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Paksiw na Pata: A Filipino Pork Hock Recipe

Hailing from the Philippines, Eric is a true foodie and has enjoyed cooking from an early age.

Paksiw na pata is a sweet and sour pork hock stew with a deliciously complex flavor. The name of the dish comes from paksiw, which refers to dishes that are stewed in vinegar and garlic, and pata, which is the Tagalog term for pork hock, ham hock, or pork knuckle—otherwise known as the meat that is found at the leg between the knee joints and the feet.

Rich in protein and fat, pata consists of bone, flesh, fat, and connective tissue. In Japanese, it is called hamuhokku; in Korean, haem hokeu; in Vietnamese, chân giò; and in German, Schweinefleisch Sprunggelenk. It is usually smoked or cured, but it can also be prepared fresh. It has lots of uses including soup, kare-kare (curry), ramen, hamonado, as well as the dish described here, paksiw na pata.

There are many variations of paksiw na pata. You can add potato, tofu, cabbage, beans, or plantain banana. In the Batangas variation, they do not use soy sauce, just salt.

Cook Time

Prep timeCook timeReady inYields

10 min

2 hours

2 hours 10 min

10 servings

Ingredients

  • 2.5 kilograms pork hock, chopped
  • 1 cup banana flower
  • 1½ cups soy sauce
  • ½ cup vinegar
  • 5 cups water
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 10 bay leaves
  • 3 tablespoons peppercorn
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 medium onion, minced
  • 2 tablespoons cooking oil

Instructions

  1. Boil the pork hock for 20 minutes or until tender, then remove hair. Discard water.
  2. In a wok, heat the cooking oil. Fry the meat until golden brown. Set aside on a plate.
  3. Sauté the onion and garlic until they turn fragrant.
  4. Return the pork to the wok with the sauteed ingredients and add water, soy sauce, vinegar, bay leaves, and peppercorns. Bring to a boil and then simmer over low heat for 1 hour.
  5. Add the sugar and the banana blossoms, then continue to simmer for 30 minutes. Serve and enjoy.

Variation: Paksiw na Pata in Pineapple Juice

© 2020 Eric Caunca

Comments

Eric Caunca (author) from Philippines on November 19, 2020:

Hi Peggy, thank you for your comment. The only substitute for the banana flower is dried lily flower, but it is also available only on the Asian market. Try to use shredded white cabbage, it also works. :-)

Peggy Woods from Houston, Texas on November 19, 2020:

I have never seen a banana flower used in a recipe. I don't even know that it is available to purchase in our markets, but other than that, your recipe sounds good. Do you have any ideas of what could be substituted for the banana flower?