Skip to main content

Cooking With Carrots: 3 Recipes From Savory to Sweet

My husband and I both enjoy cooking, visiting local restaurants, and exploring food from all over the world.

Colorful and nutritious carrots

Colorful and nutritious carrots

Nutrient-Dense Carrots

My grandfather always had several huge gardens when I was a youngster. Growing carrots was a staple, along with his many other vegetables and flowers. Thus we always had a good supply of them year-round due to my parent's root cellar and my mother's canning and preservation of food practices.

I learned from a young age that consuming carrots was good for one's eyes. But there are many other health benefits associated with the consumption of carrots. They are low in calories yet high in fiber which aids digestion. They are a good source of vitamins and minerals along with antioxidants.

If a person wishes to lose weight, strengthen bones, lower cholesterol, have improved immune function, and reduce heart disease and possibly even cancer, adding carrots to one's diet can help. Many reliable sources share proof of that and more. In addition to all of that, they taste good!

I'll now share some recipes that we enjoy using carrots as one of the ingredients. I will add more recipes in the future, but I will start with soup, salad, and dessert.

A serving of delicious carrot vichyssoise in a cup topped with snipped chives

A serving of delicious carrot vichyssoise in a cup topped with snipped chives

Recipe #1: Carrot Vichyssoise

We own a beautiful cookbook authored by Mary and Vincent Price. The carrot vichyssoise was on a menu at The Four Seasons, and Chef Albert Stockli graciously shared the recipe displayed on page 264 of this 488-page cookbook with the Prices.

My husband lightened the carrot vichyssoise recipe by using half-and-half instead of heavy cream. He uses chicken broth in place of chicken stock. He also garnishes the cold soup with snipped chives instead of shredded carrots.

Additional notations by my husband are to let the flavors blend for 24 hours before serving. This recipe can easily be doubled or tripled.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 1 1/4 cups carrots, sliced
  • 1 leek, sliced (white part only)
  • 3 cups chicken broth
  • 1 cup half-and-half
  • Salt and white pepper, to taste
  • Chives, for garnish

Instructions

  1. Put the first four ingredients into a saucepan. Bring to a boil and simmer until the vegetables are tender, approximately 25 minutes.
  2. Puree the mixture in batches in a blender until very smooth. Empty into a mixing bowl.
  3. Stir in the Half and Half. Add salt and white pepper to taste.
  4. Chill for at least 24 hours for maximum flavor development.
  5. Garnish with snipped chives.
A serving of copper pennies on a lettuce leaf

A serving of copper pennies on a lettuce leaf

Recipe #2: Copper Pennies

The first time I got to eat this copper pennies dish was at my mother-in-law's home in San Antonio. We must have asked for the recipe. She wrote it down on a small piece of stationery, which is how we have chosen to keep it in her handwriting. Copper pennies make a tasty cold salad or even side dish accompaniment to a meal.

According to her notes, the marinated copper pennies can be kept refrigerated for a long time and even freezes well.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds carrots, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 1 medium sweet onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 green pepper, thinly sliced
  • 1 cup celery, thinly sliced
  • 1 cup canned tomato soup
  • 1 scant cup sugar
  • 3/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1/2 cup canola oil, or salad oil of your choice
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard, or mustard of your choice
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. Cook the carrots in a small amount of water until tender. Drain and cool.
  2. Place a layer of carrots, onions, green pepper, and celery in a bowl. Salt and pepper that layer. Continue layering and seasoning until all the vegetables are in the bowl.
  3. Combine and mix the rest of the ingredients in another bowl. Pour over the vegetables and refrigerate.
  4. Stir the mixture each time before serving.

Recipe #3: Carrot Cake

The original recipe, from which my version comes, had the name orange-glazed carrot cake. To cut some of the calories, I skipped the glaze. I also used half whole wheat flour instead of all white flour, cut back on the sugar, used walnuts instead of pecans, and added some nutmeg. The cake is moist and delicious! It also freezes well.

Ingredients

  • 1 3/4 cups sugar
  • 1 1/4 cups canola oil
  • 1 cup all purpose flour
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 4 eggs
  • 3 cups grated carrots
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts

Instructions

  1. Thoroughly combine the sugar and canola oil in a large mixing bowl.
  2. Sift together all of the dry ingredients.
  3. Add half of the dry ingredients to the sugar mixture and blend.
  4. Alternate the remaining dry ingredients with the eggs, adding the eggs one at a time and beating well after each addition.
  5. Stir in the grated carrots and walnuts.
  6. Pour the mixture into a lightly oiled 10-inch tube pan.
  7. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 70 minutes or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.
  8. Let the cake cool before removing it from the tube pan.
 Following my grandfather's example, I once had a large garden in Wisconsin, and I also grew carrots plus many other items.  We shared much of what I harvested with our neighbors and friends in the area.  You can see a portion of that garden here.

Following my grandfather's example, I once had a large garden in Wisconsin, and I also grew carrots plus many other items. We shared much of what I harvested with our neighbors and friends in the area. You can see a portion of that garden here.

"That would be cool if you could eat a good food with a bad food and the good food would cover for the bad food when it got to your stomach. Like you could eat a carrot with an onion ring and they would travel down to your stomach, then they would get there, and the carrot would say, It's cool, he's with me."

— Mitch Hedberg

Sources

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2022 Peggy Woods