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How to Grind Up Fresh, Organic Rosemary And Greek Oregano

I love grinding up fresh oregano and rosemary, they both taste so much better than the stuff you can get from the store.

Rosemary and Greek oregano in a bowl I made.

Rosemary and Greek oregano in a bowl I made.

Do you have any rosemary and/or Greek oregano growing in your garden? People spend lots of money to buy ground-up herbs at the grocery store, so why not make your own for a lot less? I love the scent of rosemary and oregano, so I decided to grind up some fresh sprigs that had been drying for a few days in a beautiful bowl I made in a pottery class.

There is something fragrant and soothing about grinding your own fresh herbs, and it will make you excited to experiment with new dishes in the kitchen. Of course, there will be someone who will throw out the cliché phrase "I do not have time to do that," but then in the next breath, the same person will take about a show they are going to watch or another hobby they want to participate in.

So grinding fresh herbs might seem pointless and time-consuming for people who want to spend their time doing other things, but it can be quite rewarding for people who enjoy cooking and spending time in the kitchen.

Cook Time

Prep timeReady inYields

1 hour

1 hour

About a pound of fresh rosemary and oregano.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 Pound Dried Organic Rosemary
  • 1/2 Pound Dried Organic Oregano

Grind Up Those Herbs

  1. Pick some organic rosemary and oregano from the garden. Allow it to dry for a few days.
  2. Allow it to dry for a few days.
  3. Take the rosemary and oregano leaves off of the branches after drying.
  4. Use a coffee grinder, which can double as an herb grinder, to shred up the rosemary and oregano. You can be as precise or mix it up like I did. I simply mixed the two herbs together.
  5. Only grind a few herbs as at a time since it will overwork the motor when too much is put inside at one time.
  6. Grind the herbs to the desired consistency. I ground the herbs pretty finally, but a few patches were a bit more roughly chopped than others. Overall, my rosemary and Greek oregano was chopped pretty fine.
  7. Store the ground up rosemary an Greek oregano in a canning jar or container of your choice. Ground up herbs just look cool in old canning jars, and I find it is easier to spoon out what I need rather than using messy shakers.

Read More From Delishably

Step-By-Step Photos

It takes awhile to take all the herbs off the branches to grind, especially when you have a pound worth of herbs.

It takes awhile to take all the herbs off the branches to grind, especially when you have a pound worth of herbs.

Start by just grinding a few herbs.

Start by just grinding a few herbs.

Try grinding a few more herbs if you feel comfortable, but do not overload the grinder.

Try grinding a few more herbs if you feel comfortable, but do not overload the grinder.

Finely ground rosemary and Greek oregano looks beautiful in a canning jar.

Finely ground rosemary and Greek oregano looks beautiful in a canning jar.

It took about an hour to grind up the organic rosemary and Greek oregano, but the effort was worth it. People pay quite a bit of money to purchase organic ground herbs at the store, so why not make your own! I love grinding fresh herbs from my mom's garden, and these definitely compliment the lovely dishes I like to make from scratch. If you are investing the time in making a lovely soup or homemade mash potatoes, I assure you these will taste much better with freshly ground rosemary.

The texture of the finely ground rosemary and Greek oregano was not uniform since I pulsed some batches more than others.

The texture of the finely ground rosemary and Greek oregano was not uniform since I pulsed some batches more than others.

© 2014 SweetiePie

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