Making Homemade Corn Silk Spice

Updated on August 4, 2018
VVanNess profile image

Victoria is a stay-at-home mom, author, blogger at Healthy at Home, and educator. She currently lives in Colorado with her family.

Source

The long shiny fibers at the top of your ears of corn are called corn silk. Interesting fact: There is one strand of corn silk for every corn kernel on the ear of corn. Each one is responsible to drawing food into the kernel it's connected to. These little babies are packed full of awesome nutrients, and yet everyone just throws them away once they've got their corn cob out.

As we were shucking corn this week to can it, we had tons of husks, and silk, along with our cobs. We've been working on not having any food waste at our house, but using every bit that we could from the food that we purchased or grew. It was time to figure out how to use this delicate part of the corn. With the husks and cobs, I made corn broth, and with the leaves that we could keep intact, we made tamales.

It turns out that corn silk is actually made into corn silk capsules and sold at the store as vitamins. This I did not know until this morning. I happened to find an article that told me how it could be dried and made into a spice to be added to your recipes, just like any of your other spices. There was no recipe for me to follow, but it sounded like it was worth a shot. I hated to just toss it.

So that's how Corn Silk Spice got started in the Van Ness household. I now have a little jar of it in my spice cabinet alongside my flaxseed, wheat bran and chia seeds, to be tossed in anywhere that seemed appropriate. Now you can benefit too, as now youw ill have a recipe to follow; the only one on the internet it seems. I hope you enjoy it! Let's see how to do it yourself.

5 stars from 2 ratings of Homemade Corn Silk Spice

Ingredients

  • silk from 16 corn cobs

Instructions

  1. To gather the silk from your corn cobs, it's best to carefully remove all of the leaves of the husk surrounding the corn cob without disturbing the long shiny white fibers of silk on the inside.
  2. Once all of the leaves have been removed, you can grip the bundle of silk at the top with one hand and the corn cob with the other, and pull gently to separate them. Pull off any additional fibers and place them aside with your bundles.
  3. When you're ready to make your spice, start by cutting off the brown sticky tops from each of your bundles.
  4. Lay each of them gently in your dehydrator trays, spreading them out so they get dehydrated evenly. (I'm sure this could even be done in the sun on cookie sheets, or very carefully in the oven on its lowest setting.)
  5. Set your dehydrator to fruit and vegetables and turn it on.
  6. Dry your silk for as long as needed until it is no longer soft and wet; at least 24 hours.
  7. When dry, transfer your dried bundles to the bucket of your food processor, and process down as fine as possible.
  8. Pour into a glass jar, label the lid and seal. Your spice should last indefinitely.
Click thumbnail to view full-size
(Veggie scraps from shucking corn)As I shucked the corn, I separated out all of the silk into its own bowl.When you're ready to use your silk, lay each bundle out on a towel.Cut the brown, sticky ends off.And what you're left with is just good silk to dehydrate.I have two different dehydrators. One jut turns on, and one has different settings for what you're dehydrating.Lay out your silk on the dehydrator trays.Either turn on or set your dehydrator to fruit and vegetables and then turn on. Dry for at least 24 hours until your silk is no longer wet.When it's dry, it's time to process it.Place it all in your food processor bucket.And process until it's as tiny as you can get it.Pour it into a small glass jar.Label and seal it.
(Veggie scraps from shucking corn)
(Veggie scraps from shucking corn)
As I shucked the corn, I separated out all of the silk into its own bowl.
As I shucked the corn, I separated out all of the silk into its own bowl.
When you're ready to use your silk, lay each bundle out on a towel.
When you're ready to use your silk, lay each bundle out on a towel.
Cut the brown, sticky ends off.
Cut the brown, sticky ends off.
And what you're left with is just good silk to dehydrate.
And what you're left with is just good silk to dehydrate.
I have two different dehydrators. One jut turns on, and one has different settings for what you're dehydrating.
I have two different dehydrators. One jut turns on, and one has different settings for what you're dehydrating.
Lay out your silk on the dehydrator trays.
Lay out your silk on the dehydrator trays.
Either turn on or set your dehydrator to fruit and vegetables and then turn on. Dry for at least 24 hours until your silk is no longer wet.
Either turn on or set your dehydrator to fruit and vegetables and then turn on. Dry for at least 24 hours until your silk is no longer wet.
When it's dry, it's time to process it.
When it's dry, it's time to process it.
Place it all in your food processor bucket.
Place it all in your food processor bucket.
And process until it's as tiny as you can get it.
And process until it's as tiny as you can get it.
Pour it into a small glass jar.
Pour it into a small glass jar.
Label and seal it.
Label and seal it.
Nutrition Facts
Serving size: 100
% Daily Value *
Fat 5 g8%
Carbohydrates 69 g23%
Protein 9 g18%
Sodium 11 mg
* The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, so your values may change depending on your calorie needs. The values here may not be 100% accurate because the recipes have not been professionally evaluated nor have they been evaluated by the U.S. FDA.
Source

Health Benefits of Corn Silk

"Corn silk is used for bladder infections, inflammation of the urinary system, inflammation of the prostate, kidney stones, and bedwetting. It is also used to treat congestive heart failure, diabetes, high blood pressure, fatigue, and high cholesterol levels."

How does it work?

"Corn silk contains proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. It also contains chemicals which might work like water pills (diuretics), and it might alter blood sugar levels, and help reduce inflammation."

It is great for healing your bladder and urinary tract, and "it helps flush out excess water and waste from the body," which helps your body heal a number of diseases like congestive heart failure and kidney diseases. "Corn silk has an antioxidant named maysin that battles oxidative stress and prevents the onset of certain types of cancer. [And] a Korean study published in 2014 stated that maysin has immunity booster properties."

It is said that soaking in a corn silk tea bath can help with skin pigmentation issues, balance the mineral levels in your body, and even help with eczema and edema.

If you'd like to use it for corn silk tea...

Ingredients

  • Dried corn silk, chopped
  • Water
  • Honey

Instructions

  1. This method does not need boiling.
  2. Pour some water in a glass jar with a lid.
  3. Add the dried silk corn in the water.
  4. Put on the lid and then keep the jar out in the sun for an entire day.
  5. At the end of the day, bring the jar inside and add some honey to it and stir well.
  6. Keep it in the refrigerator and serve chilled.

Honestly, it was super easy to make and I look forward to the health benefits from it that are to follow. I also really like knowing that we are not wasting valuable parts of the plants we are purchasing and growing in our back yard this way. I will have a couple articles following on using vegetable scraps to make veggie broth, using the husks and corn cobs from these ears of corn to make tons of yummy corn broth, and even how to use items like banana peels, orange and lemon peels and peach and cherry pits in your household.

Stay tuned for some awesome articles to come.

Questions & Answers

    © 2018 Victoria Van Ness

    Comments

      0 of 8192 characters used
      Post Comment

      • Ericdierker profile image

        Eric Dierker 

        4 months ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

        Thanks. We will get on it.

      • VVanNess profile imageAUTHOR

        Victoria Van Ness 

        4 months ago from Fountain, CO

        You definitely can! I like to can most of my items because they don't require any energy to store, I can put them down in the basement and keep them for as long as I'd like in storage, and they don't take up freezer space. But yes, you can certainly freeze your corn cobs as well as your kernels!

      • Ericdierker profile image

        Eric Dierker 

        4 months ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

        I studied this rather than just reading. I am going to do the chilled honey one as I just love pure, raw, unfiltered and unpasteurized honey. Just wondering if I can freeze corn kernals? Store canned is way to salty/sodium.

      working

      This website uses cookies

      As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, delishably.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

      For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://delishably.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

      Show Details
      Necessary
      HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
      LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
      Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
      AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
      Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
      CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
      Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
      Features
      Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
      Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
      Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
      Marketing
      Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
      Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
      Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
      Statistics
      Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
      ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)