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How to Cook Parsnips and Some Delicious Recipes

Updated on March 17, 2016
Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon loves cooking and experimenting with food. He loves making new dishes, particularly with unusual or under used ingredients.

Roast Chicken Leg Portions, Parsnips and Assorted Root Vegetables (recipe included below)
Roast Chicken Leg Portions, Parsnips and Assorted Root Vegetables (recipe included below)

Parsnips are not only delicious to eat, they are extremely versatile in the different ways in which they can be cooked and served. Although parsnips can be simply peeled or scraped and poached in boiling, salted water until soft, a little experimentation will pay huge dividends in terms of flavour and the enjoyment which can be had from this sweet and delicious root vegetable. This page will look at a number of different ways to cook parsnips, as well as providing options for serving the parsnips in each instance. Read on to find recipes for parsnip mash, roasted parsnips with chicken, parsnips in a Winter beef stew - and even parsnips roasted in Scotch whisky marmalade...

Fresh parsnips
Fresh parsnips

Potato and Parsnip Mash Recipe with Steak and Kidney Pie

Pie and mash is spiced up a little by the addition of parsnip to the mashed potato
Pie and mash is spiced up a little by the addition of parsnip to the mashed potato
Potato and parsnip of similar sizes are used per serving
Potato and parsnip of similar sizes are used per serving
Potato and parsnip are peeled, chopped and added to cold, salted water
Potato and parsnip are peeled, chopped and added to cold, salted water
Potato and parsnip are mashed with butter and white pepper
Potato and parsnip are mashed with butter and white pepper
The potato and parsnip mash is spooned on to the plate beside the meat pie and some boiled carrots
The potato and parsnip mash is spooned on to the plate beside the meat pie and some boiled carrots

Pie and mash is a concept which knows its popular origins in 19th century London. In those days, the pies were usually made with eels from the River Thames but in modern times - although eel pies with mash are still to be found in some of the remaining pie and mash shops - beef is probably the more common filling for the pies. This recipe focuses on the mash, which is made to include parsnip along with the potato for a little extra flavour. The pie is that other traditional British favourite, steak and kidney.

The nature of this dish means that the recipe should be simple and straightforward. Allow one medium to large potato and a similar sized parsnip per person. Peel both and chop them to approximately one inch cubes. Add them to a large pot of cold, slightly salted water and place the pot on a high heat until the water reaches a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for twenty to twenty-five minutes until they are just softened.

Drain the vegetables through a colander and return them to the empty pot. Add about an ounce of butter and season with white (not black) pepper. It is important when making authentic mash to use a traditional, hand masher. Using a food processor or blender makes for puree rather than mash and the final effect is all wrong. Mash the potato and parsnip just enough to eliminate any lumps.

The individual steak and kidney pie in this recipe was bought from the butcher's already cooked. It required only to be heated in the oven - preheated to 400F/200C - for twenty minutes. The carrot was scraped, sliced in to quarter inch thick discs and poached in salted water for ten minutes.

Plate the pie, spoon the mash alongside in a rustic pile and drain and add the carrots last of all.

Parsnip and Carrot Mash with Chopped Parsley

Pie and mash with a big difference - the mash is carrot and parsnip
Pie and mash with a big difference - the mash is carrot and parsnip
The parsnip and carrot should be mashed before the parsley is added
The parsnip and carrot should be mashed before the parsley is added
The mash is plated alongside the pie and the peas are added to the plate
The mash is plated alongside the pie and the peas are added to the plate

This is just a slight variation on the pie and mash recipe above, to make it a little bit more colourful and perhaps more appealing to many tastes. The potato is eliminated and it is one medium carrot and one medium parsnip per person which are used to prepare the mash.

Peel both the carrot and parsnip and again add them to salted cold water which should be brought to a boil. Fifteen to twenty minutes will be enough to soften them, after which they should be drained and mashed with butter and white pepper. A little bit of chopped, flat leafed parsley is stirred through after mashing. Be sure only to add the parsley at the end, or it will become stuck in the tines of the masher.

The pie is heated exactly as before and as the carrot is now incorporated in the mash, peas are served as the final accompaniment. These are frozen peas, which were simply heated in simmering water for three minutes before being drained and plated.

Whisky Marmalade Roasted Parsnips with Spicy Cottage Pie

The whisky marmalade roast parsnips are served with a portion of cottage pie and blanched green beans
The whisky marmalade roast parsnips are served with a portion of cottage pie and blanched green beans

Cottage Pie has gone through many changes and developments since its first recorded appearance in the late 18th century. It was originally a basic meat, potato and root vegetable dish, enjoyed by the poor as a means of using up what foodstuffs they had available. Parsnips are a very popular addition to a cottage pie and this recipe includes them both in the pie, as well as oven roasted in a homemade whisky marmalade as a pie accompaniment.

The beef is firstly browned in a dry pot
The beef is firstly browned in a dry pot
Vegetable ingredients of the cottage pie
Vegetable ingredients of the cottage pie
Carrot and parsnip are peeled and chopped to a medium dice
Carrot and parsnip are peeled and chopped to a medium dice

How to Make Cottage Pie

This cottage pie will - perhaps surprisingly - provide three to four decent portions from a mere half pound of minced/ground beef.

Ingredients

1/2lb minced/ground beef
1 large parsnip
1 large carrot
½ large white onion
½ tsp dried chilli flakes (optional)
Boiling water
3 large baking potatoes
1oz butter
2 tbsp milk
Salt and white pepper

Method

Peel and chop the potatoes in to one inch chunks. Place them in to a pot and add enough cold water to comfortably cover them, seasoning lightly with salt. Bring to a boil and simmer for twenty minutes.

When the potatoes are on, put the beef in to a large pot and season. Gently brown and seal on a low heat, stirring with a wooden spoon. Add the finely sliced onion and chilli flakes (if desired) and stir around for another few minutes until the onion turns translucent. The parsnip and carrot should be peeled and chopped and added to the pot with enough boiling water to just cover the mixture and no more. Simmer for ten minutes.

The vegetables should be just slightly softened at this stage. It is important not to overcook them as they are still to be baked in the oven. Switch the heat off, put the lid on the pot and leave to cool.

Drain the potatoes and return to the pot with the butter and milk. Season with salt and white pepper. Mash, cover and again leave to cool.

Assembling and Cooking the Cottage Pie

Click thumbnail to view full-size
The beef and vegetables are firstly spread on the bottom of the casserole dishThe mashed potato is carefully spooned on top of the beef and vegetablesA fork dipped in boiling water can be used to score a pattern on top of the cottage pieCottage Pie is removed from the oven but still looks pale on topCottage Pie is browned under a hot, overhead grill
The beef and vegetables are firstly spread on the bottom of the casserole dish
The beef and vegetables are firstly spread on the bottom of the casserole dish
The mashed potato is carefully spooned on top of the beef and vegetables
The mashed potato is carefully spooned on top of the beef and vegetables
A fork dipped in boiling water can be used to score a pattern on top of the cottage pie
A fork dipped in boiling water can be used to score a pattern on top of the cottage pie
Cottage Pie is removed from the oven but still looks pale on top
Cottage Pie is removed from the oven but still looks pale on top
Cottage Pie is browned under a hot, overhead grill
Cottage Pie is browned under a hot, overhead grill

When the meat mixture and mashed potato is cooled (an hour should be sufficient) put your oven on to preheat to 400F/200C.

Use a slotted spoon to transfer the beef and vegetables to a large casserole dish. Add a few tablespoons of the gravy only. Spoon the mash on top with a teaspoon in small clumps, rather than trying to spread it on straight from the pot. Take a blunt knife and dip it in boiling water. This will allow you to smooth the mash without forcing it down in to the meat and vegetables. A fork dipped in boiling water can be used to trace a pattern on top of the mash. Place the dish in to the oven for thirty minutes. Remove from the oven and place under an overhead grill to brown and crisp the top of the potato, providing an attractive finish.

Set the cottage pie aside to rest and cool slightly while you attend to your parsnips.

The chopped parsnip is firstly fried in butter until just softened
The chopped parsnip is firstly fried in butter until just softened
The whisky marmalade is added to the pan and melted
The whisky marmalade is added to the pan and melted
The parsnips are laid on a roasting tray
The parsnips are laid on a roasting tray

Whisky Marmalade Roasted Parsnips

Whisky marmalade is something which is normally spread on buttered toast and eaten for breakfast. It seems a shame, however, to limit the use of such a delicious and appealing product in such a way. Using whisky marmalade instead of honey to roast parsnips is just one idea for getting that little bit more out of this tasty preparation.

Allow one large parsnip per person. Scrape or peel the parsnip and chop in to large chunks as seen in the picture. Melt two ounces of butter in a non-stick frying pan and add the parsnip. Keep the heat at low to medium and season with salt and white pepper. Stir the parsnips around to ensure even coating in the butter and cook for six or seven minutes until soft. Add two teaspoons of whisky marmalade and continue to heat until the marmalade is fully melted.

Transfer the parsnips to a baking tray and be sure to pour as much of the marmalade and butter mix as possible over the top. Bake in the oven at 180C/350F for around ten minutes until the parsnips are beautifully glazed and burnished gold in colour.

The recipe is completed with some green beans which have been blanched in boiling, salted water for three or four minutes while the parsnips are in the oven.

Chicken Leg Portions Roasted on Root Vegetables

The roasted chicken leg portions are laid on top of the vegetables on a serving plate
The roasted chicken leg portions are laid on top of the vegetables on a serving plate
Vegetables to be roasted with the chicken
Vegetables to be roasted with the chicken
Vegetables are roughly chopped, oiled and seasoned
Vegetables are roughly chopped, oiled and seasoned
Chicken leg portions are laid on top of the vegetables
Chicken leg portions are laid on top of the vegetables
Chicken legs are cooked until the skin is crisp and golden
Chicken legs are cooked until the skin is crisp and golden
The vegetables are laid in a serving dish with the chicken legs on top
The vegetables are laid in a serving dish with the chicken legs on top

This is a really simple but delicious, all in one dish which sees the unmistakable flavour of the chicken captured in the cooked vegetables. These quantities should make for two decent portions. The vegetables which are used can of course be mixed and matched but be careful of mixing vegetables which have drastically different cooking times.

Ingredients

4 chicken leg portions (leg and thigh)
2 large potatoes
1 large parsnip
1 large carrot
1 medium red onion
½ tsp dried thyme
Olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Chopped parsley to garnish

Method

Put your oven on to preheat to 400F/200C.

Peel all of the vegetables and chop them in to large, fairly uniform pieces. Lay them on the base of a large roasting tray and season well with salt, freshly ground black pepper and the dried thyme. Drizzle fairly generously with olive oil before mixing them carefully around with a wooden spoon to ensure even seasoning and coating in the oil.

Lay the chicken leg portions as shown on top of the vegetables. Season with salt and pepper. Place the tray in to the oven for forty minutes.

Remove the tray from the oven and check whether the chicken portions are cooked by sticking a skewer in to the thickest part of each thigh and ensuring the juices run clear. Assuming they are cooked, transfer them to a heated plate and cover with aluminium foil to rest for fifteen minutes.

It is very likely that the vegetables will still be a little hard and undercooked. If so, stir them carefully but well and put them back in to the oven for a further fifteen minutes while the chicken legs are resting.

Remove the vegetables from the oven and lay them in the base of a serving dish. Place the chicken legs on top and scatter with freshly chopped parsley before immediate service.

Wholesome Winter Warmer: Beef and Root Vegetable Stew

Parsnip forms a prominent part of this one pot beef and root vegetable stew
Parsnip forms a prominent part of this one pot beef and root vegetable stew

A one pot meat and vegetable stew is a satisfying meal on a cold Winter's night, designed to warm the heart and soul as well as the body. There are no complicated cooking techniques required nor lengthy hands on preparation times. The ingredients are merely added to the pot and left to cook while you attend to other matters. Parsnips make an excellent addition to Winter stews and this really is a deliciously tasty way of cooking fresh parsnips.

The beef is firstly browned and sealed in a little olive oil
The beef is firstly browned and sealed in a little olive oil
The onion is sliced and the potato is chopped before both are added to the beef and stock
The onion is sliced and the potato is chopped before both are added to the beef and stock
The chopped parsnip and carrot are the last ingredients to be added to the beef and root vegetable stew
The chopped parsnip and carrot are the last ingredients to be added to the beef and root vegetable stew

Ingredients for Two People

1lb diced stewing beef
3 pints fresh beef stock
½ tsp dried thyme
1 large starchy potato
½ large white onion
1 large parsnip
1 large carrot
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Freshly chopped parsley to garnish

Method

Bring a teaspoon or so of olive oil up to a medium heat in a large stew pot and add the beef. Stir over a high heat to brown and seal. This will take about three or four minutes. Finely slice the onion and add it to the pot to cook down for two or three minutes, along with the thyme and seasoning.

Add the beef stock to the pot and turn up the heat to bring it to a simmer. It may seem like a lot of beef stock at this stage but you are going to simmer the stew for around two and a half hours so it will reduce considerably. While the stock is heating, peel and dice the potato and add it to the simmering stock. The potato is essentially being used as a thickening agent in this recipe but you could add it later instead, along with the carrot and parsnip, if you prefer.

The parsnip and carrot should be peeled, cut in to chunks and added to the pot after two hours' simmering. By this time, the beef should be deliciously tender and the potato and onion should have broken down to thicken the stock. You may have to add a little extra liquid at this stage - boiling water is fine but don't add too much. Cook for a further twenty to thirty minutes until the parsnip and carrot are soft before plating up, garnishing with the chopped parsley and serving immediately with fresh, crusty bread.

Do You Have a Passion for Parsnips?

Hopefully, at least one of the parsnip recipes on this page will have caught your imagination and appealed enough that you will be prepared to give it a try.

5 stars from 2 ratings of these Parsnip recipes!

Comments

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    • Gordon Hamilton profile image
      Author

      Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Hello, Ghaelach. Thanks for taking the time to visit and comment. Yes, it is surprising how versatile the humble parsnip can actually be. I'm glad you like some of these ideas and hope you very much enjoy whatever style of parsnips you make with your cottage pie. Best wishes.

    • profile image

      Ghaelach 5 years ago

      Morning Gordon.

      Sorry i missed your hub 5 weeks ago. I have just seen what i have missed.

      I'm amazed at the different ways of cooking a Parsnip. I'm gonna give these a try, but i must say i really have never been a lover of the parsnip.

      What i have found out though is as you get older you tend to get a great surprise by trying things that you would never touch in your younger life.

      Cottage pie is still one of my fav's so i'll be trying that out in the coming days.

      Thanks for a great hub Gordon.

      Take care.

      LOL Ghaelach

    • Gordon Hamilton profile image
      Author

      Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Hi, Brenda. I'm delighted that you tried out this recipe and enjoyed it. I'm not quite sure what made the parsnip bag such an attraction for your cat but they certainly are different from most other vegetables. I hope you like the mash and thanks for letting me know that you liked the chicken recipe.

    • profile image

      Brenda Durham 5 years ago

      Hey Gordon, here's my review of your recipe!

      I actually did try the Chicken Leg w/roasted veggies recipe! It was very good. I've always liked most root vegetables, and the parsnips had an unusual but nice flavor, although I don't think I could eat as many at a setting as I can eat turnips, etc.

      The funny thing was that my cat kept sniffing the parsnips and the bag they came in. I dunno if she liked the smell or was just drawn to the uniqueness of it, but I can vouch for the fact that they have a really pungent odor, almost a medicinal type of odor. I bet they're healthy for people!

      Next time I'll have to try the parsnip/potato mash; sounds really good too.

      Thanks for the recipes!

    • Gordon Hamilton profile image
      Author

      Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Thanks, DzyMsLizzy. I hope there's something here that you'll try for yourself.

    • DzyMsLizzy profile image

      Liz Elias 5 years ago from Oakley, CA

      Congratulations on Hub of the Day!

      You've earned it--what marvelous detail and excellent photos.

      Voted up.

    • Gordon Hamilton profile image
      Author

      Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Thanks you disujaalbart for visiting and commenting

    • disujaalbart profile image

      disujaalbart 5 years ago from california

      hey thanx for the delicious recepies

    • Gordon Hamilton profile image
      Author

      Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Hi, Nell and thanks.

      Sorry to make you starving at this time of night but glad you liked the ideas :)

    • Gordon Hamilton profile image
      Author

      Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Thanks, pinktulipfairie. I promise, the steak and kidney pie is a purely optional accompaniment. The parsnips taste every bit as good served without it! :)

      Thanks, Toyshika. I'm glad you're inspired to give them a go and hope you really enjoy them.

      Huntgoddess, thank you. Hope you'll give me warning so as I can have the parsnips in - and the soft bread...

      Rebecca, thank you for visiting and commenting. Parnsips are of a similar texture to turnip and require a similar cooking time but the taste is very different. Parsnips have a beautifully sweet flavour. I hope you get the chance to try them soon and really enjoy them.

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 5 years ago from England

      Hi, I love parsnips! and I have mixed them with potato, I usually mix them up in stews, now I am starving again! lol great ideas, and congrats on the hub of the day!

    • rebeccamealey profile image

      Rebecca Mealey 5 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

      You have a beautiful well designed Hub. Guess what? I have never in my life eaten a parsnip.(I don't think.) Now THAT is some food for thought. Pun intended. I will try to find some. I am from the South Eastern USA and we just don't cook those. Are they similar to turnips? I love turnips.

    • Huntgoddess profile image

      Huntgoddess 5 years ago from Midwest U.S.A.

      OMG, this is totally amazing. I love parsnips,and I love your beautiful photos. I'm coming to your house for dinner --- real soon.

      Just one thing, though: I hate crusty bread, so I'll be serving it with nice, soft bread :-))

      Meanwhile: Follow, Up, Beautiful, Useful.

      Thanks so much. This Hub really makes me happy.

    • profile image

      Toyshika Epps 5 years ago

      I've never tried it before, but thanks to your post I will! :) vote up :)

    • pinktulipfairie profile image

      pinktulipfairie 5 years ago from Torrey Pines Beach

      I'm in though I do not know about kidney Pie. Voted up!

    • Gordon Hamilton profile image
      Author

      Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Danette, it's good to hear you discovered parsnips. I hope this Hub helps you continute to enjoy them for many years to come. Thanks for visiting and commenting.

      Thanks, Brenda. Hope you enjoy whatever you choose to try.

      Thank you, apple. I hope this Hub has helped you discover something you will very much come to like. Naturally, I do recommend them very highly! :)

      Randomcreative, thanks for commenting again. Appreciate it very much.

      Delisaraub, I have heard of people using parsnips as potato substitutes. I enjoy both but definitely see the relationship and the point. I hope that something here helps you out in your quest. Thanks for stopping by.

      Athena2011, I am honoured that my Hub coincidentally happened to be Hub of the Day when you checked out the feature. You should very much take the time to browse Hub Pages and look at many, many thousands of wonderful Hubs and ideas to help you get started. I wish you the very best of luck and thank you for visiting and commenting here today. As to what parsnips taste like, it's hard to describe but they are a root vegetable, similar in shape and texture to carrots but certainly sweeter in taste. They are certainly available in the US but whether perhaps only in certain regions, I am not sure. Why not ask for advice in your local supermarket the next time you pop in, or even on the Food forum here on Hub Pages?

      Thank you, Keeley. I hope you do like parsnip and definitely agree with you that it's time to find out! :) Good luck with whatever you try.

      Business Time, I hope very much you get through your afternoon. Your parsnip suggestions sound delicious. Thanks for the visit, comment and further ideas.

    • BusinessTime profile image

      Sarah Kolb-Williams 5 years ago from Twin Cities

      There is nothing in this world quite as lovely as a parsnip, baked with a drizzle of olive oil and rosemary. (Unless it happens to be a chunky soup made from potato and parsnip puree.) Thanks for making my stomach growl -- will I be able to make it through my afternoon?? :)

    • Keeley Shea profile image

      Keeley Shea 5 years ago from Norwich, CT

      I am not sure if I like parsnip - Time to find out with these delicious sounding and looking recipes! Congrats on hub of the day!

    • athena2011 profile image

      athena2011 5 years ago from Beachfront - In My Dreams:)

      Congratulations on earning Hub of the Day status. It is what brought me to your hub as I'm about to build my first hub so thought I should learn from the best.

      Then I got interested in your recipes. Are parsnips available in the US? I would imagine they must be but do not ever remember seeing them anywhere. What other vegetable do they taste similar to?

    • delisaraub profile image

      delisaraub 5 years ago

      Hi Gordan! I am really so happy you posted this as I recently started experimenting with parsnips as a substitute for potatoes. Parsnips are just so much more interesting!

      That being said, I've really only cooked them up in the skillet and haven't really branched out much in the way I cooked them. But I plan on trying every one of these ideas as every one of them looks delicious. So in conclusion, this is not only a nicely written article but quite useful. Thank you!

    • randomcreative profile image

      Rose Clearfield 5 years ago from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

      Just back to stay congrats on getting Hub of the Day! You deserve it.

    • applecsmith profile image

      Carrie Smith 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas

      Awesome hub! I've never even tried parsnips, and I didn't even really know what they were until this post. Thanks for sharing such great ideas, information and pictures. Congratulations on being the Hub of the Day!

    • profile image

      Brenda Durham 5 years ago

      Wow. This is a beautiful hub. My mouth's watering already. Gotta try some of those recipes!

    • Danette Watt profile image

      Danette Watt 5 years ago from Illinois

      I only tried parsnips last year and love them! I've only had them roasted so far. Thanks for the many recipes to try

    • Gordon Hamilton profile image
      Author

      Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Stephanie, that is indeed a timely and fortunate coincidence :) It's great that the Hub is useful to you in this way. Thanks for visiting and commenting.

      Hi, SimeyC. Totally agree that parsnips can very much be seen as veg for holiday occasions. I'm not sure to be honest whether I've ever had parsnips roasted with the turkey but it's certainly a great idea and they sound delicious. Thanks for the visit, comment and additional option.

      Stessily, thanks for visiting again and the congrats. Much appreciated.

    • profile image

      stessily 5 years ago

      Gordon: It's wonderful news that this page has been awarded Hub of the Day! Parsnips are wonderful vegetables and your wisely selected recipes are appealing, so I am pleased at the extra attention which this hub should now receive. Congratulations!

      Stessily

    • SimeyC profile image

      Simon Cook 5 years ago from NJ, USA

      Yumm! Some great recipes here. In our house, roasted Parnsips are part of our Thanksgiving and Christmas meal. We add honey and butter to the parnsips and then roast them for about an hour with the Turkey - they come out very crisp and a little 'caramalized' on the outside - we fight to get them!

    • StephanieBCrosby profile image

      Stephanie Bradberry 5 years ago from New Jersey

      Thanks for the great recipes. I will have to try some of them. This is such a timely Hub of the Day. Last night I roasted some parsnips with other root vegetables. But I still have some left over and now some great applications for them.

    • Gordon Hamilton profile image
      Author

      Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Londontours, thank you for visiting and I hope you enjoy them

      Hollie, it's surprising how versatile these simple vegetables are. I hope you enjoy these new ideas. Thanks for visiting and commenting.

      Thanks, MP50. Hope it's given you some ideas.

      Glad it appeals, vasantha. Thanks.

      Hi, Hyphenbird. They certainly are underrated and I'm not sure why. Maybe they just look uninteresting in their raw form? I hope you enjoy your mash. Thanks for stopping by.

      Hi, Claudia. That's an interesting idea about putting raw parsnips in salads and one I will have to try. I hope that the whisky marmalade option is something you enjoy and can add to your parsnip preparation repertoire. Thanks for the visit, comment and congrats.

      Thank you, RTalloni. I am happy to have given you a new food option. Whatever way you try them, I hope parsnips are something you enjoy.

    • RTalloni profile image

      RTalloni 5 years ago from the short journey

      Congrats on Hub of the Day! I'm looking forward to trying parsnips now. You have me wondering why I've never tried them before--thanks!

    • Claudia Tello profile image

      Claudia Tello 5 years ago from Mexico

      The whisky marmalade roasted parsnips look delicious!!!! I would certainly try that one. At home I eat parsnip either in soup (just boiling them in stuck with onion and garlic and blending them to make a fantastic creamy soup) or in salads, cutting strips with a potato peeler and eating them raw with a mixture of greens, carrot and radish dressed with simple vinaigrette. The whisky marmalade is a nice third option to add.

      Actually roasted parsnip is also delicious, why haven't I cooked them that way before?...... I guess I didn't have the recipe. Thanks!

      Congratulations on your Hub of the Day nomination!

    • Hyphenbird profile image

      Brenda Barnes 5 years ago from America-Broken But Still Beautiful

      Parsnips are underrated in the vegetable world. So many times we just eat the same food over and over. I am going to the market today and shall pick up some parsnips.The parsnip and carrot mash looks great. I will try some of these recipes. Thanks for the tips.

    • profile image

      vasantha T k 5 years ago

      I liked the display of the vegetables. Interesting hub.

    • profile image

      MP50 5 years ago

      Hello Gordon Hamilton,

      "Awesome Article"

      Kind Regards

      MP50

    • Hollie Thomas profile image

      Hollie Thomas 5 years ago from United Kingdom

      Wow Gordon, what a fantastic hub. I also love parsnips but usually only roast them or make soup with them. Whiskey roasted parsnips sound very nice. Will definitely be giving those a shot and the beef and root vegetable stew.

    • Londontours profile image

      Londontours 5 years ago from London

      Thanks for these Delicious Recipes

    • Gordon Hamilton profile image
      Author

      Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Stessily, thank you very much for your visit and comment. Eeel pie is something I have tasted but have never actually cooked - you may be glad to know that I have no immediate intentions to change that fact! :) I'm glad you like parsnips and hope you enjoy any of these ideas which you try.

    • profile image

      stessily 5 years ago

      Gordon: You could probably make even eel pies look interesting and even taste delicious! Nevertheless when I hear "eel," I think of Henry I and his "surfeit of lampreys"! Yuk! I have long appreciated parsnips, so I am pleased that you spotlighted this often misunderstood and ignored vegetable in your inimitably clear style. I also enjoy the brief history which you include where needed in your recipe hubs. Every single recipe herein seems tantalizingly delicious and is perfectly presented on its plate. Voted up, useful, interesting, beautiful, awesome. Well done, and thank you for generously sharing these superb recipes.

    • Gordon Hamilton profile image
      Author

      Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Thank you for visiting and commenting, Sally's Trove. Hope you find the whisky maramalade - or maybe even have a go at making it yourself...?

    • Sally's Trove profile image

      Sherri 5 years ago from Southeastern Pennsylvania

      Thank you for this wonderfully rich collection of parsnip meals. The parsnips roasted in the whiskey marmalade look particularly appealing. I never heard of whiskey marmalade until now, but I'm definitely going to keep my eye out for it next time I cook parsnips. Voted up and useful!

    • Gordon Hamilton profile image
      Author

      Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Thanks, iZeko. I hope you do try them and very much enjoy them, whichever cooking method you use.

    • iZeko profile image

      iZeko 5 years ago

      Wow, you always have million ways to prepare one thing! I’ve never tried parsnips before, but now I definitely will.

    • Gordon Hamilton profile image
      Author

      Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Thanks you for visiting and commenting, AlmostLola.

    • AlmostLola profile image

      AlmostLola 5 years ago

      Great article! Thanks so much for sharing.

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      Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Thank you, randomcreative. I hope that the ideas featured here have inspired you to at least give parsnips a try and that you enjoy them enough to add them to your menus in future.

      Thanks, tamron. Glad you liked the recipes and hope you had something good to eat!

      Hi, 2uesday. It's amazing how some of the simpler ideas are ones that we don't think of when we're cooking. The parsnips and carrot mash is delicious and I hope you enjoy it as much as I often do.

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      2uesday 6 years ago

      Great new ideas for parsnips one of my favourite vegetables. I have made soup with them, roasted and boiled them but you have some new parsnip ideas here. I am especially looking forward to trying them mashed with carrots, now why did n't I think of cooking them like that?

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      tamron 6 years ago

      You just mademe hungry well illustrated and great recipes! Stumble Ya!

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      Rose Clearfield 6 years ago from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

      I've honestly never eaten parsnips, let alone cooked them myself! Thanks for the different recipe options. I may have to try parsnips sometime.

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      Gordon Hamilton 6 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      I've made worse typos than that, Maddie. It's amazing what simply missing out a letter or adding one by mistake can often achieve! :)

      Wesman, thank you for your visit and comment. I hope that parsnips are available in your part of the world and that you give them a try. They are quite sweet for a vegetable, perhaps similar in this sense to sweet potatoes, but delicious in a great many ways.

      Cloverleaf - thank you! :) I hope you enjoy the beef stew and that you are inspired to put your own particular twist on cooking parsnips. Maybe you'll create a Hub on what you come up with...??? If so, I look forward to reading it.

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      Cloverleaf 6 years ago from Calgary, AB, Canada

      Gordon, I always get excited when you publish a new hub; I know that there are going to be many treats in store and as usual you have not let me down! I sometimes roast parsnips but have never been very adventurous with them so I'm bookmarking your hub and will try out some of your suggestions. Your beef and vegetable stew sounds especially delicious - I can't wait! Voted up and awesome.

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      Wesman Todd Shaw 6 years ago from Kaufman, Texas

      Well this is an EXTREMELY well done hub! I confess to having never heard of parsnip, and to probably having never eaten any either.

      I'm always interested in new flavors and dietary stuff though - so this is wonderful!

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      Maddie Ruud 6 years ago from Oakland, CA

      I am so embarrassed about using "hear" instead of "here." I just had to say something.

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      Gordon Hamilton 6 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Hi, Steph. Thanks for stopping by the Hub. You're right about the time of year for parsnips; definitely a Winter veg. Hope you enjoy the mashed parsnips or any other way you try them cooked.

      Hello, mib56789. Yes, that's a very common occurrence. I find often that many people only cook parsnips on special occasions so they never have cause to vary their ideas. Glad this Hub helped you out. Thanks for the visit and comment.

      Hi, Simone. I'm surprised you've never cooked parsnips. I can promise they are both easy to cook and delicious. I very often do the same as you, cooking that little bit extra than I need - and often end up eating it when I wake up hungry at 5am... :) Thanks for visiting and commenting.

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      Simone Haruko Smith 6 years ago from San Francisco

      I have never, ever cooked with parsnips before, but now I really want to! All of these dishes look amazing. The cottage pie is especially fantastic, and I love how you've kept the scale of the meals pretty modest. I always like to cook for two- one portion to enjoy the night I make something, the next to enjoy for lunch the following day!

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      mib56789 6 years ago

      Root veggies are awesome and I never had any good recipes for parsnips. I would always just slice or chop them like carrots and throw in soup. Bookmarked this HUB for future reference.

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      Stephanie Hicks 6 years ago from Bend, Oregon

      Gordon, I love parsnips (actually all root vegetables). This is the perfect time of year to cook them. I've never made mashed parsnips, so I'd like to give that a try. All the recipes sound wonderful!

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      Gordon Hamilton 6 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Thank you, NMLady. I also love parsnips and am always looking for new ideas for cooking them. Glad you like these options.

      Hi, Maddie. Yes, the whisky marmalade parsnips are a little bit different. I suppose they are similar to honey glazed parsnips with just that extra little taste twist. I first tasted them quite a few years ago and had actually forgotten all about the concept until someone gifted me a jar of homemade whisky marmalade very recently. That was when I decided to give them a try. I hope that you enjoy them. Thanks for visiting and commenting.

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      Maddie Ruud 6 years ago from Oakland, CA

      What an amazing selection of parsnip recipes you have hear. I love parsnips mashed with potatoes, or roasted with carrots, but I'm intrigued by whiskey marmalade-glazed parsnips. I'll have to give them a try!

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      NMLady 6 years ago from New Mexico & Arizona

      This all looks very very good. Thank for sharing! I am a parsnip loving person!