Crispy Papdi for Chaats Recipe - Delishably - Food and Drink
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Crispy Papdi for Chaats Recipe

Rajan loves cooking dishes from his native Indian cuisine. He likes to share his favorite recipes with his online readers.

Papdi for Chaat

Papdi for Chaat

Chaat is a popular savoury Indian street food of which there are many varieties, including dahi papdi, chaat papdi, bhelpuri, sevpuri, batata puri, etc. These are usually sold from roadside stalls or food carts everywhere on the Indian subcontinent. Today, however, even five-star restaurants offer chaats as finger-licking delicacies to their customers. They are also very popular at weddings and other celebratory occasions, and these stalls are thronged by young and old alike.

Papdi may also be served as a snack with your morning or evening tea. The recipe is very simple to prepare, and when you make it at home it will certainly be healthier than the type sold at the market.

Cook Time

Prep timeCook timeReady inYields

15 min

45 min

1 hour

approximately 40 papdi

Ingredients

For the dough:

  • 1 cup maida (all-purpose flour)
  • 1/2 cup atta (whole wheat flour)
  • 2 tablespoons besan (gram flour)
  • 1 teaspoon ajwain (carom seeds)
  • 1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
  • 1/3 cup desi ghee (clarified butter)
  • Water, as needed

For frying:

  • Vegetable oil, as needed

Instructions

  1. In a mixing bowl, add the maida, atta, besan, salt, and ajwain. Mix well. Then add in the desi ghee and mix well again until it forms a mixture which just binds when pressed in the fist and breaks down when shaken.
  2. Add water little by little to make a medium-stiff dough. Knead the dough for 2-3 minutes; then cover it with a damp cloth and let rest for 20-25 minutes.
  3. After the dough has rested, grease your hands with a little desi ghee and knead the dough for a few seconds. Using an oil-greased rolling pin, roll out the dough into a thin round shape. Take around a 2-inch diameter round cap of any bottle and cut out circles of dough. Prick these circles all over with a fork and transfer to a plate. Prepare all the papdi in this way.
  4. Fry the papdi.
  5. Let the papdi cool down completely. Store in an airtight jar or container. They will keep well for up to a couple of weeks.

Crispy Papdi for Chaats Recipe

© 2020 Rajan Singh Jolly

Comments

Rajan Singh Jolly (author) from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar, INDIA. on September 18, 2020:

Try the recipes when you like, Devika. Thank you.

Devika Primić from Dubrovnik, Croatia on September 17, 2020:

Rajan I like the treats. Recipes such as this one is easy to follow and worth a try. I miss the taste of Indian snacks

Rajan Singh Jolly (author) from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar, INDIA. on September 17, 2020:

Peggy, these are fried flour crispies, savoury and form a basic ingredient in a number of street food snacks. Thank you.

Rajan Singh Jolly (author) from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar, INDIA. on September 17, 2020:

Thank you, Miebakagh.

Rajan Singh Jolly (author) from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar, INDIA. on September 17, 2020:

They do resemble cookies, Bill, but these fried flour crispies are savoury and are one of the basic ingredients for several snacks.

Rajan Singh Jolly (author) from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar, INDIA. on September 17, 2020:

Thank you, Pamela.

Rajan Singh Jolly (author) from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar, INDIA. on September 17, 2020:

Flourish, these fried flour crispies are used as a base for some streetfood/snacks and added to some others. You can also have them with tea or coffee. Thanks.

Peggy Woods from Houston, Texas on September 16, 2020:

When I looked at the first photo, I thought it was going to be a cookie recipe. After reading this, they appear to be a buttery type of cracker that is fried instead of baked.

Miebakagh Fiberesima from Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NIGERIA. on September 16, 2020:

Rajah, thanks for sharing. Certain of the ingredients(flours) cannot be obtain in my area. But I'll look out for the carom seeds to go with plain flour, wholewheat flour, and wholecorn flour. Thanks for sharing.

Bill Holland from Olympia, WA on September 16, 2020:

Looks like a cookie. In order for it to be popular here in the States, you would have to add sugar. We love our sweets here. :)

Pamela Oglesby from Sunny Florida on September 16, 2020:

I have never has anything quite like this but I would like to try it. This looks very tasty. Thns, Rajan

FlourishAnyway from USA on September 16, 2020:

Are they usually eaten plain, spread with something or dipped in something?