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How to Make Vegetable Pakora

Updated on March 16, 2016
Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon has been cooking since childhood. He loves above all to take fresh ingredients and combine them in tasty and hopefully original ways.

Simple vegetable pakora made with ordinary flour rather than gram flour
Simple vegetable pakora made with ordinary flour rather than gram flour

Pakora is a dish from the Indian sub-continent, which - like so many ethnic dishes from around the world - has undergone Western adaptation to an extent where it is very often unrecognisable from its original form. It can loosely be described as one or more types of vegetable, deep fried in spicy batter, though chicken and even fish are also fairly common in its preparation. The biggest problem or difficulty experienced when attempting to make pakora is likely to relate to the type of flour used in the batter. Authentic pakora is made from gram flour (also known as chickpea flour, besan or garbanzo flour), which is not always easy to get a hold of in the West. While gram flour should be used wherever possible, this recipe shows how to make pakora using a mix of plain/all purpose flour and cornflour/corn starch with more than acceptable results.

Portion of vegetable pakora from an Indian takeaway restaurant in Lanarkshire, near Glasgow
Portion of vegetable pakora from an Indian takeaway restaurant in Lanarkshire, near Glasgow

The disparity in pakora recipes is evident not only in different countries but very much in different parts of a country. I've eaten pakora in restaurants around the UK and have found as a rule of thumb that the further south you are, the pakora - just like the weather! - is likely to be milder. Pakora in Glasgow and its surrounding counties will usually be very spicy and tongue-tinglingly hot, whereas vegetable pakora from a restaurant in London and the south-east is likely to be unrecognisably mild by comparison.

The recipe below will make a fairly mild pakora. If you wish to spice it up a bit, you can (carefully) do so simply by increasing the spice quantities.

Cook Time

  • Prep time: 15 min
  • Cook time: 10 min
  • Ready in: 25 min
  • Yields: 14 to 16 pieces of pakora
2.8 stars from 18 ratings of this vegetable pakora recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp plain/all purpose flour*
  • 2 tsp cornflour/corn starch*
  • 1 tsp hot chilli powder
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • Juice from half a lemon
  • Cold water
  • 12 oz potato, peeled and finely diced
  • 2 oz white onion, peeled and finely diced
  • 1 small spring onion/scallion, finely chopped
  • 1/2 green chilli, seeded and finely chopped
  • 1 tbsp freshly chopped coriander/cilantro
  • Vegetable oil for frying
  • Wedge of lemon to granish (optional)
  • Onion slices to garnish (optional)

* An equivalent quantity of gram flour should replace the plain/all purpose flour and cornflour/corn starch wherever possible.

Vegetable Pakora Preparation and Cooking Instructions

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Flour is added to a mixing bowlSpices are added to flourLemon juice and water are added to produce a thick batterSlicing, chopping and dicing the potato for vegetable pakoraVegetables are combined in a large bowlRested batter is poured in to the pakora vegetablesPakora batter is ready for fryingFrying the vegetable pakoraVegetable pakora is drained before it is platedVegetable pakora is plated, garnished and ready to serve
Flour is added to a mixing bowl
Flour is added to a mixing bowl
Spices are added to flour
Spices are added to flour
Lemon juice and water are added to produce a thick batter
Lemon juice and water are added to produce a thick batter
Slicing, chopping and dicing the potato for vegetable pakora
Slicing, chopping and dicing the potato for vegetable pakora
Vegetables are combined in a large bowl
Vegetables are combined in a large bowl
Rested batter is poured in to the pakora vegetables
Rested batter is poured in to the pakora vegetables
Pakora batter is ready for frying
Pakora batter is ready for frying
Frying the vegetable pakora
Frying the vegetable pakora
Vegetable pakora is drained before it is plated
Vegetable pakora is drained before it is plated
Vegetable pakora is plated, garnished and ready to serve
Vegetable pakora is plated, garnished and ready to serve
  1. The liquid batter should be prepared first and given some time to rest while you prepare the vegetables. Begin by putting the flour, spices and salt in to a bowl and stirring to fully combine.
  2. Pour the lemon juice in to the flour mix. Very slowly, begin adding cold water as you whisk with a fork. You want to prepare a batter wihich has the consistency of thick cream or paint. Cover and leave to rest.
  3. Peel and chop/dice all the vegetables. Mix them together in a large bowl before pouring in the rested batter. Mix well to combine. Note - the batter should now be used immediately. If you leave this batter even for a few minutes, the salt and spices will start to draw the moisture from particularly the potatoes, rendering the mix unusable.
  4. It is best to fry the pakora in a deep fry pan, in very hot oil of about an inch and a half in depth.
  5. Use two dessert spoons to shape a piece of batter before carefully depositing in the oil. You should fry the pakora in two or even three batches to avoid overloading your pan.
  6. After three minutes, use a metal slotted spoon to carefully turn each piece of pakora. A further two to three minutes should see them crisp and brown.
  7. Drain the pakora on kitchen paper on a plate before plating for service with a portion of homemade pakora sauce (see below) and the lemon wedge and onions if required.

Homemade Pakora Sauce

Pakora sauce is yoghurt and spice based and its strength is easily varied
Pakora sauce is yoghurt and spice based and its strength is easily varied | Source

An Indian Beer Goes Very Well with Vegetable Pakora

Indian beers of different types are fairly readily available in the West. You may wish to try serving one with your vegetable pakora - the two go very well together!

Indian beer definitely adds a little something extra to the vegetable pakora eating experience
Indian beer definitely adds a little something extra to the vegetable pakora eating experience

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    • Gordon Hamilton profile image
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      Gordon Hamilton 4 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Definitely can be a drawback with fried food - but I operate on the principle that once in a while is OK. Thanks for visiting and commenting.

    • GetitScene profile image

      Dale Anderson 4 years ago from The High Seas

      Sounds good to me. I avoid fried food because it's addictively delicious and these certainly sound like they are too.

    • Gordon Hamilton profile image
      Author

      Gordon Hamilton 4 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Hi, Noreen. I like the sound of this idea, though I've never tried it. Yes, we do eat pulses so this is definitely something I'll have to look at. Thanks for visiting and for the info.

    • profile image

      noreen 4 years ago

      hey..the batter can also be made using ground pulses (chana daal, moong daal) if you've heard about them in the UK. you guys do eat pulses/lentils right?

    • Gordon Hamilton profile image
      Author

      Gordon Hamilton 5 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

      Hi, Nell. They're a much disputed and misunderstood food, that's for sure but so delicious. Thanks for stopping by.

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 5 years ago from England

      Hi, This is really familiar to me as I love Indian food, you can usually buy them in a packet with onion bargies, which is my favourite too. These are so lovely to eat, I could just sit there and eat them without any sauce or main meal, so this is really interesting to see how to make them, I did wonder how you got the shape right! lol! then I realised that you used the spoons etc, fantastic, now I really need a curry too! voted up! cheers nell

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