. Strain the honey from the jar and cap, label and date the jar.

The normal dose for an adult is 1 teaspoon 2-3 times a day. For children ¼ to ½ teaspoon 1 to 2 two times a day.

Never give garlic honey to a child under the age of one. Raw Honey increases the chance of infant botulism. The garlic can upset their stomach and cause distress.

Garlic Bulb

Garlic Oil Recipe

Remember when making garlic oil that it runs the risk of contracting botulism. Botulism is a serious condition. It's brought about by the toxin called Clostridium botulinum. There are three main forms of botulism: food-borne, wound botulism, and infant botulism. All three are dangerous and can be fatal.

When making garlic oil it is best to use right away and store your left overs in the fridge.

Ingredients:

  • 1 small jar

  • 1 bulb of garlic

  • Extra Virgin Olive oil to fill the jar

Instructions:

  1. Peel the white skin from your garlic bulb. Then break all the bulbs off and peel them.
  2. Cut the bulbs in quarters and place in the small jar.
  3. Fill the jar with oil and using a wooden stick or spoon release any trapped air bubbles.
  4. Cap the jar and allow it to steep for 2-4 hours.
  5. Take the cloves out and cap, label, date and store in fridge. Use within a few days.

Garlic oil is good used in cooking or for treating ear infections. A few drops in the ear canal with help ease the pain and treat the infection. You can also add a few drops of garlic oil to a cotton ball. Then place the cotton ball in the ear if the idea of placing the oil in the canal bothers you.

Do not ever use garlic oil in the ear canal if there is any discharge coming from the ear or if you suspect that the ear drum has ruptured.

Garlic (Allium sativum)

Parts used: The bulb.

Anatomy: Garlic is usually first recognised by its strong odor. It is the most common used kitchen spice, and it is easily found and grown all over the world. Garlic is a perennial plant that is best started in the fall. In the spring when it starts to emerge, the stem appears. The stem is green in color and is simple, round, and smooth. The base of the plant is surrounded with tubular leaf sheaths. The leaf sheaths are long and flat. The tops flower. The flower bulbs starts with a tear drop looking bulb that blooms into small white flowers. The flowers then fall off the plant. The root is the bulb, and it's the part that of the plant used in the recipes that follow. It is compound, meaning lots of bulbs enclosed together. The bulbs are encased and protected by a white skin.

Garlic Legends

The history of garlic goes as far back as our most early ancestors. The ancient Egyptians would make oaths on garlic. It was valuable enough to the Egyptians that they could use garlic as form of money. King Tut's tomb had garlic scattered round him and the rooms when it was found .

The Greeks believed that garlic could drive away all the evil things that roamed the nights. They would leave garlic at crossroads for the goddess Hecate. It was believed that the evil spirits would lose their way, making your passage safe. Greek midwives would string garlic in birthing rooms. This was done to keep evil away and protect the laboring mother and child.

Romans believed that is would strengthen soldiers; so before battle, they would eat garlic. After the battle was over, they would plant fields of garlic in the new territory. Roman generals believed that the soldiers' courage and bravery would transfer to the soil.

In European culture, garlic was viewed as a powerful protective plant. It was believed to protect from devils, werewolves, vampires, and all evil entities. It was worn around the neck to protect them and hung in windows and doorways to keep evil out.

Garlic was also valued by the Vikings. The Vikings took large amounts of garlic with them on every voyage. When they came home from their raids, they would bring this plant back with them. The Vikings praised this herb for its both medical and spiritual qualities. By 1000 A.D, garlic was being grown in every part of the known world.

Garlic is also a main ingredient in the legendary "Four Thieves" vinegar recipe. Thieves allegedly developed and used this recipe to keep from contracting the bubonic plague. It supposedly kept them safe as they looted the homes and the bodies of dead.

It's believed that if you dream of having garlic in the house that this is a lucky omen. To dream of eating garlic means you will soon discover hidden secrets and treasure.

Garlic Medicinal Uses

Properties:

  • Anthelmintic

  • Antispasmodic

  • Carminative

  • Cholagogue

  • Digestive

  • Diuretic

  • Expectorant

  • Febrifuge

  • Antifungal

  • Antibacterial

  • Antiseptic

Garlic works to help the body in so many ways. It's used to stimulate digestion and helps to regulate liver and gall bladder function. It is effective in treating bronchitis, colds, and flus, as well as sore throats. It's used to treat any and all types of infections. Including intestinal infections, like dysentery, cholera, and typhoid. It is also used to treat worms, especially pinworms.

Garlic is used for treating all conditions that deal with the heart and blood. Garlic has shown to lower cholesterol levels and improve circulation throughout the body. Some doctors will tell patients to include garlic in their diet.

Garlic is one of the few herbs that is just as effective in its powdered form as it is raw. The thing to remember is that heating garlic can cause it to lose its healing benefits. The hotter you cook your garlic the more healing qualities are destroyed. When using garlic to treat anything, it is best to keep use it raw. Or add it to cooking just as it is coming off the stove or out of the oven.

Small amounts can even be added to salves to help speed the healing of minor cuts and wounds. Just be careful as it could irritate sensitive skin. See warning below.

Warning: Garlic is considered a safe plant with little to no drug interactions. Too much at one time can cause heartburn and/or stomach distress. Especially in those that have sensitive stomachs, like small children and infants. Nursing mothers should avoid too much garlic or limit their intake of garlic. It can make babies fussy and colicky. It can also irritate sensitive skin if applied directly.

Medical Properties of Garlic

Properties:

  • Anthelmintic

  • Antispasmodic

  • Carminative

  • Cholagogue

  • Digestive

  • Diuretic

  • Expectorant

  • Febrifuge

  • Antifungal

  • Antibacterial

  • Antiseptic

“Eat leeks in March and Garlic in May, the rest of the year, your doctor can play.

— Old Welsh

Sources

The Herb Book, John Lust; Benedict Lust Publications; ISBN: 0-87904-055-6

Medicinal Herbs, A Beginner’s Guide, Rosemary Gladstar; Storey Publishing; ISBN: 978-1-61212-005-8

Dr. Christopher Herbal Legacy: http://www.herballegacy.com/Motteshard_History.html

Mayo Clinic, Botulism: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/botulism/basics/definition/con-20025875

Garlic Honey

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