10 Yummy Noodle Dishes to Enjoy in Singapore

Updated on November 1, 2019
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Geek, gamer, writer, graphic artist. Yong’s favourite movies and games are those that allow him to enjoy the world from his bedroom.

Inexpensive and delicious Singaporean noodle dishes to enjoy.
Inexpensive and delicious Singaporean noodle dishes to enjoy.

Global Gastronomical Capital

Singapore has long enjoyed a reputation for being a gastronomical capital, thanks to its multi-racial heritage. Here are 10 inexpensive noodle dishes to enjoy if you’re visiting Singapore soon. All are widely available in restaurants, cafes, hawker centers, and local kopitiams (open-air inexpensive neighborhood eateries). Even at the most expensive outlets, these delightful noodle meals will not break your travel budget.

“Katong-style” Singaporean laksa. This version is eaten with a spoon and cooked using cut thick rice noodles.
“Katong-style” Singaporean laksa. This version is eaten with a spoon and cooked using cut thick rice noodles.

1. Laksa

Laksa refers to noodles cooked in spicy coconut broth flavored with seafood or chicken. A beloved institution in Singapore, there are different variants throughout the country, though all are spicy and rich-tasting. (In many cases, curry-like too) At most stalls, diners can also choose the type of noodle to have, these ranging from rice noodles to thick yellow noodles, to the linguine-like mee pok. Note that many stalls also include cockles, or hum, when serving laksa. If you’re not into the fishy taste of shellfish, do inform the staff when ordering.

What Types of Chinese Noodles Are Commonly Eaten in Singapore?

At practically all Chinese noodle stalls in Singapore, the following options are available

  • Shu Mian or Mian: Thick yellow noodles. Similar to spaghetti.
  • You Mian: Thin yellow noodles.
  • Mee Pok: Flat, linguine-like yellow noodles.
  • Mi Fen: Vermicelli.
  • Chu Mi Fen: Thick rice noodles.
  • Guo Tiao: Thick rice noodles

Many Singaporean fishball noodles compete on the freshness, and size, of their self-made fishballs.
Many Singaporean fishball noodles compete on the freshness, and size, of their self-made fishballs.

2. Fishball Noodles

Like laksa, fishball noodles is a beloved institution in Singapore, with many Singaporeans enthusiastically queuing for hours at popular stalls for a takeaway pack. Served in light broth or dried-mix with chili/ketchup, the eponymous “fishball” is a white globe made from fish paste, occasionally with bits of chives and carrot mixed in too. Similar to many other Singapore Chinese noodle dishes, diners can also choose the type of noodle to go along with the dish, with the mee pok option arguably being the most popular. Lastly, be sure to highlight your preference if you are weak with spiciness. Some stalls, famous for their self-made chili pastes, serve truly mouth-burning mixes.

The Thai-inspired mee siam.
The Thai-inspired mee siam.

3. Mee Siam

As the name suggests, mee siam means “Noodles in Siam Style” and refers to rice vermicelli cooked in a spicy and sour thin broth. Originally a Malay dish, mee siam is nowadays served by many Chinese stalls and western cafes too, with the difference between outlets a matter of condiments and spiciness of the broth. Unlike most other Singaporean Chinese noodle dishes, mee siam is also always cooked using vermicelli; you will get strange stares if you request thick noodles to be used. Finally, peanut is often a key ingredient of the Thai-inspired broth. Travelers who are allergic will, unfortunately, have to give this lovely dish a miss.

A steaming bowl of mee rebus is a great way to start a day in Singapore.
A steaming bowl of mee rebus is a great way to start a day in Singapore.

4. Mee Rebus

Another popular Malay noodle dish, mee rebus literally means “boiled noodles,” and refers to thick yellow noodles cooked in a rich peanut-based gravy. Typically served with boiled egg, tofu, and chopped green chili, mee rebus is a joy to have for breakfast, or as a light meal at any other time of the day. At certain cafes and restaurants, begedil, or Malay-style fried potato patty, could also be included with the dish, making the dish a great way to sample Malay cuisine. Last but not least, and similar to mee siam, mee rebus is always cooked with thick yellow noodles. The dish is never prepared using other types of noodles.

A typical “economical” bee hoon stall in Singapore that offers fried rice, kway teow, and other staples, too.
A typical “economical” bee hoon stall in Singapore that offers fried rice, kway teow, and other staples, too.

5. “Economical” Bee Hoon

This rather nonsensical-sounding name refers to inexpensive fried vermicelli set meals in which you pick the accompanying dishes from a counter. Widely available at kopitiams, typical side dishes include fried luncheon meat, spicy string beans, otah (spicy marinated fish paste), curry vegetables, and so on. Many stalls also offer the option of rice or thick Chinese noodles fried with black sauce, in replacement of vermicelli.

There are different ways of preparing mee goreng. Shown here is “maggi” mee goreng, fried using instant noodles.
There are different ways of preparing mee goreng. Shown here is “maggi” mee goreng, fried using instant noodles.

6. Mee Goreng

One of the most colorful noodle dishes you can enjoy in Southeast Asia, mee goreng means spicy fried noodles and is widely available at Malay and Indian stalls. In Singapore, ketchup is often mixed in during the stir-frying process too, the result of which is the noodle gaining a vibrant red when cooked. To further enhance flavor, tofu, meat, and even seafood could be mixed in; many Singaporeans also request for an additional topping of a fried egg. Of note, some Chinese stalls in Singapore serve this classic dish too. However, the Chinese version typically comes with a thick gravy; one that’s mixed with egg.

Prawn noodles “soup.” One of the most popular noodle dishes in Singapore.
Prawn noodles “soup.” One of the most popular noodle dishes in Singapore.

7. Prawn Noodles

There are two types of prawn noodles in Singapore.

“Hokkien” fried prawn noodles refer to Chinese noodles and vermicelli stir-fried with prawns, squid, chives, and pork. One of the most famous hawker center dishes of Singapore, Hokkien fried prawn noodles is especially wonderful when eaten with dashes of specially-made chili paste.

“Normal” prawn noodles, on the other hand, is similar to fishball noodles, in the sense it could be served soupy or dry. To best enjoy it, opt for the soupy version. The broth is unique in that it’s dark and positively bursting with savory flavors. At more expensive stalls, larger, semi-peeled prawns could also be used. This dish is an absolute must-try for travelers fond of Asian seafood cuisine.

A typical plate of wanton noodles sold at a Singaporean kopitiam.
A typical plate of wanton noodles sold at a Singaporean kopitiam.

8. Wanton Noodles

Originally a Cantonese noodle dish, Singaporean wanton noodles is significantly different from those served in Hong Kong. Whereas Hong Kong restaurants typically include only dumplings and noodles in a thin broth, the Singaporean version includes char siew (sweet barbecued pork slices) and vegetables. Like other Singaporean-Chinese noodle dishes, wanton noodles is also available in soup form or dried-mix with a savory sauce. Lastly, for diners seeking a heavier meal, opt for sui jiao noodles. Sui jiao are still dumplings, but larger, oval in shape, and usually with vegetable bits in the filling. Correspondingly, sui jiao noodles are also slightly more expensive, and more fulfilling for diners fond of Chinese dumplings.

Singaporean dining listicles regularly list out the best bak chor mee stalls in the country. A testimony to the popularity of this beloved noodle dish.
Singaporean dining listicles regularly list out the best bak chor mee stalls in the country. A testimony to the popularity of this beloved noodle dish.

9. Bak Chor Mee

Bak chor mee means “minced meat noodles” and could be considered a variant of the above-mentioned fishball noodles. Instead of fishballs, minced pork and Chinese mushroom slices are the main features. Sometimes, there might also be a Chinese-style meatball and other garnishes like pork liver, too. Served dry (i.e., without broth) and usually eaten with copious amounts of chili mixed into the base sauce, bak chor mee is a rustic, meaty, and rich Singaporean dining experience. It is one that’s affordable and widely available, too. Nowadays, there’s practically a bak chor mee stall in every Singaporean food court and hawker center. Some stalls are also famous throughout the country for their unique preparation methods.

A typical niang tou fu stall at a Singaporean food court. Check out the number of ingredients available!
A typical niang tou fu stall at a Singaporean food court. Check out the number of ingredients available!

10. Niang Tou Fu

Niang tou fu, also known as ngiong tau foo, means stuffed tofu and is a fun dining adventure for travelers new to Southeast Asian Chinese cuisine. Unlike what the name suggests, tofu isn’t the main cooking ingredient, instead, you choose from a wide array of ingredients presented in rows before a stall.

Once you have picked six to eight ingredients, you inform the staff to cook everything with or without soup, as well as the type of noodle to use. Originally a Chinese Hakka dish, examples of ingredients include tofu stuffed with fish paste, fried wanton, yam slices, marinated meat rolls, fishballs, and even seaweed (nori). Today, practically all stalls specializing in niang tou fu also offer the option of having everything served in a spicy curry broth.

Questions & Answers

© 2019 Kuan Leong Yong

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    • CYong74 profile imageAUTHOR

      Kuan Leong Yong 

      4 weeks ago from Singapore

      Hi Lorna, thanks for commenting. Hope you visit us again soon too, and enjoy more of these yummy dishes. :)

    • Lorna Lamon profile image

      Lorna Lamon 

      5 weeks ago

      I visited Singapore a few years ago and was so impressed by the variety of noodles available. My favourite dish was Laksa which was delicious and satisfying. Great article with wonderful photos. Thank you for sharing.

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