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Garden Buddha Bowl: GF, Vegan, and Endlessly Customizable

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Leah loves cooking and enjoys finding methods on how to spruce up traditional recipes.

Garden Buddha Bowl

Garden Buddha Bowl

Eating Vegan

Buddha bowls are one of my favorite vegan dinners to make, since they’re so flexible and come together so easily. There really aren't any rules when it comes to making them, but they tend to include a variety of food groups. Buddha bowls are often used as a whole meal, and they're fast and healthy to make. They're endlessly customizable, so they never get boring.

I’ve recently switched to eating vegan in an effort to improve my health, since literally nothing else I have tried seems to help. Fingers crossed! Even if you aren't vegan, eating a meatless meal each week may have a beneficial impact on your health and on the planet. If you're dead set against a plant-based meal, you can always add in whatever type of protein you like in addition to the regular ingredients.

Gardening

A lot of people seem to have taken up growing vegetables in home gardens during the lockdown this year. I manage to kill all plants just by looking at them, but my mom and brother seem to be doing great with managing a garden.

They've maintained a super bountiful garden in our yard this year that produces the most delicious vegetables, which I can incorporate into recipes on a regular basis. This recipe makes use of two types of vegetables that we grew in our garden (which automatically makes them taste better, in my opinion). We've had a huge surplus of squash and broccoli this year, so I've been busy trying to find ways to incorporate them into recipes. Lately, we're drowning in tomatoes, so I'm going to have to do something with those as well.

What Is a Buddha Bowl?

If you don’t know what a Buddha bowl is, it is basically a whole plant-based meal served in a single bowl. It doesn’t have to follow a set formula, but generally includes some sort of grain, some sort of plant-based protein, and a variety of vegetables. However, since I was cooking for myself and my mom who follows a low-carb diet, I didn’t put in grains and substituted cauliflower rice. Man, I really love that stuff. Don’t worry though, I’ll include a bunch of substitution ideas at the bottom.

I always use a little oil in my cooking to help my body better absorb the nutrients from the vegetables, and a lot of times I'll top my Buddha bowls with some kind of seeds—sunflower seeds or pumpkin seeds to add some extra protein and nutrients.

Cook Time

Prep timeCook timeReady inYields

15 min

30 min

45 min

4 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 squash, diced
  • 1 (15-oz) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 2 cups broccoli florets
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons cumin
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon hot paprika
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon black pepper

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 450F.
  2. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil.
  3. Place the diced squash, chickpeas, and broccoli florets in a gallon ziplock bag with the olive oil and seasonings.
  4. Seal the bag and massage the contents together to ensure that seasonings are evenly distributed.
  5. Pour everything out into a single layer onto the baking sheet. Roast for 30 minutes.
  6. While the vegetables are cooking, prepare 4 servings of whichever base you want to serve—quinoa, rice, cauliflower rice, greens, etc.

Photo Guide

Place the diced squash, chickpeas, and broccoli florets in a gallon ziplock bag.

Place the diced squash, chickpeas, and broccoli florets in a gallon ziplock bag.

Add the olive oil and seasonings. Seal the bag and massage the contents together to ensure that seasonings are evenly distributed.

Add the olive oil and seasonings. Seal the bag and massage the contents together to ensure that seasonings are evenly distributed.

Pour everything out into a single layer onto the baking sheet. Roast for 30 minutes.

Pour everything out into a single layer onto the baking sheet. Roast for 30 minutes.

Substitutions

I always like to include some changes that you can make to a recipe. I just included the basics for this, but it should be put over a base. You can put anything you want under this—any grain you like, cauliflower rice, greens, sweet potatoes, any of them would be delicious. Here are some ideas that I came up with:

  • Carbs: This would go well over rice, quinoa, or even sweet potatoes.
  • Vegetables: Onions, cauliflower, carrots, bell peppers, Brussels sprouts, or basically any other veggie that you want to add would fit right into this recipe.
  • Spices: I picked up some hot paprika when I was on vacation in Israel, but if you can’t find this, you can try some regular paprika with some chili powder.
  • Toppings: I’m one of those people who believe that avocado basically belongs on most things, so I think it would be the perfect topping on this dish. If you like a little kick, spicy pepitas (pumpkin seeds) can also increase the protein content and amp up the spiciness of the dish.

© 2020 Leah

Comments

Leah (author) from New York on August 07, 2020:

That’s the beauty of a Buddha bowl - you can add whatever you’d like! I hope you enjoy it Abby!

Abby Slutsky from America on August 06, 2020:

I would probablly add a protein to this, but it looks delicious. Thanks for sharing.

Leah (author) from New York on August 05, 2020:

I hope you enjoy it!

Danny from India on August 05, 2020:

I love salads that have a fusion of different exotic ingredients in it. Your recipe with broccoli made my day. I will surely try it myself

Thank Leah for sharing it.