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Asparagus and Brussels Sprouts Salad With Parmesan Recipe

Efficient Admin (a.k.a. Michelle) enjoys healthy cooking, and she has all of her salad and stew recipes memorized.

Asparagus and Brussels sprouts salad with Parmesan: flavorful and very healthy!

Asparagus and Brussels sprouts salad with Parmesan: flavorful and very healthy!

I must admit, I don't eat enough vegetables in my diet. But every time I have some Brussels sprouts and/or asparagus, I always remember how much I love both of these veggies—and so I decided to combine these two vitamin-packed powerhouses into one dish!

Both of these vegetables are beneficial to any diet. You can make them extra tasty when you combine them with Parmesan cheese.

Another delicious way to enjoy these vegetables is to coat them in some olive oil (about one tablespoon), salt and pepper, garlic powder, and onion powder and roast them in the oven at 425 degrees for about 30-35 minutes.

Cook Time

Prep timeCook timeReady inYields

20 min

15 min

35 min

4 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 cup water
  • 1 pound fresh Brussels sprouts, trimmed
  • 2 bundles fresh asparagus, cut into 3-inch pieces
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 3/4 cup Parmesan cheese
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • I Can't Believe It's Not Butter spray

Instructions

  1. Cut the stems off of the Brussels sprouts and remove the outer leaves (these cause bitterness). Cut the asparagus into 3-4-inch pieces and discard the woody stems (at the very bottom of the stem).
  2. Add 1 cup of water to a pot.
  3. To the pot, add the Brussels sprouts first and then lay the asparagus on top. Then add the minced garlic. Cover. Turn heat up to bring the water to a boil.
  4. Once the water is boiling, turn the heat down to a simmer, still covered, for 10-15 minutes. I like mine to be al dente and this amount took 15 minutes to get that way. Keep checking every 8 minutes or so until the vegetables are cooked to your liking.
  5. Once the vegetables are cooked to your liking, pour the contents of the pot into a strainer to drain the cooking water.
  6. Once drained, add the vegetables back into the pot. Then add the butter, lemon juice, and cheese. Cover until the cheese melts.
  7. Once the cheese melts, stir everything together in the pot. Add salt and pepper to taste. If you like some extra butter flavor but don't want the calories, spray as much "I Can't Believe It's Not Butter" spray until your heart is content. It is ready to serve. Enjoy!
Step 1. Cut the stems off of the Brussels sprouts and remove the outer leaves (these cause bitterness). Cut the asparagus into 3-4-inch pieces and discard the woody stems (at the very bottom of the stem).

Step 1. Cut the stems off of the Brussels sprouts and remove the outer leaves (these cause bitterness). Cut the asparagus into 3-4-inch pieces and discard the woody stems (at the very bottom of the stem).

Step 5. Once vegetables are cooked to your liking, pour the contents of the pot into a strainer to drain the cooking water.

Step 5. Once vegetables are cooked to your liking, pour the contents of the pot into a strainer to drain the cooking water.

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Step 6. Once drained, add the vegetables back into the pot. Then add the butter, lemon juice, and cheese. Cover until the cheese melts.

Step 6. Once drained, add the vegetables back into the pot. Then add the butter, lemon juice, and cheese. Cover until the cheese melts.

Final Steps

Once the cheese melts, mix all of the ingredients together and it is ready to serve. Add salt and pepper to taste, and if you prefer, a spritz or two of "I Can't Believe It's Not Butter." Enjoy!

Keep in Mind

  • Canned asparagus contains a large amount of added salt.
  • People with goiter should not eat too much from the brassica family. Some glucosinolates in brassicas break down into isothiocyanates, which prevents the thyroid gland from absorbing iodine.

Benefits of Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are part of the "brassica" family of vegetables, which also includes cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, turnips, bok choy, and rutubaga. They are rich in folate, vitamin C, and antioxidants. A three-ounce serving of most brassicas supply over 68% of an adult's total daily vitamin C requirement.

Choose small sprouts; they have a better flavor than large ones. Keep in a cool, dark place to conserve nutrients, flavor, and texture.

Benefits of Asparagus

Asparagus, a member of the lily family, is a good source of vitamin B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin), folic acid, fiber, potassium. Potassium is a trace element and is needed for maintaining good water balance in the body. Asparagus is also low in fat and sodium.

In season from March to June, the freshest asparagus will have straight, bright green stalks with firm tips. Buy fresh locally grown, and eat the day you buy them.

Benefits of Garlic

Archaeological evidence indicates that garlic has been cultivated in Central Asia since at least 3000 BC. It is a member of the onion family.

Choose plump, unbruised bulbs that are neither soft and soggy, nor starting to dry. Avoid torn skins and bulbs with sprouts. Keep for several weeks in a dry place where air can circulate, and away from other vegetables.

© 2012 Michelle Dee

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