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Vegetarian Filipino Adobong Kangkong (Asian Water Spinach Adobo)

As a child, Edwin's mom told him, "If you want to eat, you should cook it yourself." And that's exactly what he's been doing ever since.

Adobong Kangkong

Adobong Kangkong

Kangkong Cooked in Soy Sauce and Calamansi

Kangkong is a green, leafy vegetable that is used widely in Filipino, Chinese, Malaysian, and other Asian cuisines. In Chinese, the vegetable is known as ong choy. It's also known as Asian water spinach.

Adobo comes from the Spanish word adobar, which means marinade. But unlike Spanish adobo sauce, which is made up of vinegar, salt, garlic, paprika, and oregano, Filipino adobo sauce is made from soy sauce and either vinegar or a citrus like calamansi, which is like small, round lime.

The kangkong leaves are cooked for a short period of time only, which makes this an easy dish to make.

Cook Time

Prep timeCook timeReady inYields

15 min

5 min

20 min

4 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 bunch fresh kangkong
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 3 tablespoons calamansi juice
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
This is what fresh kangkong looks like.

This is what fresh kangkong looks like.

This is what calamansi looks like.

This is what calamansi looks like.

Instructions

  1. Wash the kangkong leaves and stems; then chop into 2-inch pieces.
  2. Heat the oil in a pan over medium heat.
  3. Saute the garlic and onions until the garlic turns slightly brown and the onions become translucent.
  4. Add the kangkong, soy sauce, and calamansi juice. Simmer for at least 2 minutes.

Variations

  • Use vinegar instead of calamansi juice.
  • Instead of calamansi juice, you may substitute lemon or lime juice.
  • Add your favorite meat such as pork, if desired.
  • Garnish with toasted garlic.

Filipino Soy Sauce

Comments

Edwin Alcantara (author) from California on November 17, 2020:

Not a problem Sp. Spinach works for this recipe too.

Sp Greaney from Ireland on November 16, 2020:

I would try this with spinach. I don't think I could get fresh kangkong where I live.

Edwin Alcantara (author) from California on November 15, 2020:

Glad to share with you Peggy.

Peggy Woods from Houston, Texas on November 15, 2020:

Thanks for introducing me to foods with which I am unfamiliar. The exterior of a calamansi looks like a lime. If kangkong tastes anything like spinach, I know that I would like this recipe.